0

This question already has an answer here:

I can't understand following execution. I expected different results.

>>> f = {'ms':'ma'}
>>> isinstance(f['ms'], type(str))
False

>>> isinstance(f['ms'], type(dict))
False

>>> type(f['ms'])
<class 'str'>

marked as duplicate by MisterMiyagi, jpp dictionary Nov 15 '18 at 11:54

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  • 5
    type(str) returns type, so you are checking if f['ms'] is an instance of type, not an instance of str. If you want to check if something is a string, use isinstance(f['ms'], str). – khelwood Nov 15 '18 at 11:42
4

type(str) and type(dict) each return type, so you are checking if your objects are instances of type, which they are not.

If you want to check if something is a string, use

isinstance(f['ms'], str)

not

isinstance(f['ms'], type(str))

And if you want to test if something is a dict, you can use

isinstance(f['ms'], dict)

not

isinstance(f['ms'], type(dict))
1

I think you just want this:

>>> f = {'ms':'ma'}
>>> isinstance(f['ms'], str)
True

You don't need type(str)

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