EDIT: While Sung Kim's answer is correct for the original scenario, I forgot to add that this behaviour (of selecting the next item from the list) can be toggled by some other key, for instance ArrowDown, in which case the tabIndex would not be of much help initially at least.

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I'm trying to work on a dropdown component that has two separate (sibling) functional components. The first one is a regular <input> that will take in a value. The second one is a <ul> that will display the results.

The flow is that initially only the <input> is displayed, when you type in and get results back from the database, then the <ul> gets rendered.

The above functionality is done, however, what I want to accomplish now is that when I'm done typing (because I'm satisfied with the results I see) and I hit tab, then the first item on the results list (precisely a <a> within the <li>) gets focused, and then if I continue to hit tab the next item on the last will focus and so on until it reaches the final item.

So, essentially the focus action could come from either hitting tab on the input or, from the current list item (if it has already been focused).

I've been thinking about the cleanest approach to get this to work. I thought perhaps using ref via createRef and forwardRed could be a good idea, but honestly I can't wrap my head around it for the time being so I thought I'd reach out for help.

This is essentially what it looks like (everything is working as intended, I cut out pretty much all the logic to strip it down to the basics and focus on the main issue here, which is, well, focus...).

Parent Component:

class Parent extends React.Component {
  componentDidMount() {}

  handleInternalKeyPress = (e) => {
    if (e.key === 'Tab') {
      e.preventDefault()
      // do something?
    }
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <section>
        <section>
          <DropdownInput
            handleTextChange={this.props.handleTextChange}
            handleKeyDown={this.handleInternalKeyPress}
          />
          <DropdownResults
            results={this.props.results}
            handleKeyDown={this.handleInternalKeyPress}
          />
        </section>
      </section>
    )
  }
}

Input Component:

const DropdownInput = props => (
  <Input
    onChange={e => props.handleTextChange(e)}
    onKeyDown={e => props.handleKeyDown(e)}
    type="text"
  />
)

Results component (<ul>):

// Maybe this should be a React.forwardRef() instead of
// an arrow function, but I'm not sure if this is the
// best/most elegant approach
const DropdownResults = props => (
  <ul>
    {props.results.map((result, i) => (
      <li key={result.resultIdKey}>
        <a
          // perhaps a ref should go in here?
          onKeyDown={e => props.handleKeyDown(e)}
          role="link"
          tabIndex={i}
        >
          {result.resultTitleDisplayKey}
        </a>
      </li>
    ))}
  </ul>
)

Again, the compoenents are quite a bit more complex than this, but this is the basic idea of how they work.

It would also be ideal to get a hold of the focused item to set custom styles to it, for instance.

I've been giving it some thought but this one has really got me, particularly because I want to adhere to best/latest React practices so any help that can be provided will be much appreciated!

I've never used tabIndex but played around after reading some articles.

It looked like setting the tabIndex={0} worked instead of increasing it using i.

const DropdownResults = props => (
  <ul>
    {props.results.map((result, i) => (
      <li key={result.resultIdKey}>
        <a
          // perhaps a ref should go in here?
          onKeyDown={e => props.handleKeyDown(e)}
          role="link"
          tabIndex={0}
        >
          {result.resultTitleDisplayKey}
        </a>
      </li>
    ))}
  </ul>
);

demo

For some reason Google documentation (Using tabindex) says using tabIndex greater than 0 is an anti-pattern without much explanation (as well as this older blog post, which doesn't explain why not either)

even though MDN documentation doesn't say anything about using tabIndex greater than 0 being an anti-pattern.

But for now setting all values of tabIndex=0 seems to work.

You can fork the code.
Edit 002pz9kp20

  • Hey, thanks so much for the quick reply! Would you mind looking at the edit on the original post? This absolutely solved the native tab behaviour, but how about using other keys to tab, such as arrowdown. Thanks! – deathandtaxes Nov 15 at 22:03
  • 1
    @deathandtaxes Do you mean, you want to be able to move to different items using "arrow keys" as an alternative? (That's how I understood the updated question)... – Sung Kim Nov 15 at 22:14
  • 1
    Yes, exactly. I don't think this would be too complicated once the first item on the list has been selected. However I'm stuck on how to get that first item focused when you finished typing on the input and hit "ArrowDown" (from the arrow keys). – deathandtaxes Nov 15 at 22:17
  • @deathandtaxes I've updated the Sandbox using forwardRef to pass the list of refs down to the children so you can select using both tabs & arrow keys. It looks quite ugly by the way even though it works... It'd require heavy refactors. – Sung Kim Nov 16 at 3:54

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