So basically I have a cylinder with a base (there is a circle under the cylinder), but there is not circle above. I want to make it a closed cylinder.

Here is the important part from my bool CMyApp::Init() function:

Vertex vert[(N+1)*(M+1) + N+2];   //NxM rectangle for our parametric equation
for (int i=0; i<=N; ++i)
    for (int j=0; j<=M; ++j)
    {
        float u = i/(float)N;
        float v = j/(float)M;

        vert[i + j*(N+1)].p = GetUV(u, v);
        vert[i + j*(N+1)].c = glm::normalize( vert[i + j*(N+1)].p );
    }

vert[(N + 1)*(M + 1)].p = glm::vec3(0, 0, 0); //center point for cone base
vert[(N + 1)*(M + 1)].c = glm::vec3(0, 0, 0);
for (int i = 0; i <= N; i++) {
    vert[(N + 1)*(M + 1) + 1 + i].p = vert[(N)-i].p; //cone base
    vert[(N + 1)*(M + 1) + 1 + i].c = vert[(N)-i].c;
}

Render function:

glDrawElements( GL_TRIANGLES,       
                3*2*(N)*(M),         
                GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT,  
                0);                 

glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLE_FAN, (N + 1)*(M + 1) + 1, (N + 2)); //draw cone base

The "cone base" is there because I started this project from a "Draw a cone" project.

How can I make a second circle but above the cylinder?

Edit: M,N: Const numbers (20 and 10)

My parametric equation (which is a FUNCTION called GetUV() ):

u *= 2*3.1415f;
float cu = cosf(u), su = sinf(u), cv = cosf(v), sv = sinf(v);
float M = 2.f;
float r = 0.5;
float m = v*M;

return glm::vec3(r*sinf(u), m, r*cosf(u));

How I create Indices (inside Init() function):

 GLushort indices[3*2*(N)*(M)];
for (int i=0; i<N; ++i)
    for (int j=0; j<M; ++j)
    {
        indices[6*i + j*3*2*(N) + 0] = (i)      + (j)*  (N+1);
        indices[6*i + j*3*2*(N) + 1] = (i+1)    + (j)*  (N+1);
        indices[6*i + j*3*2*(N) + 2] = (i)      + (j+1)*(N+1);
        indices[6*i + j*3*2*(N) + 3] = (i+1)    + (j)*  (N+1);
        indices[6*i + j*3*2*(N) + 4] = (i+1)    + (j+1)*(N+1);
        indices[6*i + j*3*2*(N) + 5] = (i)      + (j+1)*(N+1);
    }
  • 1
    what is M,N ? you need just 2 circles ... but I am not seeing even the one where are any sin,cos ? The usual is compute X,Y as parametric circle and Z is constant (different for each base, their distance is the cylinder height) – Spektre Nov 17 at 19:11
  • ... and what does GetUV do? Why glDrawElements and glDrawArrays? Where is the element list? – Rabbid76 Nov 17 at 19:14
  • Sorry, I edited the post. – József Huszkó Nov 17 at 19:28

The easiest way to draw the other circular cap is to just change the model matrix of the circle and make the draw call again. So if you're doing something like this before calling glDrawArrays():

glm::mat4 modelViewMatrix = calculateModelViewMatrix();
glUniformMatrix4fv(modelViewLocation, 1, FALSE, modelViewMatrix);

Do the same thing but translate the modelViewMatrix so that it's at the other end of the cylinder.

  • My goal is to make the other circle in the same way the first circle draws, with Vertex vectors. – József Huszkó Nov 17 at 19:57
  • You can do the same thing by hand by copying the geometry and doing the translation on the CPU then uploading it to the GPU again, but it's going to be far less efficient. That may not be a big deal in this context, but you should get out of the habit of uploading the same geometry multiple times because it's an antipattern when writing performant 3D code. – user1118321 Nov 17 at 20:00

So N is number of points on the circle circumference and M is the number of points per height...

LOL in your GetUV you are computing cu,su,cv,sv but not using them, instead you use the same sin and cos call again. if I see it right u=<0,1> maps circumference of the circle/cylinder (XZ plane circle) and v=<0,1> maps the height (Y). But it looks like that the function itself works as should (just slowly than possible) appart of that inaccurate M_PI usage which might cause artifacts.

