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To simplify my container manipulations I wanted to find an API with the same kind of features like the famous Java 8 Stream API but in C++. After some researches I found Jonah Scheinerman's C++ stream library available at the following link :

https://bitbucket.org/jscheiny/streams

I tried to execute the following code using Visual Studio Community 2017 to test the API :

#include <Stream.h>

int main() {

    MakeStream::from({ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 })
        .for_each([](int value) {
        std::cout << value << std::endl;
    });
    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

Until here, there is no problem. The code displays correctly the numbers.

But when I initialize the vector in a variable :

#include <Stream.h>

int main() {

    std::vector<int> x = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
    MakeStream::from(x)
        .for_each([](int value) {
        std::cout << value << std::endl;
    });
    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

I have an access violation writing location at 0xDDDDDDDD in the xutility header file.

enter image description here

The problem seems to occur when the vector is being destroyed.

I'm really lost. Does anyone can tell me what happens ?

Thank you very much for your help.

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  • Sorry for that. Both examples have been updated. – user1364743 Nov 17 '18 at 13:20
  • 1 branch, 0 PRs, 0 forks, last updated 2014. Best of luck. Having said that, the problem doesn't reproduce on my Linux machine. – n. 'pronouns' m. Nov 17 '18 at 13:29
  • Both your examples work fine for me (using GCC & Linux). However I had to reduce the error detection level on my compiler to get it to compile which does not speak highly of the quality of the code. – Galik Nov 17 '18 at 13:30
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    The problem seems to be somewhere in the debug iterators the MS standard library uses, as can be seen from the screenshot. So it's unlikely the problem can be reproduced with other standard libraries. – Pezo Nov 17 '18 at 13:42
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    This might be happening because an iterator from the vector is not properly destroyed by the stream objects. Try to step through all the code and see if you can spot an iterator that gets copied but not destroyed. – Pezo Nov 17 '18 at 13:48
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The problem here seems to be that library uses twisted class hierarchies (including fancy stuff like template classes virtually inheriting different specializations of its own kind) yet all the classes lack virtual destructors so object destruction is not executed correctly and VS debug iterators will trigger an error during clenup. In particular, StreamImpl<int, Common> base class will have an ::std::unique_ptr<StreamProvider<int>> field which will be used to store an instance of IteratorStreamProvider<int, ::std::vector<int>::const_iterator> class.

Adding virtual destructor everywhere starting from StreamImpl and StreamProvider makes this problem go away.

Also I would say that using this library will take you in the direction opposite to "simplify my container manipulations".

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    @user1364743 to add to this answer, what you might want to consider instead is range-v3, which is coming to a future C++ standard (but can be used now of course). – Pezo Nov 17 '18 at 16:09

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