109

I'm trying to trigger an update on LiveData from a coroutine:

object AddressList: MutableLiveData<List<Address>>()
fun getAddressesLiveData(): LiveData<List<Address>> {
    AddressList.value = listOf()
    GlobalScope.launch {
        AddressList.value = getAddressList()
    }
    return AddressList
}

but I get the following error:

IllegalStateException: Cannot invoke setValue on a background thread

Is there a way to make it work with coroutines?

2
  • 6
    Is there a reason you don't want to use postValue? Nov 14 '18 at 16:28
  • 1
    @RedDeckWins. No, I just didn't take it into account but it is definitely the way to update MutableLiveData from a coroutine.
    – kike
    Nov 15 '18 at 8:31
231

Use liveData.postValue(value) instead of liveData.value = value. It is called asynchronous.

From documentation:

postValue - Posts a task to a main thread to set the given value.

18

You can do one of the following :

object AddressList: MutableLiveData<List<Address>>()
fun getAddressesLiveData(): LiveData<List<Address>> {
    AddressList.value = listOf()
    GlobalScope.launch {
        AddressList.postValue(getAddressList())
    }

return AddressList
}

or

fun getAddressesLiveData(): LiveData<List<Address>> {
    AddressList.value = listOf()
    GlobalScope.launch {
        val adresses = getAddressList()
        withContext(Dispatchers.Main) {
            AddressList.value = adresses
        }
    }
    return AddressList
}
1
  • 7
    Actually, I think this is the perfect postValue() usage scenario. There is no need to force Main Thread context.
    – kike
    Nov 15 '18 at 8:24
5

I just figured out that it's possible by using withContext(Dispatchers.Main){}:

object AddressList: MutableLiveData<List<Address>>()
fun getAddressesLiveData(): LiveData<List<Address>> {
    GlobalScope.launch {
        withContext(Dispatchers.Main){ AddressList.value = getAddressList() }
    }
    return AddressList
}
3
  • 3
    Don't call getAdresseList() inside the withContext(Dispatchers.Main) block because this will be run on the main thread. Call it outside so it's properly dispatched by Dispatchers.Default and use only the result on the main thread
    – pdegand59
    Nov 14 '18 at 16:30
  • You just literally return your heavy task to run in UI thread Apr 29 at 21:28
  • thank you @kike
    – Yogendra
    May 7 at 13:25
4

Although others have pointed out that, in this case, the library provides its own method to post an operation to the main thread, coroutines provide a general solution that works regardless of a given library's functionality.

The first step is to stop using GlobalScope for background jobs, doing this will lead to leaks where your activity, or scheduled job, or whatever unit of work you invoke this from, may get destroyed, and yet your job will continue in the background and even submit its results to the main thread. Here's what the official documentation on GlobalScope states:

Application code usually should use application-defined CoroutineScope, using async or launch on the instance of GlobalScope is highly discouraged.

You should define your own coroutine scope and its coroutineContext property should contain Dispatchers.Main as the dispatcher. Furthermore, the whole pattern of launching jobs within a function call and returning LiveData (which is basically another kind of Future), isn't the most convenient way to use coroutines. Instead you should have

suspend fun getAddresses() = withContext(Dispatchers.Default) { getAddressList() }

and at the call site you should launch a coroutine, within which you can now freely call getAddresses() as if it was a blocking method and get the addresses directly as a return value.

4

If you want to updated UI by using Coroutines, there are 2 ways to achieve this

GlobalScope.launch(Dispatchers.Main):

GlobalScope.launch(Dispatchers.Main) {
    delay(1000)     // 1 sec delay
    // call to UI thread
}

And if you want some work to be done in background but after that you want to update UI, this can be achieved by the following:

withContext(Dispatchers.Main)

GlobalScope.launch {
    delay(1000)     // 1 sec delay

    // do some background task

    withContext(Dispatchers.Main) {
            // call to UI thread
    }
}
3

In my case, I had to add Dispatchers.Main to the launch arguments and it worked fine:

 val job = GlobalScope.launch(Dispatchers.Main) {
                    delay(1500)
                    search(query)
                }
0

I was facing this error when I called a coroutine inside runBlockingTest for a test case

TestCoroutineRule().runBlockingTest {

}

I got it fixed by adding the instantExecutorRule as a class member

@get:Rule
var instantExecutorRule = InstantTaskExecutorRule()

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