I'm trying to decode a file, which is mostly encoded with base64. What I want to do is to decode the following, while still maintaining the [_*_].

example.txt

wq9cXyjjg4QpXy/Crwo=
[_NOTBASE64ED_]
aGkgdGhlcmUK
[_CONSTANT_]
SGVsbG8gV29ybGQhCg==

Sometimes it'll be in this form

aGkgdGhlcmUK[_CONSTANT_]SGVsbG8gV29ybGQhCg==

Desired output

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
[_NOTBASE64ED_]
hi there
[_CONSTANT_]
Hello World!
hi there[_CONSTANT_]Hello World!

Error output

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
4��!:�@�H\�B�8ԓ��[��ܛBbase64: invalid input

What I've tried

base64 -di example.txt
base64 -d example.txt
base64 --wrap=0 -d -i example.txt

I tried to individually base64 the [_*_] using grep -o. Then find and
replacing them through a weird arrangement with arrays, but I couldn't
get it to work. base64ing it all, then decoding. Results in double base64ed rows.

The file is significantly downsized! Encoded using base64 --wrap=0, while loop, and if/else statement. The [_*_] still need to be there after being decoded.

  • Are the base64 blocks always a single line? – Barmar Nov 9 at 23:47
  • Not always, sometimes its like wq9cXyjjg4QpXy/Crwo=[_NOTBASE64ED_]aGkgdGhlcmUK – Caucasian Malaysian Nov 9 at 23:50
  • How is that different from what you posted in the example? – Barmar Nov 9 at 23:51
  • Its an example where the base64 blocks on the same line separated by the [_*_], If you mean if one base64 block is super long that it goes onto a new line, or if two are on one line without a separator, then no. – Caucasian Malaysian Nov 9 at 23:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I am sure someone has a more clever solution than this. But try this

#! /bin/bash

MYTMP1=""
function printInlineB64()
{
    local lines=($(echo $1 | sed -e 's/\[/\n[/g' -e 's/\]/]\n/g'))
    OUTPUT=""
    for line in "${lines[@]}"; do
        MYTMP1=$(base64 -d <<< "$line" 2>/dev/null)
        if [ "$?" != "0" ]; then
            OUTPUT="${OUTPUT}${line}"
        else
            OUTPUT="${OUTPUT}${MYTMP1}"
        fi;
    done
    echo "$OUTPUT"
}

MYTMP2=""
function printB64Line()
{
    local line=$1

    # not fully base64 line
    if [[ ! "$line" =~ ^[A-Za-z0-9+/=]+$ ]]; then 
        printInlineB64 "$line"
        return
    fi;

    # likely base64 line
    MYTMP2=$(base64 -d <<< "$line" 2>/dev/null)
    if [ "$?" != "0" ]; then
        echo $line
    else
        echo $MYTMP2
    fi;
}


FILE=$1
if [ -z "$FILE" ]; then
    echo "Please give a file name in argument" 
    exit 1;
fi;

while read line; do
    printB64Line "$line"
done < ${FILE}

and here is output

$ cat example.txt && echo "==========================" && ./base64.sh example.txt
wq9cXyjjg4QpXy/Crwo=
[_NOTBASE64ED_]
aGkgdGhlcmUK
[_CONSTANT_]
SGVsbG8gV29ybGQhCg==
==========================
¯\_(ツ)_/¯
[_NOTBASE64ED_]
hi there
[_CONSTANT_]
Hello World!

$ cat example2.txt && echo "==========================" && ./base64.sh example2.txt
aGkgdGhlcmUK[_CONSTANT_]SGVsbG8gV29ybGQhCg==
==========================
hi there[_CONSTANT_]Hello World!

You need a loop that reads each line and tests whether it's base64 or non-base64, and processes it appropriately.

while read -r line
do
    case "$line" in
        \[*\]) echo "$line" ;;
        *) base64 -d <<< "$line" ;;
    esac
done << example.txt
  • It seems to delete, anything before the [ in the wq9cXyjjg4QpXy/Crwo=[_NOTBASE64ED_]aGkgdGhlcmUK example (which I forgot to add in original post, now its added). Also you forgot a ;; at the end of *). – Caucasian Malaysian Nov 10 at 0:12
  • I wrote this answer before you added the edit with [_NOTBASE64_] in the middle of a line. – Barmar Nov 10 at 0:59
  • 1
    This would probably be easier in a more powerful language like perl. – Barmar Nov 10 at 1:00

I would suggest using other languages other than sh but here is a solution using cut. This would handle the case where there are more than one [_constant_] in a line.

#!/bin/bash

function decode() {
    local data=""
    local line=$1
    while [[ -n $line ]]; do
          data=$data$(echo $line | cut -d[ -f1 | base64 -d)
          const=$(echo $line | cut -d[ -sf2- | cut -d] -sf1)
          [[ -n $const ]] && data=$data[$const]
          line=$(echo $line | cut -d] -sf2-)
    done
    echo "$data"
}

while read -r line; do
    decode $line
done < example.txt

If Perl is an option, you can say something like:

perl -MMIME::Base64 -lpe '$_ = join("", grep {/^\[/ || chomp($_ = decode_base64($_)), 1} split(/(?=\[)|(?<=\])/))' example.txt

The code below is equivalent to the above but is broken down into steps for the explanation purpose:

#!/bin/bash

perl -MMIME::Base64 -lpe '
    @ary = split(/(?=\[)|(?<=\])/, $_);
    foreach (@ary) {
        if (! /^\[/) {
            chomp($_ = decode_base64($_));
        }
    }
    $_ = join("", @ary);
' example.txt
  • -MMIME::Base64 option loads the base64 codec module.
  • -lpe option makes Perl bahave like AWK to loop over input lines and implicitly handle newlines.
  • The regular expression (?=\[)|(?<=\]) matches the boundary between the base64 block and the maintaining block surrounded by [...].
  • The split function divides the line into blocks on the boundary and store them in an array.
  • Then loop over the array and decode the base64-encoded entry if found.
  • Finally merge the substring blocks into a line to print.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.