First problem I see is

vert[i + j*(N+1)].c = glm::normalize( vert[i + j*(N+1)].p );

I would get rid of that line as it will create the cone ... which you do not want anymore (btw. very weird and slow method of cone creation)

Also the i + j*(N+1) is ugly instead I would do:

for (int ix=0,j=0; j<=M; j++)
 for (int i=0; i<=N; i++,ix++)
  {
  float u = i/(float)N;
  float v = j/(float)M;
  vert[ix].p = GetUV(u, v);
  }

Next problem you got is wrong usage of the Draw methods ... as you want a grid of points instead of just 2 circles you divided the stuff into GL_TRIANGLE_FAN and GL_TRIANGLES. That was almost correct but you should have:

2x GL_TRIANGLE_FAN one for each base 1x GL_TRIANGLES or GL_QUADS for the rest

as you want to use indices it is basically simpler/faster to use all as triangles and feed the indices buffer correctly so you got just single draw call. Sadly we do not see the part of code where you are computing the indices ...

Why N+1 and M+1 points? You do not need to duplicate first point in vert[] you can do it in indices instead...

Hope the VBO related part of the code is correct ...

Also beware that faces of the other circle should have points in reverse order so GL_CULL_FACE will cull of faces correctly ...

[Edit1] C++ example

Anyway if you want to use normals latter on you should also duplicate the caps due to different normal on the edge... If I put all together in my style of coding I got this:

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
const int M=20;                 // points per circle circumference
const int N=10;                 // point per cylinder height
const int pnts=3*((M*(N+2))+2); // 3* number of points
const int facs=3*M*(N+N+2);     // 3* number of indices
float pnt[pnts];                // (x,y,z) position per each point
float nor[pnts];                // (x,y,z) normal per each point
int fac[facs];                  // (i0,i1,i2) indices per each TRIANGLE
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void cylinder_init(float r,float h)
    {
    int i,j,ix,i0,i1,i2,i3;
    float x,y,z,a,da,dz;
    // compute position and normals
    ix=0;
    dz=h/double(N-1);
    da=2.0*M_PI/double(M);
    for (z=-0.5*h,j=0;j<N;j++,z+=dz)    // circles
     for (a=0.0,i=0;i<M;i++,a+=da)
        {
        x=cos(a);
        y=sin(a);
        pnt[ix]=r*x; nor[ix]=x;   ix++;
        pnt[ix]=r*y; nor[ix]=y;   ix++;
        pnt[ix]=z;   nor[ix]=0.0; ix++;
        }
    pnt[ix]= 0.0;   nor[ix]= 0.0; ix++; // top cap
    pnt[ix]= 0.0;   nor[ix]= 0.0; ix++;
    pnt[ix]=+0.5*h; nor[ix]=+1.0; ix++;
    for (j=ix-3*(M+1),i=0;i<M;i++)
        {
        pnt[ix]=pnt[j]; nor[ix]= 0.0; ix++; j++;
        pnt[ix]=pnt[j]; nor[ix]= 0.0; ix++; j++;
        pnt[ix]=pnt[j]; nor[ix]=+1.0; ix++; j++;
        }
    pnt[ix]= 0.0;   nor[ix]= 0.0; ix++; // bottom cap
    pnt[ix]= 0.0;   nor[ix]= 0.0; ix++;
    pnt[ix]=-0.5*h; nor[ix]=-1.0; ix++;
    for (j=0,i=0;i<M;i++)
        {
        pnt[ix]=pnt[j]; nor[ix]= 0.0; ix++; j++;
        pnt[ix]=pnt[j]; nor[ix]= 0.0; ix++; j++;
        pnt[ix]=pnt[j]; nor[ix]=-1.0; ix++; j++;
        }
    // compute triangle indices
    ix=0; i0=M-1; i1=0; i2=i0+M; i3=i1+M;   // circles
    for (j=0;j<N-1;j++,i0+=M,i2+=M)
     for (i=0;i<M;i++,i0=i1,i1++,i2=i3,i3++)
        {
        fac[ix]=i0; ix++;
        fac[ix]=i1; ix++;
        fac[ix]=i2; ix++;
        fac[ix]=i2; ix++;
        fac[ix]=i1; ix++;
        fac[ix]=i3; ix++;
        }
    i2=M*N; i0=i2+M; i1=i2+1;           // top cap
    for (i=0;i<M;i++,i0=i1,i1++)
        {
        fac[ix]=i0; ix++;
        fac[ix]=i1; ix++;
        fac[ix]=i2; ix++;
        }
    i2+=M+1; i0=i2+M; i1=i2+1;          // bottom cap
    for (i=0;i<M;i++,i0=i1,i1++)
        {
        fac[ix]=i2; ix++;
        fac[ix]=i1; ix++;
        fac[ix]=i0; ix++;
        }
    }
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

And preview:

preview

You just use single draw with GL_TRIANGLES on the whole fac[facs] indices buffer.

  • Thank you for your answer, I edited the post and added the Indices part. – József Huszkó Nov 18 at 17:32
  • @JózsefHuszkó I updated my answer also ... – Spektre Nov 18 at 19:39
  • @JózsefHuszkó how is it going did you solve your issue or not? – Spektre Nov 21 at 21:43

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