1

I was wondering, why did we use count++ instead of, for example count += 0, to count the number of even numbers?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int count = 1;

    for (int i = 0; i <= 100; i++)
    {
        if (i % 2 == 0)
            count += 0;  // why it will give me only 1? as output
        else
            continue;
    }
    cout << "num of even: " << count << endl;

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
  • 2
    Well if you add 0 multiple times to a number you don't get anywhere.. – drescherjm Nov 18 '18 at 16:32
  • 2
    1 + 0 == 1. What output are you expecting from that? – Carcigenicate Nov 18 '18 at 16:33
  • 2
    Did you mean count += 1 ? – Paul R Nov 18 '18 at 16:33
  • 1
    In c++ we use ++ – Killzone Kid Nov 18 '18 at 16:53
10

count += 0; // why it will give me only 1? as output

count += 0 is equivalent to count = count + 0. You're not adding anything by adding 0. So your variable stays at 1.

why did we use count++ instead

count++ differs from count += 0. It increments count by 1 and is equivalent to count += 1.

At least, with count++, you're "acknowledging that i is an even number" and therefore counting it. (Behind this is a whole land regarding context and language, which I prefer to not get into.)

Note that, there may be a huge difference between adding 0 and 1 if you were to iterate over a large list of items.

| improve this answer | |
  • your are very helpful ! thanks – Learner Feb 2 '19 at 6:03
3

We add 1 to the count, because that is how you count. You start at 0, and when you find something to count you add 1 to it.

Example:

Things to count:
      thing       thing thing             thing       thing

Counting:
      add 1       add 1 add 1             add 1       add 1
zero  one   one   two   three three three four  four  five

There are five things.

Because counting is something programmers do a lot, the people who made C++ (actually the people who made C, on which C++ is based) decided that you could write count++ to mean count += 1 (which means count = count + 1), but it's the same principle.

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3

Be aware that count++ has the same effect as count+=1. If you use count+=0, count won't change (it's the same as count=count+0).

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