31

I have realized that it is possible to create widgets using plain functions instead of subclassing StatelessWidget. An example would be this:

Widget function({ String title, VoidCallback callback }) {
  return GestureDetector(
    onTap: callback,
    child: // some widget
  );
}

This is interesting because it requires far less code than a full-blown class. Example:

class SomeWidget extends StatelessWidget {
  final VoidCallback callback;
  final String title;

  const SomeWidget({Key key, this.callback, this.title}) : super(key: key);

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
      return GestureDetector(
        onTap: callback,
        child: // some widget
      );
  }
}

So I've been wondering: Is there any difference besides syntax between functions and classes to create widgets? And is it a good practice to use functions?

46

TL;DR: Never ever use functions over classes to make reusable widget-tree. Always extract these into a StatelessWidget instead.


There is a huge difference between using functions instead of classes, that is: The framework is unaware of functions, but can see classes.

Consider the following "widget" function:

Widget functionWidget({ Widget child}) {
  return Container(child: child);
}

used this way:

functionWidget(
  child: functionWidget(),
);

And it's class equivalent:

class ClassWidget extends StatelessWidget {
  final Widget child;

  const ClassWidget({Key key, this.child}) : super(key: key);

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return Container(
      child: child,
    );
  }
}

used like that:

new ClassWidget(
  child: new ClassWidget(),
);

On paper, both seems to do exactly the same thing: Create 2 Container, with one nested into the other. But the reality is slightly different.

In the case of functions, the generated widget tree looks like this:

Container
  Container

While with classes, the widget tree is:

ClassWidget
  Container
    ClassWidget
      Container

This is very important because it radically changes how the framework behaves when updating a widget. Here's a curated list of the differences:

  1. Classes:

    • allow performance optimization (const constructor, operator== override, more granular rebuild)
    • have hot-reload
    • are integrated into the widget inspector (debugFillProperties)
    • can define keys
    • can use the context API
    • ensure all widgets are used in the same way (always a constructor)
    • ensure that switching between two different layouts correctly disposes of the resources (functions may reuse some previous state)
  2. Functions:

    • have less code (and even there, I made a code-generator to make classes as small as functions: functional_widget)
    • ?

The conclusion should be pretty clear already:

Do not use functions to create widgets.

  • I just tested here with a stateless widget, but its build method is still beeing called. What could I be possibly doing wrong ? – Daniel Oliveira Dec 14 '18 at 17:04
  • Just little nit confusion. Some times required to use StatefulWidget instead of StatelessWidget so in this case we should go with StatefulWidget ? is it good? – Govaadiyo Dec 24 '18 at 12:17
1

When you are calling the Flutter widget make sure you use the const keyword. For example const MyListWidget();

  • 2
    May I know how does this answer the OP question? – CopsOnRoad Dec 26 '18 at 20:36
  • 1
    Look like I replied I the wrong section. I was trying to answer Daniel's question that the refactored stateless widget build method is still being called. By adding the const keyword when calling the refactored stateless widget it should only be called once. – user4761410 Dec 28 '18 at 21:35
  • Ok. Got it. People may downvote this answer as it has nothing to do with OP question. So you should delete it. Anyhow choice is yours. – CopsOnRoad Dec 29 '18 at 6:18

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