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This question already has an answer here:

Is a pointer to an arbitrary array equal to a pointer to the array's first element after cast to void*, and independently of the compiler?

I need a template function that takes a pointer to array[0] and gives a reference to the array. The code below does the job (at least in gcc and clang), and I would like to know if this is a legal C++ code.

My doubts are caused by the fact, that without cast to void* the code that uses the template would not compile (error message: ``static_cast from 'int ' to 'int ()[10]' is not allowed").

Thanks in advance. Here is the code:

template <std::size_t n,  typename T>
inline T (& p2a( T * ptr))[n]
{  
  return *static_cast<T(*)[n]>( static_cast<void*>(ptr) );
}

marked as duplicate by πάντα ῥεῖ c++ Nov 11 '18 at 17:26

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Yes, the address of an array is the same as the address of the array's first element (i.e., there is no padding at the beginning of an array) and a cast to void* doesn't change the address, so your code does the right thing. However, it is more straightforward to write it as follows:

template <std::size_t n,  typename T>
inline auto p2a(T* ptr) {
    return reinterpret_cast<T(&)[N]>(*ptr);
}

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