My question is about the line I have mentioned in the subject and which I can see in many places inside the production code.

The overall code looks like this:

if (0) {
    // Empty braces
} else if (some_fn_call()) {
    // actual code
} else if (some_other_fn_call()) {
    // another actual code
    ...
} else {
    // default case
}

The other branches are irrelevant to my question. I'm wondering what the meaning of putting if (0) here is. The braces are empty, so I don't think that it is supposed to comment some block of code. Does it force the compiler to make some optimization or are its intentions different?

I have tried to search for this explicit case here on SO and on the internet, but with no success. There're similar questions about JavaScript, but not C. There's another question, What happens when a zero is assigned in an `if` condition?, but it discusses zero assignment to a variable, not the 'if (0)' usage itself.

  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – Samuel Liew Nov 16 at 1:10
  • 2
    That statement seems irrelevant. Generate assembly code with and without that statement and you will see what is going under the hood. – haccks Nov 16 at 9:38
  • 2
    It's possible this is an automatically generated code. – freakish Nov 16 at 12:19

15 Answers 15

up vote 87 down vote accepted

I sometimes use this for symmetry so I can move the other else if{ freely around with my editor without having to mind the first if.

Semantically the

if (0) {
    // Empty braces
} else 

part doesn't do anything and you can count on optimizers to delete it.

  • 236
    Personal opinion: While this may be the reason code why it is written as it is, I think it's a bad justification. Code is read more often than it's written, and this unnecessary code just increases parsing overhead for the reader. – user694733 Nov 14 at 11:15
  • 13
    @user694733: You could argue that the common if else prefix to all significant code paths lines the conditions up nicely and makes scaning them easier. (That's subjective, though, and would depend a lot of what's really inside the conditions and code blocks.) – M Oehm Nov 14 at 11:25
  • 72
    I don't think if (0) {..} introduces any parsability/readability problem. It should be obvious to anyone who knows a bit of C. That's not an issue. The problem is the follow-up question after reading it: "What the hell is it for then?" Unless it's for debugging/temporary purposes (i.e., the intention is to "enable" that if block later), I'd advocate removing altogether. Basically "reading" such code would likely cause an unnecessary "pause" for the reader for no good reason. And that's a good enough a reason to remove it. – P.P. Nov 14 at 13:53
  • 77
    Seems like it definitely detracts from readability. It was so bad it sent that programmer to SO to ask what it was for. Not a good sign. – Vectorjohn Nov 14 at 21:58
  • 26
    Even using this pattern, I don't know if you can "move else if around the editor without worry" because the conditions may not be mutually exclusive, in which case order matters. Personally I would use only if, and perform early return, extracting the logic chain to a separate function if necessary. – John Wu Nov 15 at 3:44

This can be useful if there are #if statements, ala

   if (0)
   {
       // Empty block
   }
#if TEST1_ENABLED
   else if (test1())
   {
      action1();
   }
#endif
#if TEST2_ENABLED
   else if (test2())
   {
      action2();
   }
#endif

etc.

In this case, any (and all) of the tests can be #if'ed out, and the code will compile correctly. Almost all compilers will remove the if (0) {} part. A simple autogenerator could generate code like this, as it is slightly easier to code - it doesn't have to consider the first enabled block separately.

  • 5
    In many cases, an if/else if chain isn't used so much as a decision tree, but rather as an "act upon first matching condition" construct, where the condition that happens to have the highest-priority isn't particularly "special". While I'd not seen if(0) used as a way to allow all real branches to have consistent syntax, I like the consistent syntax it facilitates. – supercat Nov 14 at 20:31
  • 1
    It’s not even useful in this case because you can achieve the same effect without: just split the else if line into two and put the preprocessor guard in between. – Konrad Rudolph Nov 15 at 9:49
  • 1
    @KonradRudolph I'm not following; how would you write it? – JiK Nov 15 at 17:19
  • 1
    @JiK I’d remove the if (0) branch and reformat the rest such that else is on its own line, surrounded by a guard along the lines of #if TEST1_ENABLED && TEST2_ENABLED. – Konrad Rudolph Nov 15 at 17:54
  • 5
    @KonradRudolph that's fine if you want to double the number of guards and triple the number of guard conditions mentioned, I suppose. – hobbs Nov 15 at 22:38

I've seen a similar pattern used in generated code. For example, in SQL, I've seen libraries emit the following where clause.

where 1 = 1

This presumably makes it easier to just add on other criteria, because all additional criteria can be prepended with and instead of an additional check to see if it is the first criteria or not.

