-1

I have a table [ABCTable]

When I query with

SELECT [XYZ] from [ABCTable] 

there is a possibility that [XYZ] set of rows returned might contain - [~], [!], [@], [#], [$], [%], [^], [&], [*], [,], [.] , [?].

Is there a way to write just a SQL Query (not stored procedure or sub routines) to ensure these characters are removed while selecting the needed data ?

  • Create Function that will do it for you. – slon Nov 19 '18 at 20:14
  • 2
    any reason you can't just use REPLACE for each character? – jtate Nov 19 '18 at 20:16
  • In SQL Server this is usually done using lots of nested replace because it's lacking translate and RegExp_replace :-( – dnoeth Nov 19 '18 at 20:19
  • 1
    Not quite true @dnoeth TRANSLATE (SQL Server). – Larnu Nov 19 '18 at 20:41
  • @Larnu: Great, finally available in SQL Server 2017, but why did MS implement it differently, so it can't be used to remove characters (without knowing a character which doesn't exist in the column and adding a final replace)? – dnoeth Nov 19 '18 at 21:00
4

Do you want something like

CREATE TABLE T(
  ID INT IDENTITY(1,1),
  Value VARCHAR(45)
);

INSERT INTO T(Value) VALUES
('.A*B$C@'),
('D#E$,F'),
('.G,H*I@$'); 

DECLARE @Chars VARCHAR(45) = '@$.,*#';

SELECT *, REPLACE(TRANSLATE(Value, @Chars, REPLICATE(' ', LEN(@Chars))), ' ', '') Result
FROM T;

Returns:

+----+----------+--------+
| ID |  Value   | Result |
+----+----------+--------+
|  1 | .A*B$C@  | ABC    |
|  2 | D#E$,F   | DEF    |
|  3 | .G,H*I@$ | GHI    |
+----+----------+--------+

Demo

Note: If you have WhiteSpaces there I suggest that you use CHAR(9) instead as

REPLACE(TRANSLATE(Value, @Chars, REPLICATE(CHAR(9), LEN(@Chars))), CHAR(9), '')
  • Exactly as I wrote in my comment, you need to nest it in a Replace, hopefully there's no space within the data... – dnoeth Nov 19 '18 at 21:47
  • This solution works for the sample data you provided but I would not use a space as the dummy REPLACE value. Obviously values that have spaces will get messed up. I'd go with CHAR(1) or another character that is less common. – Alan Burstein Nov 19 '18 at 23:17

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