I have this parent class:

class ListBase
  @@list = []

  def self.list
    @@list
  end
end

I'm trying to create two child classes like so:

class Child1 < ListBase
end

class Child2 < ListBase
end

I was under the impression that each of these child classes will have their own @@list class variable. However, I get this:

Child1.list.push(1)
Child2.list.push(2)
Child1.list # => [1, 2]
Child2.list # => [1, 2]

which means the child classes share the @@list from the parent class.

How can I create a separate class variable for each of the child classes without repeating?

  • 1
    I'm curious why you want to do that. Class instance variables are typically used for what you describe, as their scope is confined to the class in which they are created. – Cary Swoveland Nov 9 at 5:30
  • Actually, your question "How can I create a separate class variable for each of the child classes without repeating?" is contradictory. A class variable is for sharing among the child classes, and you are trying not to share it. – sawa Nov 9 at 8:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As @CarySwoveland comments, in your use case, you should use a class instance variable:

class ListBase
  @list = []

  def self.list
    @list
  end
end

Not even sure why you thought of using a class variable for your use case.

  • 1
    Thanks, yes once you point it out, it became pretty clear that I actually ought to be using a class instance variable. – Ashish Acharya Nov 9 at 12:32

You are using class variable through class method (getter/reader).
So you can override that method in derived classes and use own class variable for every derived class.
Not fun, but that how class variables works, they are shared within a class and derived classes as well.

class ListBase
  def self.list
    @@base_list ||= []
  end
end

class ListOne
  def self.list
    @@one_list ||= []
  end
end

class ListTwo
  def self.list
    @@two_list ||= []
  end
end

ListOne.list << 1
ListTwo.list << 2

puts ListOne.list
# => [1]
puts ListTwo.list
# => [2]

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