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As a side project, I try to implement the basics of an RDF library in OCaml.

As you may (or may not) know, a RDF statement (or triple) is composed of 3 parts:

  • The subject can be an IRI or a blank node;
  • The predicate must be an IRI;
  • The object can be an IRI, a blank node or a literal.

I have module and types for IRIs, blank nodes and literals, and in order to type-proof the rules described above, here is what I've started to write:

(* In `triple.ml` *)
type subject = Iri of Iri.t | Bnode of Bnode.t
type objekt = Iri of Iri.t | Bnode of Bnode.t | Literal of Literal.t

type t = subject * Iri.t * objekt

let create s p o = s, p, o

So this is nice and everything, but one thing grinds my gears: whenever I want to use Triple.create, I must explicitly state the constructor of the variant:

let iri = (* Some Iri.t value *) in
let literal = (* Literal.t value *) in
Triple.create (Iri iri) iri (Literal literal)

I'm pretty sure OCaml has ways to work around that, but I'm not sure how.

Some thoughts: I could parameterize the Triple.t type with the type of its subject and the type of its object, but then how do I enforce the restrictions on the parameter types? Or maybe it is a good use case for a GADT?

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  • Reading back this article I had found a while back, it seems that GADT is the way to go here. I've never used them before, so this should be interesting. Nov 19, 2018 at 22:29
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    Not sure, maybe you can use inheritance instead of GADTs. I've never used OOP in Ocaml though.
    – Bergi
    Nov 20, 2018 at 8:57
  • It looks like the example should be Triple.create (Iri iri) iri (Literal literal) for it to have type t. Nov 20, 2018 at 17:58
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    Here I recommend using a record rather than a tuple. There's no downside to it since you have a type definition already. It also has the advantage of being easily extensible (you can add a field without breaking too much code) and it's easy to access just one field without having to know about the position or number of other fields. Nov 20, 2018 at 18:02
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    Another small remark: I'd use object_ instead of objekt because the same rule can be used systematically for all keywords. Nov 20, 2018 at 18:04

2 Answers 2

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If you don't mind changing the types of Iri.t, etc, you could do something like this (replacing internal = string with the real type in each case):

module Iri : sig
  type internal
  type t = [`Iri of internal]
  val v : string -> [> t]
end = struct
  type internal = string
  type t = [`Iri of internal]
  let v x = `Iri x
end

module Bnode : sig
  type internal
  type t = [`Bnode of internal]
  val v : string -> [> t]
end = struct
  type internal = string
  type t = [`Bnode of internal]
  let v x = `Bnode x
end

module Literal : sig
  type internal
  type t = [`Literal of internal]
  val v : string -> [> t]
end = struct
  type internal = string
  type t = [`Literal of internal]
  let v x = `Literal x
end

module Triple = struct
  type subject = [Iri.t | Bnode.t]
  type objekt = [Iri.t | Bnode.t | Literal.t]

  type t = subject * Iri.t * objekt

  let v s p o : t = s, p, o
end

let alice = Iri.v "alice"
let knows = Iri.v "knows"
let bob = Iri.v "bob"

let x1 = Bnode.v "blank-x1"

let foo = Literal.v "foo"

let triple1 = Triple.v alice knows bob
let triple2 = Triple.v bob knows x1
let triple3 = Triple.v bob knows foo

Note that in the example at the end, the same value bob is used both as a subject ([Iri.t | Bnode.t]) and as an object ([Iri.t | Bnode.t | Literal.t]).

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  • Thanks for your answer, this is very helpful. For Bnode and Literal, it works like a charm. For Iri however, I simply include the Uri module from the ocaml-uri package (details here). Is there a way to connect the library with this new type definition without having to redefine everything? Nov 26, 2018 at 20:12
  • You'd have to set Iri.internal = Uri.t (and users would need to use Iri.v uri to create an Iri from a Uri.t). Nov 27, 2018 at 21:08
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I'm not sure how you can fully achieve this even with GADT. What will be the type of create in this case? First argument must be either Iri.t or Bnode.t unless one is a subtype of another, you can't write such function (or it will be very general: 'a -> ...).

In any case you need to provide a type of the arguments. What you can do with GADT is to "move" the information about the types into another type:

type 'a rdf_ty = II : (Iri.t   * Iri.t)     rdf_ty |
                 BI : (Bnode.t * Iri.t)     rdf_ty |
                 IB : (Iri.t   * Bnode.t)   rdf_ty |
                 BB : (Bnode.t * Bnode.t)   rdf_ty |
                 IL : (Iri.t   * Literal.t) rdf_ty |
                 BL : (Bnode.t * Literal.t) rdf_ty

rdf_ty encode the types of the first and third arguments of create:

type t = subject * Iri.t * objekt

let create : type a b. (a * b) rdf_ty -> a -> Iri.t -> b -> t = fun ty s p o ->
    match ty with
    | II -> Iri s, p, Iri o
    | BI -> Bnode s, p, Iri o
    | IB -> Iri s, p, Bnode o
    | BB -> Bnode s, p, Bnode o
    | IL -> Iri s, p, Literal o
    | BL -> Bnode s, p, Literal o

let iri = (* Some Iri.t value *) in
let literal = (* Literal.t value *) in
create IL iri iri literal

But I really doubt that this is a better version than the original one.

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  • Yeah, I tried toying around with GADT, and I came to the same conclusions as you. Nov 20, 2018 at 9:49
  • GADTs don't eliminate any Constructors but add more strict type requirements. GADTs would only make sense if the types had some dependencies, e.g. subject and object must both be Iri or both be Bnode and such. Nov 23, 2018 at 15:16

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