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How to get an average of every 10 numbers in a big matrix (27x16800). I can't find the solution If anyone could help that would be great.

UPD Sorry, I should have been more clear. I have a matrix of recorded values (16800) for 27 subjects. Each subject corresponds to the row; I want to get a new matrix of 27 subjects with 1680 averaged numbers in rows (whereas every "old" 10 numbers in rows will be averaged to 1 "new" mean number).

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    "Every 10 numbers" in what direction? What is your expected output size? How do you want to handle the first and last 9 numbers which won't have 10 numbers around them? Please show us a minimal reproducible example to make this question clearer.
    – Wolfie
    Nov 19, 2018 at 13:13
  • Hi @Vitto ! what do you mean exactly with "every ten numbers"? Along rows? along columns? Nov 19, 2018 at 13:14
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    Sorry, I should have been more clear. I have a matrix of recorded values (16800) for 27 subjects. Each subject corresponds to the row, I want to get a new matrix of 27 subjects with 1680 averaged numbers (whereas every "old" 10 numbers in rows will be averaged to 1 "new" mean number) Nov 19, 2018 at 13:47
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    You probably want n = 10; result = permute(mean(reshape(x.', n, [], size(x,1)), 1), [3 2 1]); where x is the data matrix
    – Luis Mendo
    Nov 19, 2018 at 14:30
  • Luis, Thank you so much! That is what I needed. Nov 19, 2018 at 14:41

1 Answer 1

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Given a matrix of random data x:

x = randn(27,16800);

you can compute the average over all groups of n=10 values along the rows in two similar ways as described by Luis Mendo and Brice in comments:

y = permute(mean(reshape(x.', n, [], size(x,1)), 1), [3 2 1]); % Luis
y = squeeze(mean(reshape(x,size(x,1),n,[]),2));                % Brice

However, as noted by Wolfie, these work only if the length of the rows is exactly divisible by n.

A more general approach can be obtained by convolving:

y = conv2(x,ones(1,n)/n,'valid');
y = y(:,1:n:end);

Each matrix element in the output of the convolution is the average over n values. This result is n-1 elements shorter than the input. That is, we have computed n times as many averages as needed. The second line takes the first of every n averages, yielding an output of the expected size.

The convolution yields a result that is different from the other methods by numerical imprecision (max difference is 4.4409e-16 on my machine). This is because conv2 is implemented using SIMD instructions of your CPU, whereas mean likely is not. The convolution approach might be somewhat slower than the other approach, but it is generic and easy to adapt.

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  • Cris Luengo, thank you so much for the detailed explanation! Nov 20, 2018 at 19:41

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