282

How can I get the Cartesian product (every possible combination of values) from a group of lists?

Input:

somelists = [
   [1, 2, 3],
   ['a', 'b'],
   [4, 5]
]

Desired output:

[(1, 'a', 4), (1, 'a', 5), (1, 'b', 4), (1, 'b', 5), (2, 'a', 4), (2, 'a', 5) ...]
  • 19
    be aware that 'every possible combination' is not quite the same as 'Cartesian product', since in Cartesian products, duplicates are allowed. – Triptych Feb 10 '09 at 20:08
  • 6
    Is there a non duplicate version of cartesian product? – KJW Nov 13 '13 at 5:32
  • 11
    @KJW Yes, set(cartesian product) – NoBugs Feb 12 '15 at 7:04
  • 4
    There should be no duplicates in a Cartesian product, unless the input lists contain duplicates themselves. If you want no duplicates in the Cartesian product, use set(inputlist) over all your input lists. Not on the result. – CamilB Aug 24 '17 at 8:39

12 Answers 12

340

In Python 2.6+

import itertools
for element in itertools.product(*somelists):
    print(element)

Documentation: Python 3 - itertools.product

  • 21
    Just wanted to add the '*' character is required if you use the variable somelists as provided by the OP. – brian buck Jan 13 '11 at 22:51
  • 1
    @jaska: product() generates nitems_in_a_list ** nlists elements in the result (reduce(mul, map(len, somelists))). There is no reason to believe that yielding a single element is not O(nlists) (amortized) i.e., the time complexity is the same as for simple nested for-loops e.g., for the input in the question: nlists=3, total number of elements in the result: 3*2*2, and each element has nlists items (3 in this case). – jfs Aug 14 '15 at 22:08
  • 2
    What is the use of * before somelists? What does it do? – Vineet Kumar Doshi Aug 25 '15 at 9:04
  • 6
    @VineetKumarDoshi: Here it is used to unpcak a list into multiple arguments to the function call. Read more here: stackoverflow.com/questions/36901/… – Moberg Sep 15 '15 at 6:20
  • 4
    Note: This works only if each list contains at least one item – igo Sep 13 '17 at 12:35
74
import itertools
>>> for i in itertools.product([1,2,3],['a','b'],[4,5]):
...         print i
...
(1, 'a', 4)
(1, 'a', 5)
(1, 'b', 4)
(1, 'b', 5)
(2, 'a', 4)
(2, 'a', 5)
(2, 'b', 4)
(2, 'b', 5)
(3, 'a', 4)
(3, 'a', 5)
(3, 'b', 4)
(3, 'b', 5)
>>>
34

For Python 2.5 and older:

>>> [(a, b, c) for a in [1,2,3] for b in ['a','b'] for c in [4,5]]
[(1, 'a', 4), (1, 'a', 5), (1, 'b', 4), (1, 'b', 5), (2, 'a', 4), 
 (2, 'a', 5), (2, 'b', 4), (2, 'b', 5), (3, 'a', 4), (3, 'a', 5), 
 (3, 'b', 4), (3, 'b', 5)]

Here's a recursive version of product() (just an illustration):

def product(*args):
    if not args:
        return iter(((),)) # yield tuple()
    return (items + (item,) 
            for items in product(*args[:-1]) for item in args[-1])

Example:

>>> list(product([1,2,3], ['a','b'], [4,5])) 
[(1, 'a', 4), (1, 'a', 5), (1, 'b', 4), (1, 'b', 5), (2, 'a', 4), 
 (2, 'a', 5), (2, 'b', 4), (2, 'b', 5), (3, 'a', 4), (3, 'a', 5), 
 (3, 'b', 4), (3, 'b', 5)]
>>> list(product([1,2,3]))
[(1,), (2,), (3,)]
>>> list(product([]))
[]
>>> list(product())
[()]
  • The recursive version doesn't work if some of args are iterators. – jfs Feb 10 '09 at 21:43
19

with itertools.product:

import itertools
result = list(itertools.product(*somelists))
  • 6
    What is the use of * before somelists? – Vineet Kumar Doshi Aug 25 '15 at 9:04
  • @VineetKumarDoshi "product(somelists)" is a cartesian product between the sublists in a way that Python first get "[1, 2, 3]" as an element and then gets other element after next comman and that is linebreak so the first product term is ([1, 2, 3],), similary for the second ([4, 5],) and so "[([1, 2, 3],), ([4, 5],), ([6, 7],)]". If you wanna get a cartesian product between elements inside the tuples, you need to tell Python with Asterisk about the tuple structure. For dictionary, you use **. More here. – hhh Feb 15 '16 at 23:13
13

I would use list comprehension :

somelists = [
   [1, 2, 3],
   ['a', 'b'],
   [4, 5]
]

cart_prod = [(a,b,c) for a in somelists[0] for b in somelists[1] for c in somelists[2]]
  • 1
    I really like this solution using list comprehensions. I don't know why isn't upvoted more, it's so simple. – llekn Nov 30 '16 at 17:38
  • 12
    @llekn because the code seems to be fixed to the number of lists – Bằng Rikimaru Jan 16 '17 at 15:33
11

In Python 2.6 and above you can use 'itertools.product`. In older versions of Python you can use the following (almost -- see documentation) equivalent code from the documentation, at least as a starting point:

def product(*args, **kwds):
    # product('ABCD', 'xy') --> Ax Ay Bx By Cx Cy Dx Dy
    # product(range(2), repeat=3) --> 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111
    pools = map(tuple, args) * kwds.get('repeat', 1)
    result = [[]]
    for pool in pools:
        result = [x+[y] for x in result for y in pool]
    for prod in result:
        yield tuple(prod)

The result of both is an iterator, so if you really need a list for furthert processing, use list(result).