  • 4
    The 1=1 is also "useful" because you can always add the where in front, unconditionally. Otherwise you'd have to check if it's empty, and if so avoid generating the where clause. – Bakuriu Nov 14 at 21:08
  • 2
    In addition, most databases will automatically "remove" the 1=1 from the WHERE, so it doesn't have an impact on performance. – Nic Hartley Nov 14 at 21:55
  • 7
    This is acceptable in a library that automatically generates SQL queries that are most likely never seen even by the DevOps team. It's not "acceptable" in high-level code that has to be written and read multiple times. – phagio Nov 15 at 12:32
  • This is really handy approach when generating some kind of dynamic SQL with unknown number of final conditions. – Skipper Nov 16 at 12:22
  • 1
    @freakish indeed I wrote the opposite: poorly readable syntax is acceptable in generated code since it will most likely never be read, not in high-level functional code that is maintained by developers. – phagio Nov 16 at 13:41

As written, the if (0) {} clause compiles out to nothing.

I suspect the function of the clause at the top of this ladder is to provide an easy place to temporarily disable all the other functionality at once (for debugging or comparison purposes) by changing the 0 to a 1 or true.

  • 2
    Nailed it. I couldn't see any other reason beside debugging. – tfont Nov 23 at 15:18

One possibility not yet mentioned: the if (0) { line could be providing a convenient spot for a breakpoint.

Debugging is often done on non-optimised code so the always-false test will be present and able to have breakpoint set on it. When compiled for production, the line of code would be optimised out. The seemingly useless line gives functionality for development and testing builds without impacting release builds.

There are other good suggestions above as well; the only way to really know what the purpose is, is to track down the author and ask. Your source code control system might help with that. (Look for blame-type functionality.)

I am not sure of any optimizations, but my two cents:

This happened because of some code modification, where one primary condition was removed, (the function call in initial if block, let's say), but the developers/ maintainers

so instead of removing the associated if block, they simply changed the condition to if(0) and moved on.

  • 3
    Isn't if(0) decrease branch coverage too? – David Szalai Nov 14 at 15:40
  • 1
    @DavidSzalai Not completely - at most it will decrease by 1 (from previous 2) - but one hit will still be required for coverage, to the best of my knowledge. – Sourav Ghosh Nov 14 at 15:41

It's code rot.

At some point that "if" did something useful, the situation changed, maybe the variable being evaluated was removed.

The person who was fixing/changing the system did as little as possible to affect the logic of the system so he just made sure the code would recompile. So he leaves an "if(0)" because that's quick and easy and he's not totally sure that's what he wants to do. He gets the system working and he doesn't go back to fix it completely.

Then the next developer comes along and thinks that was done deliberately and only comments out that part of the code (since it's not being evaluated anyway), then the next time the code is touched those comments are removed.

I've seen non reachable code blocks in pre-expanded JavaScript that have been generated using a templating language.

For instance, the code you are reading could have been pasted from a server that pre-evaluated the first condition that at that time relied on a variable only available on server side.

if ( ${requestIsNotHttps} ){ ... }else if( ...

which once pre-compiled hences :

if ( 0 ){ ... }else if ( ...

hope this helps you relativise the potential low keyboard activity of the pro-recycling coders era for which i manifest enthusiasm !

  • 1
    I agree, in the age of ubiquitous automation we should rely on autogenerated code more, as it allows us to spend more time on actual things. But for now, my exact point of interest is how this everything is architectured under the hood. – Zzaponka Nov 15 at 10:34

That construct may also be used in C to implement generic programming with type safety, relying on the fact that the unreachable code is still checked by the compiler:

// this is a generic unsafe function, that will call fun(arg) at a later time
void defer(void *fun, void *arg);

// this is a macro that makes it safer, by checking the argument
// matches the function signature
#define DEFER(f, arg) \
   if(0) f(arg); \              // never actually called, but compile-time checked
   else defer(f, (void *)arg);  // do the unsafe call after safety check

void myfunction(int *p);

DEFER(myfunction, 42);     // compile error
int *b;
DEFER(myfunction, b);      // compiles OK

I think it's just bad code. Writing a quick example in Compiler Explorer, we see that in both gcc and clang no code is generated for the if (0) block, even with optimizations completely disabled:

https://godbolt.org/z/PETIks

Playing around with removing the if (0) causes no changes to the generated code, so I conclude that this is not an optimization.

It's possible that there used to be something in the top if block which was later removed. In short, it looks like removing it would cause the exact same code to be generated, so feel free to do that.

