1

For example, this works:

guard condition == true else { return }

Which is fine, but creates a silent failure. What would be nice is to have a static function that could output feedback whilst also returning. Something like:

guard condition == true else { stop("condition was false") }

Am I living in dreamland here, or might this be possible?

Of course, I recognise that the following is possible:

guard condition == true else { 
    print("condition was false")
    return
}

But is boilerplate heavy and kind of ugly. I have guard statements everywhere, this sort of code is: 1. useful; but 2. would bulk out my code by, like, 10% minimum.

It's utopian of me I know, but I would prefer an elegant solution. Anyone?

  • how about throwing an error simply? – holex Nov 13 '18 at 14:33
2

It really depends on what your function is all about. Typically methods with guard statements either have no return value or return optionals.

func myReturn() -> String? {
    guard condition else { return nil }
}

if you want an analogue of stop, well, you could throw an Error, or even a fatalError

func myReturn() throws -> String {
    guard condition else {
         throw BadConditionError
     }
}

Or

func myReturn() -> String {
    guard condition else {
         fatalError("Bad condition")
     }
}

guard is an early exit mechanism, it prevents your program from getting into invalid state, use it accordingly. I'd also recommend reading on defer mechanism.

  • Thanks @inokey. What, though, if it is not an error? Most of my guards do not cause errors. In that case should I just shut up and accept the print;return formation? – Joseph Beuys' Mum Nov 13 '18 at 13:56
  • @JosephBeuys'Mum In most cases you just write it as it is guard condition else { return }. It's actually very general rule for protecting against failable conditions and could be seen in many Swift code of many programmers. – inokey Nov 13 '18 at 14:04
  • 1
    @LeoDabus yeah, thanks for pointing, did bad ctrl+v :) – inokey Nov 13 '18 at 14:23
  • 1
    I'm not here to get emotional @inokey, let's try to keep this civil. I'm not convinced having to look up one short static function qualifies as excessive complexity. This seems to be a difference of opinion rather than anything else. Occasionally I have had to spend time working out which guard -> return was responsible for some VC stopping working, usually more time than it would take to look up one short static function. Thank you for taking the time to respond – Joseph Beuys' Mum Nov 13 '18 at 14:34
  • 1
    @JosephBeuys'Mum I do apologize if my tone appeared to be intimidating. By any means I didn't intend to make you feel like your opinion is insignificant. I'm sorry that I made you feel that way. I really feel your desire to make things nicer and support that. – inokey Nov 14 '18 at 7:47
5

Use precondition instead of guard:

func test() {
    precondition(yourCondition, "This is an error message")
    //rest of your function
}

If yourCondition is false, the scope is going to be exited and the error message will be printed.

  • 1
    I did not know about precondition(), it is very nice, thank you @Carpsen90 – Joseph Beuys' Mum Nov 13 '18 at 17:11
  • On occasion @Carpsen90, this will present a better solution than inokey's below, but I did promise him my accepted answer. If I could I would accept them both as I feel they both have their place. – Joseph Beuys' Mum Nov 14 '18 at 9:56
1

As I understand, you want to produce some output or show message on false condition or on nil value, before return in guard. Below is my thinking:

func checkForNil(value: Any?) -> Any?
    {
        if value == nil
        {
            //showMessage("Nil value...")
            print("nil value")
        }
        return value
    }

you can use this as below:

guard let obj = self.checkForNil(value: objLoggedInUser) else { return}
  • This is a cute solution @Hardik-Darji, thank you, but as I have already promised my accepted answer to inokey above (on one caveat) I'm afraid I won't be accepting it. – Joseph Beuys' Mum Nov 13 '18 at 16:51
  • Thank you @JosephBeuys'Mum if you can upvote, will be gr8 :) – Hardik Darji Nov 14 '18 at 13:37
0

Try using closures to get it working, i.e.

func func1(handler: ((String)->())) {
    let condition = (2 == 2)
    guard condition == true else {
        handler("condition was false")
        return
    }
}

func1 { (reason) in
    print(reason)
}
  • thanks for your input @PGDev but this seems worse than simply print()ing and returning. – Joseph Beuys' Mum Nov 13 '18 at 13:57
  • You asked for the returning solution right? Printing is just a way of using that reason. – PGDev Nov 13 '18 at 16:15

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