3

How can I find the best "match" for small matrix in big matrix? For example:

 small=[[1,2,3],
        [4,5,6],
        [7,8,9]]



    big=[[2,4,2,3,5],
         [6,0,1,9,0],
         [2,8,2,1,0],
         [7,7,4,2,1]]

The match is defined as difference of numbers in matrix, so match in position (1,1) is as if number 5 from small would be on number 0 from big matrix (so the central number from small matrix in coordinates (1,1) of big matrix.

The match value in position (1,1) is: m(1,1)=|2−1|+|4−2|+|2−3|+|6−4|+|0−5|+|1−6|+|2−7|+|8−8|+|2−9|=28

The goal is to find the lowest difference posible in those matrixes.

The small matrix always has odd number of lines and columns, so it's easy to find it's centre.

3
  • 1
    Such template matching almost certainly exists in opencv already.
    – wim
    Nov 13, 2018 at 18:23
  • nicely described - where is what you coded to try to solve that? Nov 13, 2018 at 18:28
  • 4
    Please do not vandalize your posts. By posting on the Stack Exchange network, you've granted a non-revocable right for SE to distribute that content (under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license). By SE policy, any vandalism will be reverted.
    – Blue
    Nov 19, 2018 at 18:12

4 Answers 4

1

You can iterate through the viable rows and columns and zip the slices of big with small to calculate the sum of differences, and use min to find the minimum among the differences:

from itertools import islice
min(
    (
        sum(
            sum(abs(x - y) for x, y in zip(a, b))
            for a, b in zip(
                (
                    islice(r, col, col + len(small[0]))
                    for r in islice(big, row, row + len(small))
                ),
                small
            )
        ),
        (row, col)
    )
    for row in range(len(big) - len(small) + 1)
    for col in range(len(big[0]) - len(small[0]) + 1)
)

or in one line:

min((sum(sum(abs(x - y) for x, y in zip(a, b)) for a, b in zip((islice(r, col, col + len(small[0])) for r in islice(big, row, row + len(small))), small)), (row, col)) for row in range(len(big) - len(small) + 1) for col in range(len(big[0]) - len(small[0]) + 1))

This returns: (24, (1, 0))

7
  • pylint: line too long.
    – Ahmad Khan
    Nov 13, 2018 at 19:16
  • I've updated the answer with a broken down version then.
    – blhsing
    Nov 13, 2018 at 19:21
  • Like your solution! Although having some issues: for matrix
    – IHav
    Nov 13, 2018 at 21:59
  • 1
    @IvanHlivan I see. I've put your sample data here: repl.it/repls/FrontFoolhardyExtraction and as you can see (by clicking on the Run button), the smallest difference does occur at (0, 16). How did you come to the conclusion that it should be (5, x)? And what is this "x" in (5, x) anyway?
    – blhsing
    Nov 13, 2018 at 22:22
  • 1
    Sorry, my fault. Compared other results.
    – IHav
    Nov 13, 2018 at 23:18
0

Done by hand:

small=[[1,2,3],
       [4,5,6],
       [7,8,9]]


big=[[2,4,2,3,5],
     [6,0,1,9,0],
     [2,8,2,1,0],
     [7,7,4,2,1]]

# collect all the sums    
summs= [] 

# k and j are the offset into big

for k in range(len(big)-len(small)+1):
    # add inner list for one row
    summs.append([])
    for j in range(len(big[0])-len(small[0])+1):
        s = 0
        for row in range(len(small)):
            for col in range(len(small[0])):
                s += abs(big[k+row][j+col]-small[row][col])
        # add to the inner list
        summs[-1].append(s)

print(summs)

Output:

[[28, 29, 38], [24, 31, 39]]

If you are just interested in the coords in the bigger one, store tuples of (rowoffset,coloffset,sum) and dont box lists into lists. You can use min() with a key that way:

summs = []
for k in range(len(big)-len(small)+1):
    for j in range(len(big[0])-len(small[0])+1):
        s = 0
        for row in range(len(small)):
            for col in range(len(small[0])):
                s += abs(big[k+row][j+col]-small[row][col])
        summs .append( (k,j,s) )  # row,col, sum

print ("Min value for bigger matrix at ", min(summs , key=lambda x:x[2]) )

Output:

Min value for bigger matrix at  (1, 0, 24)

If you had "draws" this would only return the one with minimal row, col offset.

0

Another possible solution would be this, returning the minimum difference and the coordinates in the big matrix:

small=[[1,2,3],
       [4,5,6],
       [7,8,9]]

big=[[2,4,2,3,5],
     [6,0,1,9,0],
     [2,8,2,1,0],
     [7,7,4,2,1]]

def difference(small, matrix):
    l = len(small)
    return sum([abs(small[i][j] - matrix[i][j]) for i in range(l) for j in range(l)])

def getSubmatrices(big, smallLength):
    submatrices = []
    bigLength = len(big)
    step = (bigLength // smallLength) + 1
    for i in range(smallLength):
        for j in range(step):
            tempMatrix = [big[j+k][i:i+smallLength] for k in range(smallLength)]
            submatrices.append([i+1,j+1,tempMatrix])
    return submatrices

def minDiff(small, big):
    submatrices = getSubmatrices(big, len(small))
    diffs = [(x,y, difference(small, submatrix)) for x, y, submatrix in submatrices]
    minDiff = min(diffs, key=lambda elem: elem[2])
    return minDiff

y, x, diff = minDiff(small, big)

print("Minimum difference: ", diff)
print("X = ", x)
print("Y = ", y)

Output:

Minimum difference:  24
X =  1
Y =  2
0

I would use numpy to help with this.

To start I would convert the arrays to numpy arrays

import numpy as np

small = np.array([[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]])
big = np.array([[2,4,2,3,5], [6,0,1,9,0], [2,8,2,1,0], [7,7,4,2,1]])

then I would initialize an array to store the results of the test (optional: a dictionary as well)

result_shape = np.array(big.shape) - np.array(small.shape) + 1
results = np.zeros((result_shape[0], result_shape[1]))
result_dict = {}

Then iterate over the positions in which the small matrix can be positioned over the large matrix and calculate the difference:

insert = np.zeros(big.shape)
for i in range(results.shape[0]):
    for j in range(results.shape):
        insert[i:small.shape[0] + i, j:small.shape[1] + j] = small
        results[i, j] = np.sum(np.abs(big - insert)[i:3+i, j:3+j])
        # Optional dictionary 
        result_dict['{}{}'.format(i, j)] = np.sum(np.abs(big - insert)[i:3+i, j:3+j])

Then you can print(results) and obtain:

[[ 28.  29.  38.]
 [ 24.  31.  39.]]

and/or because the position of the small matrix over the big matrix is stored in the keys of the dictionary, you can get the position of the small matrix over the large matrix where the difference is smallest by key manipulation:

pos_min = [int(i) for i in list(min(result_dict, key=result_dict.get))]

and if you print(pos_min), you obtain:

[1, 0]

then if you need the index for anything you can iterate over it if required. Hope this helps!

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