As it's been said, the zero is evaluated to false, and the branch will likely be optimized out by the compiler.

I've also seen this before in code where a new feature was added and a kill-switch was needed (if something goes wrong with the feature you can just turn it off), and some time later when the kill-switch was removed the programmer didn't also remove the branch, e.g.

if (feature_a_active()) {
    use_feature_a();
} else if (some_fn()) {
   ...

became

if (0) {
   // empty
} else if (some_fn()) {
   ...

It helps to debug this block just putting if block 1. This disable all if else block functionality. And also we can expand the if else block.

    Actually according to my opinion, if we put any variable for checking inside
    e.g:-
public static void main(string args[])
{
        var status;
        var empList=_unitofWork.EmpRepository.Get(con=>con.isRetired==true);
        //some code logic 
        if(empList.count>0)
        {
          status=true;
        }
        if(status)
        {
         //do something
        }
        else
        {
        //do something else
        }
}
     if then its dynamically get the value in run time and invoke the logic inside it, else its simply extra line of code i guess.

    Anybody have any depth knowledge why this thing is used....or agree with me.
    kindly respond. 

@PSkocik's answer is fine, but I add my two cents. Unsure if I should do this as a comment, or as an answer; choosing the latter, because IMHO worth others seeing, whereas comments are frequently invisible.

Not only do I occasionally use

if(0) {
   //deliberately left empty
} else if( cond1 ) {
   //deliberately left empty
} else if( cond2 ) {
   //deliberately left empty
...
} else {
   // no conditions matched
}

But I also occasionally do

if( 1 
    && cond1 
    && cond2
    ...
    && condN
) {

or

if( 0 
    || cond1 
    || cond2
    ...
    || condN
) {

for complicated conditions. For the same reasons - easier to edit, #ifdef, etc.

For that matter, in Perl I will do

@array = (  
    elem1,
    elem2,
    ...
    elem1,
) {
  • note the comma at the end of the list. I forget if commas are separators or delimiters in C and C++ lists. IMHO this is one thing we have learned: [Are trailing commas in Perl a bad practice? commas] are a good thing. Like any new notation, it takes a while to get used to.

I compare the if(0) code to lisp

(cond   (test1    action1)
   (test2    action2)
   ...
   (testn   actionn))

which, you guessed it, I may indent as

(cond   
   (test1    action1)
   (test2    action2)
   ...
   (testn   actionn)
)

I have sometimes tried to imagine what a more human readable syntax for this might look like.

Perhaps

IF
:: cond1 THEN code1
:: cond2 THEN code2
...
:: condN THEN codeN
FI

inspired by Dikstra's [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guarded_Command_Language#Selection:_if][Guarded Command Language].

But this syntax implies that the conditions are evaluated in parallel, whereas if...else-if implies sequential and prioritized evaluation of conditions.

I started doing this sort of thing when writing programs that generated other programs, where it is especially convenient.

While we are at it, when writing RTL using Intel's old iHDL, I have coded stuff like

   IF 0 THEN /*nothing*/
   **FORC i FROM 1 TO 10 DOC** 
   ELSE IF signal%i% THEN    
      // stuff to do if signal%i% is active
   **ENDC** 
   ELSE   
      // nothing matched 
   ENDIF

where the FORC..DOC..ENDC is a macro preprocessor loop construct, that expands to

   IF 0 THEN /*nothing*/
   ELSE IF signal1 THEN    
      // stuff to do if signal1 is active
   ELSE IF signal2 THEN    
      // stuff to do if signal2 is active
   ...
   ELSE IF signal100 THEN    
      // stuff to do if signal100 is active
   ELSE   
      // nothing matched 
   ENDIF

This was single assignment, non-imperative, code, so setting a state variable was not allowed, if you needed to do things like find first set bit.

   IF 0 THEN /*nothing*/
   ELSE IF signal1 THEN    
      found := 1
   ELSE IF signal2 THEN    
      found := 2
   ...
   ELSE IF signal100 THEN    
      found := 100
   ELSE   
      // nothing matched 
   ENDIF

Come to think of it, this may have been the first place that I encountered such constructs.

BTW, the objections that some had to the if(0) style - that the else-if-conditions are sequentially dependent and cannot be arbitrarily reordered - do not apply to AND and OR and XOR logic in RTL - but do apply to short-circuit && and ||.

I have seen this a few times, I think the most likely reason is it was evaluating something in an older/different version/branch of the code, or possibly for debugging, and changing it to if(0) is a somewhat lazy way of removing whatever was there.

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