-2

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I've got this code that I just compiled successfully :

template <typename T, unsigned int N>
struct Vector
{
    struct Vec1
    {
        T x;
    };

    struct Vec2 : public Vec1
    {
        T y;
    };

    struct Vec3 : public Vec2
    {
        T z;
    };

    struct Vec4 : public Vec3
    {
        T w;
    };

    template <unsigned int N>
    union Data
    {
        std::array<T, N> components;
    };

    template <>
    union Data<1>
    {
        Vec1 vec;
        std::array<T, 1> components;
    };

    template <>
    union Data<2>
    {
        Vec2 vec;
        std::array<T, 2> components;
    };

    template <>
    union Data<3>
    {
        Vec3 vec;
        std::array<T, 3> components;
    };

    template <>
    union Data<4>
    {
        Vec4 vec;
        std::array<T, 4> components;
    };

    Data<N> data;
};

It works as intended, however I would like the struct Vector to expose the data's variables as its own member variables.

Is it possible?

The solution would allow me to do Vector<int, 3> vec; vec.x ...; vec.components[0] ...;

The purpose of the union is to access easily both the vector's components as an array and individually.

Also, if you happen to know a better way to implement the templated union Data specializations, please say so as I find it kinda hard coded. It would be perfect to recursively add variables without having to add the variables of the previous specialization.

For example, I would only need to declare T x once.

marked as duplicate by Baum mit Augen c++ Nov 25 '18 at 20:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    How are you planning to use that union? You are aware that accessing any union member that wasn't used for initialization is undefined behavior, no? – πάντα ῥεῖ Nov 19 '18 at 17:43
  • 2
    What is the purpose of the union? If you are using it to access the individual elements of the array you are in for a surprise – NathanOliver Nov 19 '18 at 17:44
  • 1
    @Thecheeselover The union won't give that to you. You'll have to specialize the entire class and use reference members to the array. Or you could provide functions that have the variable name, and use those as accessors. – NathanOliver Nov 19 '18 at 17:47
  • 1
    compiled successfully - this code does not compile successfully also to access both vector components and array you will need to pack components into struct or only one of them can be active. Basically all you want to do is to add getters like get_x get_y into std::array – VTT Nov 19 '18 at 17:47
  • 1
    @Fibbles The std::array won't map properly to the other union members anyways. – πάντα ῥεῖ Nov 19 '18 at 17:52
5

I think you need to bring some clarity to your design and the code.

Use of

template <>
union Data<3>
{
    T x;
    T y;
    T z;
    std::array<T, 3> components;
};

does not sound right. You need to have {x, y, z} or components, not x, or y, or z, or components. What you need is something along the lines of

template <>
union Data<3>
{
    struct
    {
       T x;
       T y;
       T z;
    } members;
    std::array<T, 3> components;
};

Having said that, the cleanest member variable is just

    std::array<T, N> components;

As far as the member variables are concerned, Vector can be defined as:

template <typename T, unsigned int N>
struct Vector
{
   std::array<T, N> components;
};

If you need to expose the elements of components through x, y, and z-like abstractions, it will be better to add member functions.

template <typename T, unsigned int N>
struct Vector
{
   std::array<T, N> components;

   T& x()
   {
      static_assert(N > 0);
      return components[0];
   }

   T& y()
   {
      static_assert(N > 1);
      return components[1];
   }

   T& z()
   {
      static_assert(N > 2);
      return components[2];
   }
};

with the above definition of Vector, the following main function should work.

int main()
{
   Vector<int, 1> v1;
   v1.x() = 20;

   Vector<int, 2> v2;
   v2.x() = 20;
   v2.y() = 30;

   Vector<int, 3> v3;
   v3.x() = 20;
   v3.y() = 30;
   v3.z() = 40;
}

If you use

   Vector<int, 2> v2;
   v2.z() = 20;

you should get a compile-time error.

You can add the const versions of the above functions to make the member functions work with const objects too.

template <typename T, unsigned int N>
struct Vector
{
   std::array<T, N> components;

   T& x()
   {
      static_assert(N > 0);
      return components[0];
   }

   T const& x() const
   {
      static_assert(N > 0);
      return components[0];
   }

   T& y()
   {
      static_assert(N > 1);
      return components[1];
   }

   T const& y() const
   {
      static_assert(N > 1);
      return components[1];
   }

   T& z()
   {
      static_assert(N > 2);
      return components[2];
   }

   T const& z() const
   {
      static_assert(N > 2);
      return components[2];
   }
};

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