10

I am trying to understand the relationship between rmarkdown, sweave and knitr. Looking at code and examples I have run into two types of code headers and I don't understand what language/package they belong to.

The headers are

```{}
```

and

<<>>=
@
  1. What is the difference between them?
  2. Ho do they relate to rmarkdown, sweave and knitr?
  3. If I work on a .rnw, which one am I using?
9
  • sweave is based on a LaTeX base-format, rmarkdown is based on markdown. Both allow code-chunks for R-code, output, and plots. knitr used to support sweave but apparently no longer does, so it renders rmarkdown into one of many output formats (including LaTeX, pdf, html, markdown, docx, epub).
    – r2evans
    Nov 10 '18 at 4:28
  • 1
    @r2evans Sorry for confusing you, but knitr supported Sweave from Day One, and still supports it. The documentation you mentioned said the full compatibility was dropped, which only means some Sweave chunk options were no longer supported. This .Rnw format is still well supported.
    – Yihui Xie
    Nov 10 '18 at 4:39
  • 2
    Unless I'm mistaken, the difference is: ```{} is for rmarkdown, and <<>>= is for sweave.
    – r2evans
    Nov 10 '18 at 5:02
  • 2
    Zweifler, I believe it is more of a markup to "normal LaTeX" that provides code-execution (simply put), however I'm not a pro on sweave. I have never really used it, frankly ... I was using R and LaTeX well before I knew about sweave, and then jumped directly into rmarkdown. There are definitely advantages to using sweave, namely the ability to control things in LaTeX that markdown does not support.
    – r2evans
    Nov 10 '18 at 5:20
  • 1
    @r2evans Your understanding above is absolutely correct, so please feel free to post an answer. If there's anything that needs to be further clarified, I'll be happy to chime in. Thanks!
    – Yihui Xie
    Nov 11 '18 at 3:33
15

Both sweave and rmarkdown provide the ability to run arbitrary code for R, python, and other programming languages. The pros and cons of each are varied, but a quick comparison:

R markdown :

  • typical file extensions: .rmd (case-insens), perhaps .rmarkdown

  • supports R, python, and several other languages

  • outputs to HTML, docx, LaTeX (and therefore PDF), and several other output formats

  • uses the triple-backtick for chunk demarcation

      Regular text.
    
      ```{r chunkname, chunkoptions, ...}
      a <- 1
      ```
    
      ```{python pychunk, chunkoptions, ...}
          def myfun(v: list) -> list:
          """
          Something important in this docstring.
          """
          return [a+1 for a in v]
      ```
    
      More regular text.
    
  • because it is based on markdown, there are some limitations for cross-references, table-control, etc; there are packages and known mitigation techniques for many of them (too many to list here). However, you can use direct LaTeX formatting in the markdown, so output to PDF can enjoy that control as well (though LaTeX code is not translated for other output formats).

Sweave:

  • typical file extensions include .rnw (case-insens) and I've seen .noweb (not fully certain on this ...)

  • supports R, and perhaps other languages if you can get to them through R (such as via reticulate)

  • outputs to LaTeX and therefore PDF

  • uses <<>>= and @ for chunk demarcation:

      Regular text.
    
      <<chunkname, chunkoptions, ...>>=
      a <- 1
      @
    
      More regular text.
    
  • because it is based directly on LaTeX, you can as much control over formatting, cross-referencing, etc

knitr

  • processes files of both sweave and rmarkdown formats
  • some sweave pre-processing may be required (e.g., using Sweave2knitr), ref: https://yihui.name/knitr/demo/sweave/
  • the rationale for knitr is to "solve some long-standing problems in Sweave, and combine features in other add-on packages into one package (knitr ≈ Sweave + cacheSweave + pgfSweave + weaver + animation::saveLatex + R2HTML::RweaveHTML + highlight::HighlightWeaveLatex + 0.2 * brew + 0.1 * SweaveListingUtils + more)."
2
  • Could you add what knitr's relationship is to both?
    – Zweifler
    Nov 11 '18 at 18:44
  • Good addition, @LutzPrechelt
    – r2evans
    Sep 24 '20 at 14:20

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