0

I have a file which appends each new observation to the end of the same file containing the previous observations. Therefore the format of the file 'data.dat' is like the following:

# Comments
# Comments
# Comments
x01 x02
x11 x12
.
.
xN1 xN2

# Comments
# Comments
# Comments
x03 x04
x13 x14
.
.
xN3 xN4
# Comments
# Comments
# Comments
x05 x06
x15 x16
.
.
xN5 xN6

Essentially, data.dat for each bulk has 3 lines of comments and then two columns of data. The goal is to store the same data with the following formatting (for plotting and programming usage reasons):

# comments # comments # comments
# comments # comments # comments
# comments # comments # comments
x01 x02 x03 x04 x05 x06
x11 x12 x13 x14 x15 x16
.
.
xN1 xN4 xN3 xN4 xN5 xN6

The comments should be preserved and they are not unique. Also, luckily, the number of data points is equal for all of the observations, meaning that the number of rows is similar form the first comment to the N'th datapoint. The only constrain is that it should use bash native commands like 'awk' or 'sed'.

What is the command for doing so?

The answer by @steffen is working:

awk '/^#/{t=0;ah[h+0]=ah[h+0]OFS$0;h++} /^[^#]/{h=0;at[t+0]=at[t+0]OFS$0;t++} END{for (i in ah) print (ah[i]);for (i in at) print(at[i]);}' file

But, I'm not understanding the logic here.

13
  • 2
    No, this is not clear please provide some more useful samples of input and specially output and let us know in comments then. Nov 18, 2018 at 1:26
  • The information provided in this question is not enough to come up with an answer.
    – ssemilla
    Nov 18, 2018 at 3:47
  • Are you by any chance trying to process FASTA format?
    – tripleee
    Nov 18, 2018 at 13:56
  • @RavinderSingh13 I have edited the question and hopefully, it is communicating better now, please see if it fits the bar of being re-opened?
    – Eisa
    Jun 11, 2020 at 16:03
  • @tripleee No, this file is the output of COMSOL multiphysics for a specific simulation
    – Eisa
    Jun 11, 2020 at 16:04

1 Answer 1

3

As others have commented, the question is unclear. You should provide output for this input:

$ cat file
# blah0
# blah1
# blah2
value0 value1
.
.
value2 value3
# blah3
# blah4
# blah5
value4 value5
.
.
value6 value7
# blah6
# blah7
# blah8
value8 value9
.
.
valueA valueB

If I had to make a guess, I'd say the logic may be so:

$ awk '/^#/{t=0;ah[h+0]=ah[h+0]OFS$0;h++} /^[^#]/{h=0;at[t+0]=at[t+0]OFS$0;t++} END{for (i in ah) print (ah[i]);for (i in at) print(at[i]);}' file
# blah0 # blah3 # blah6
# blah1 # blah4 # blah7
# blah2 # blah5 # blah8
value0 value1 value4 value5 value8 value9
. . .
. . .
value2 value3 value6 value7 valueA valueB
3
  • Thanks for your answer, can you please explain the logic a little bit?
    – Eisa
    Jun 11, 2020 at 17:26
  • 1
    I didn't write an exaplanation in 2018, because the question was incomplete and I didn't want to waste time for nothing (it was a guess). Without explanation, it takes more time to understand, so you should have provided more details. However, here's some explanation: There are three parts, logic for comments (h, don't ask, idk), for non-comments (t) and a final print out. Whenever there's a transition from comments to non-comments and vv, the counter for the other part is reset (t=0, h=0). And 2.: Each nth. line is concatenated with the previous nth. lines (ah[h]=ah[h]OFS$0;h++).
    – steffen
    Jun 12, 2020 at 10:04
  • 1
    It makes more sense now. Thanks.
    – Eisa
    Jun 12, 2020 at 16:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.