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There are many things I don't understand about ipv6 and networking in general, which is why I need some further clarification on some the answers already posted to other questions. I'll list my questions, what I grasped from other answers, and what I'm still confused about.

  1. Say I have a VPS with a /56 ipv6 subnet (256 * residential /64 subnets) allotted to it. How can I programmatically find the range (prefix?) of the ip's I "own". How to get IPv4 and IPv6 address of local machine?. This is the answer I saw for this question: and what I think I understand is that I get the DNS hostname for the machine, then look up that same hostname to find the range. I'm wondering two things: How do I do this in Go, and

  2. How do I transfer this range ^ into a slice (array) of ipv6 addresses. For this specific use case: the ideal solution would be to only get one ipv6 address per \64 subnet, resulting in 256 seperate ips

  • You get all of them. And it probably does not make sense to take one IP address per subnet, but you also haven't described what you're thinking about doing. – Michael Hampton Nov 20 '18 at 3:15
  • @MichaelHampton Am aware it seems counter intuitive, but hypothetically. Maybe a better question would be: How should I separate the ips into their respective subnets. – bad Nov 20 '18 at 3:23
  • 1
    There's only one way to do that. You should definitely study the basics of IPv6 before you go any farther. – Michael Hampton Nov 20 '18 at 3:26
  • A /56 subnet consists of 2^(128-56) = 2^72 = 4.7e21 addresses. You cannot compute that slice before the sun burns out. To compute the first and last address of the subnet, set the trailing 56 bits of any address within the subnet to zero or one, respectively. – Peter Nov 20 '18 at 6:58
  • Oops, trailing 72 bits, not 56. – Peter Nov 20 '18 at 7:06
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DNS is not very helpful in determining the local IP addresses, because a DNS entry is not required to make an IP address work, nor is it required to point to (only) the machine that you happen to run your program on.

Instead, inspect the network interfaces and their configuration:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "net"
    "os"
    "text/tabwriter"
)

func main() {
    tw := tabwriter.NewWriter(os.Stdout, 0, 0, 1, ' ', 0)

    ifaces, err := net.Interfaces()
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }

    for _, iface := range ifaces {
        addrs, err := iface.Addrs()
        if err != nil {
            log.Fatal(err)
        }
        for _, addr := range addrs {
            addr, ok := addr.(*net.IPNet)
            if !ok {
                // Not an IP interface
                continue
            }
            if addr.IP.To4() != nil {
                // Skip IPv4 addresses
                continue
            }

            fmt.Fprintf(tw, "%s\t%s\t%s\t%s\n", 
                iface.Name, addr.String(), addr.IP, addr.Mask)
        }
    }
    tw.Flush()
}

For my local machine the output is:

lo          ::1/128                      ::1                       ffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff
enp2s0      fe80::52e5:49ff:fe3b:107a/64 fe80::52e5:49ff:fe3b:107a ffffffffffffffff0000000000000000
docker0     fe80::42:afff:fedb:7389/64   fe80::42:afff:fedb:7389   ffffffffffffffff0000000000000000
tun0        fe80::f22c:2d3b:a5a0:1b61/64 fe80::f22c:2d3b:a5a0:1b61 ffffffffffffffff0000000000000000
vethd176f0c fe80::1cc1:65ff:fe39:feff/64 fe80::1cc1:65ff:fe39:feff ffffffffffffffff0000000000000000

Note that these addresses are not necessarily reachable from the Internet. This all depends on how the routing of the hoster works. In any kind of cloud setup, you are almost always better off querying the providers APIs.


To list all /64 subnets in a particular /56 subnet, you have to leave the 56 upper bits of the subnet address as they are and permute the following 64-56 = 8 bits (which happens to be the eigth byte):

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "net"
)

func main() {
    _, subnet, _ := net.ParseCIDR("2001:db8::/56")
    fmt.Println(subnet)

    subnet.Mask = net.CIDRMask(64, 128) // change mask to /64

    for i := 0; i <= 0xff; i++ {
        subnet.IP[7] = byte(i) // permute the 8th byte
        fmt.Println("\t", subnet)
    }

    // Output:
    // 2001:db8::/56
    //          2001:db8::/64
    //          2001:db8:0:1::/64
    //          2001:db8:0:2::/64
    //          2001:db8:0:3::/64
    //          2001:db8:0:4::/64
    //          2001:db8:0:5::/64
    //          2001:db8:0:6::/64
    //          2001:db8:0:7::/64
    //          2001:db8:0:8::/64
    // [...]
}
  • Thank you Peter, I really appreciate the help. This stems from my lack ofo knowledge in ipv6, but how would I transform a subnet into a random ip from within it. Say for example: 2001:db8:0:3::/64, an address from within it might look like: 2001:db8:0:3::xxxx? – bad Nov 20 '18 at 19:46
  • You take 2001:db8:0:3::, leave the top 64 bits as they are, and set the remaining bits to any value you'd like. Note that this is not specific to IPv6; You simply apply a bitmask to the address (the subnet mask). The same applies to IPv4. For instance, to pick an address from 192.168.0.0/24, leave the top 24 bits as they are, and set the remaining 8 bits to any value you'd like. – Peter Nov 21 '18 at 8:53

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