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My C++ program to calculate all the prime numbers using sieve of Eratosthenes method stops after 200,000. But I need to calculate the primes up to 2 million. Help would be appreciated if someone could tell me where I went wrong with my code.

#include <iostream>
#include<math.h>
using namespace std;

void isprime(long long int prime[],long int n)
{
    for(long long int i=0;i<=n;i++)
    {
        prime[i]=1;
    }
    prime[0]=prime[1]=0;
    for(long long int i=2;i<=sqrt(n);i++)
    {
        if(prime[i]==1)
        {
            for(long long int j=2;i*j<=n;j++)
                prime[i*j]=0;
        }
    }
    for(long long int i=0;i<=n;i++)
    {
        if(prime[i]==1)
        cout<<i<<endl;
     }
}
int main()
{
    long long int n;
    cout<<"enter number";
    cin>>n;
    long long int prime[n+1];
    isprime(prime,n);
    return 0;
}
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    200 000 ints is a lot of memory to allocate on stack. You should probably use std::vector or allocate your array dynamically. – Yksisarvinen Nov 13 '18 at 20:41
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    Is the argument long int n a typo and should be long long int? – Weather Vane Nov 13 '18 at 20:43
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    And why are you using an array of long long to store a single bit (0/1)? – Lee Daniel Crocker Nov 13 '18 at 20:43
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    This long long int prime[n+1]; is not valid C++, and even for the few compilers that support it as an extension will overflow the stack. – user2100815 Nov 13 '18 at 20:44
2

Since each sieve element contains only a 0 or 1, there is no need to use a long long int to store each one. std::vector<bool> potentially uses 1 bit per element and thus is optimal for memory efficiency.

Here is your code with a very few modifications to use a std::vector<bool>. Since some bit manipulation is required to get and set individual elements, this version may be slower than code which uses one byte or int per sieve element. You can benchmark various versions and decide the right trade-off for your needs.

#include <cmath>
#include <cstddef>
#include <exception>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>


// returns the number of primes <= n
long isprime(long n) {
    std::vector<bool> prime(n + 1);
    for (long i = 0; i <= n; i++) {
        prime[i] = 1;
    }
    prime[0] = prime[1] = 0;
    long upper_bound = std::sqrt(n);
    for (long i = 2; i <= upper_bound; i++) {
        if (prime[i] == 1) {
            for (long j = 2; i * j <= n; j++)
                prime[i * j] = 0;
        }
    }
    long num_primes = 0;
    for (long i = 0; i <= n; i++) {
        if (prime[i] == 1) {
            ++num_primes;
//          std::cout << i << std::endl;
        }
    }
    return num_primes;
}

int main() {
    std::cout << "Enter the sieve size: ";
    std::string line;
    std::getline(std::cin, line);
    std::cout << std::endl;
    long len = std::stol(line);
    long num_primes = isprime(len);
    std::cout << "There are " << num_primes << " primes <= " << len << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
  • Shouldn't it be one byte per element instead of one bit? Also, I think char is guaranteed to be of size 1 whereas bool isn't. I have seen popular SoE implementations that use std::vector<char> for the sieving vector. – Joseph Wood Nov 15 '18 at 4:52
  • @JosephWood: I don't believe the standard requires std::vector<bool> to be one bit per element, but every implementation I've come across does it that way. See for example this discussion. – James Reinstate Monica Polk Nov 15 '18 at 5:06
  • I think you are missing the larger point. You are saying bit when you mean byte. You need something like std::bitset to actually utilize individual bits. To my last comment, the standard does not guarantee that bool has to satisfy sizeof(bool) == 1. The only guarantee is that sizeof(char) <= sizeof(bool). See here : stackoverflow.com/q/9560029/4408538 – Joseph Wood Nov 15 '18 at 5:18
  • @JosephWood: I think you are missing the point, and not reading the link I provided. I am saying bit when I mean bit. The sizeof(bool) has no bearing on how std::vector<bool> is implemented. Again, read the discussion here. – James Reinstate Monica Polk Nov 15 '18 at 15:02
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    I just wanted to let you know that I have been experimenting quite a bit with std::vector<bool> / std::vector<char> and found that they behave rather differently. Sometimes, the char version is much faster, while the bool version can be almost twice as efficient in certain situations. Thanks for opening my eyes to this topic! – Joseph Wood Nov 24 '18 at 15:28

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