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I'm trying to create just the back-end part for a simple CRUD project. I'm completely new to asp.net and currently reading as I go. But I got stuck.

I've created the entities (models) I need

public class VehicleMakeEntity
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string Name { get; set; }

    public string Abrv { get; set; }

    public VehicleMakeEntity Make { get; set; }
}

I've also created a standard DbContext class and the repositories

class MakeRepository : IMakeRepository
{
    ProjectDbContext context;

    public MakeRepository(ProjectDbContext context)
    {
        this.context = context;
    }

    public void Delete(VehicleMakeEntity entity)
    {
        context.VehicleMake.Remove(entity);
        context.SaveChanges();
        Console.WriteLine(entity.Make.Name);
    }

    public void Insert(VehicleMakeEntity entity)
    {
        context.VehicleMake.Add(entity);
        context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Update(VehicleMakeEntity entity)
    {
        context.VehicleMake.Update(entity);
        context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        context.Dispose();
    }
}

Now the problem I have is I cannot find any documentation that both doesn't use MVC and uses repositories. I need to create a service class that implements basic paging, sorting and filtering but everything I look at Like this uses MVC and I have no idea how to convert it to my project.

13
  • 1
    If you are just starting out, I would suggest you 2 things: first of all, ditch completely anything you read related to Unit of Work / Repository, there are too few cases where those are required and be sure you don't need it if you are just learning. Secondly, ditch ASP.NET and EF and learn ASP.NET Core and EF Core – Camilo Terevinto Nov 17 '18 at 22:51
  • Another notice: the Q&A you linked is terribly wrong in two important aspects: first it fails at Dependency Injection, and secondly and most important, it loads an entire table to memory to then use a couple of values in the paginator. – Camilo Terevinto Nov 17 '18 at 22:54
  • I'm following a few tasks, they require the use of repositories. And yeah my bad about not making it clear, I am using ASP.NET Core and EF Core. After I'm done with the basics of the tasks I will most likely switch over to Razor pages as I read that everyone should learn that. – TimmyNeutron Nov 17 '18 at 22:56
  • you should update your tags to mentioning "core" also your title and body – Neville Nazerane Nov 17 '18 at 22:58
  • Razor Pages is for extremely simple web pages (think almost static information) or javascript intensive applications that don't use server-side MVC at all. If you plan on working on most real-world applications, you'll need MVC. – Camilo Terevinto Nov 17 '18 at 22:58
-1

Based on your code and comments, you have a setup that is meant for .NET Core web apps that can be implemented with services (dependency injection). You can, however, run the entire dependency injection setup on a console based app that doesn't host a web app.

First, you will need to add the Microsoft.AspNetCore.All package so you get all the classes you might be using (mainly Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection). You can now build your service provider something like this:

var provider = new ServiceCollection()
                .AddDbContext<ProjectDbContext>(config => // connection here)
                .AddScoped<IMakeRepository, MakeRepository>()
                .BuildServiceProvider();

You can now fetch any service you want out of your provider. The above code also allows you to add any service you find in any .NET Core MVC tutorial since it uses the same classes and libraries. Let's say you want to fetch the IMakeRepository, you can use the following:

var makeRepo = provider.GetService<IMakeRepository>();

You can now test out the functions inside your makeRepo object.

2
  • Microsoft.AspNetCore,All is an insanely huge meta-package. You only need to install Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection – Camilo Terevinto Nov 18 '18 at 22:43
  • The downvote doesn't make any sense. First of all, it resolves the issue. Secondly running locally and for a test, I don't see how several packages could be a big issue. Thirdly, NO you don't need only the DI package. The AddDbContext function is inside Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore nuget. That is just one example. Based on what I explained he can do with this code, he needs to keep installing packages for each need. Explaining the need of Microsoft.AspNetCore,All further just go back to the purpose of the package in the first place. – Neville Nazerane Nov 19 '18 at 4:34

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