Given the following procedure to return RTTi information

procedure TForm16.GetRttiInfo( const APersitent : TPersistent; Var RStrings : TStringList );
  var
    Context: TRttiContext;
    RType: TRttiType;
    Prop: TRttiProperty;
    S : string;
    LType : TRttiType;

  begin
    RType := Context.GetType( APersitent.ClassType );
      for Prop in RType.GetProperties do
        begin
          LType := Prop.PropertyType;

            if not ( GetPropInfo( APersitent, Prop.Name ) = nil ) then //Non published properties generates an exception
              begin
                if not( ( Prop.Name = 'Name' ) or ( Prop.Name = 'Tag' ) )  then
                  begin

                    case LType.TypeKind of

                      TTypeKind( tkFloat ) :
                        begin
                          S := VarToStr( GetPropValue( APersitent, Prop.Name, false ) );
                          RStrings.Add( Prop.Name + ' : ' + LType.ToString() + ' = ' + S );
                        end
                    else
                      begin
                        S := VarToStr( GetPropValue( APersitent, Prop.Name, false ) );
                        RStrings.Add( Prop.Name + ' : ' + LType.ToString() + ' = ' + S );
                      end;
                    end;

              end;
        end;
  end;

when LType.TypeKind = tkFloat the code never reaches

case LType.TypeKind of

  TTypeKind( tkFloat ) :

so I have to handle the tkFloat with the default statement for the case. The other TTypeKinds - tkEnumeration, tkClass, tkMethod etc, handle without a problem. Under debug evaluating LType.ToString() returns 'Single' not 'Float', but, there is no tkSingle in TTypeKind.

How does one handle tkFloat with the case statement?

  • 1
    TTypeKind( tkFloat ) should be simply tkFloat, or at worst TTypeKind.tkFloat. If LType.TypeKind really returns tkFloat (ordinal 4, did you verify THAT with the debugger?) then there is no reason for the case not to work correctly. – Remy Lebeau Nov 9 at 6:02

Disregard this question as the problem was with SynHighlighterCpp.pas. TTypeKind( tkFloat ) is returning TtkTokenType = 12 not TTypeKind = 4.

I moved SynHighlighterCpp.pas before System.TypInfo in the uses list and that sorted the issue.

  • One has to wary of name clashes in units. – GrooverMD Nov 9 at 7:58
  • 2
    Yes. If the enum name would be the same, you could use the unit name to specify which one you want. That's slightly more solid that changing the order in the uses clause: TypeInfo.TTypeKind.tkFloat. In this case, of course, the type names are different, so just writing TTypeKind.tkFloat would already have solved it. The problem with your typecast is that each enum is an ordinal value and can just be casted to any other. So you take the ordinal value of TtkTokenType.tkFloat ( = 12), and bluntly cast it to TTypeKind. – GolezTrol Nov 9 at 8:26
  • 1
    You probably added that typecast because the compiler was complaining that tkFloat was not valid in that context. That was your queue that something was wrong, but you accidentally fixed it the wrong way. :-) Maybe one has to be even more wary of hard, unchecked typecasts, because they basically overrule many of the checks the compiler can do for you. :) – GolezTrol Nov 9 at 8:29
  • Please remove the question since it is of no use to future visitors – David Heffernan Nov 9 at 12:34

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