  • Per the documentation, the actual itertools.product implementation does NOT build intermediate results, which could be expensive. Using this technique could get out of hand quite quickly for moderately sized lists. – Triptych Feb 10 '09 at 20:05
  • 4
    i can only point the OP to the documentation, not read it for him. – user3850 Feb 10 '09 at 20:19
  • 1
    The code from the documentation is meant to demonstrate what the product function does, not as a workaround for earlier versions of Python. – Triptych Mar 10 '09 at 21:07
10

Here is a recursive generator, which doesn't store any temporary lists

def product(ar_list):
    if not ar_list:
        yield ()
    else:
        for a in ar_list[0]:
            for prod in product(ar_list[1:]):
                yield (a,)+prod

print list(product([[1,2],[3,4],[5,6]]))

Output:

[(1, 3, 5), (1, 3, 6), (1, 4, 5), (1, 4, 6), (2, 3, 5), (2, 3, 6), (2, 4, 5), (2, 4, 6)]
  • 1
    They're stored in the stack, though. – Quentin Pradet Mar 16 '15 at 11:09
  • @QuentinPradet do you mean a generator like def f(): while True: yield 1 will keep on increasing its stack size as we go through it? – Anurag Uniyal Mar 16 '15 at 22:42
  • no, but def f(): yield 1; f() will, right? – Quentin Pradet Mar 17 '15 at 10:09
  • @QuentinPradet yeah, but even in this case only the stack needed for max depth, not the whole list, so in this case stack of 3 – Anurag Uniyal Mar 17 '15 at 16:14
  • It's true, sorry. A benchmark could be interesting. :) – Quentin Pradet Mar 17 '15 at 18:24
7

Although there are many answers already, I would like to share some of my thoughts:

Iterative approach

def cartesian_iterative(pools):
  result = [[]]
  for pool in pools:
    result = [x+[y] for x in result for y in pool]
  return result

Recursive Approach

def cartesian_recursive(pools):
  if len(pools) > 2:
    pools[0] = product(pools[0], pools[1])
    del pools[1]
    return cartesian_recursive(pools)
  else:
    pools[0] = product(pools[0], pools[1])
    del pools[1]
    return pools
def product(x, y):
  return [xx + [yy] if isinstance(xx, list) else [xx] + [yy] for xx in x for yy in y]

Lambda Approach

def cartesian_reduct(pools):
  return reduce(lambda x,y: product(x,y) , pools)
  • In "Iterative Approach", why is result declared as result = [[]] I know that it is list_of_list but in general even if we have declare list_of_list we use [] and not [[]] – Sachin S Jul 16 '17 at 15:44
  • I'm a bit of a newby in terms of Pythonic solutions. Would you or some passerby please write the list comprehension in the "iterative approach" in separate loops? – Johnny Boy Dec 10 '18 at 17:03
3

A minor modification to the above recursive generator solution in variadic flavor:

def product_args(*args):
    if args:
        for a in args[0]:
            for prod in product_args(*args[1:]) if args[1:] else ((),):
                yield (a,) + prod

And of course a wrapper which makes it work exactly the same as that solution:

def product2(ar_list):
    """
    >>> list(product(()))
    [()]
    >>> list(product2(()))
    []
    """
    return product_args(*ar_list)

with one trade-off: it checks if recursion should break upon each outer loop, and one gain: no yield upon empty call, e.g.product(()), which I suppose would be semantically more correct (see the doctest).

Regarding list comprehension: the mathematical definition applies to an arbitrary number of arguments, while list comprehension could only deal with a known number of them.

2

Just to add a bit to what has already been said: if you use sympy, you can use symbols rather than strings which makes them mathematically useful.

import itertools
import sympy

x, y = sympy.symbols('x y')

somelist = [[x,y], [1,2,3], [4,5]]
somelist2 = [[1,2], [1,2,3], [4,5]]

for element in itertools.product(*somelist):
  print element

About sympy.

2

Recursive Approach:

def rec_cart(start, array, partial, results):
  if len(partial) == len(array):
    results.append(partial)
    return 

  for element in array[start]:
    rec_cart(start+1, array, partial+[element], results)

rec_res = []
some_lists = [[1, 2, 3], ['a', 'b'], [4, 5]]  
rec_cart(0, some_lists, [], rec_res)
print(rec_res)

Iterative Approach:

def itr_cart(array):
  results = [[]]
  for i in range(len(array)):
    temp = []
    for res in results:
      for element in array[i]:
        temp.append(res+[element])
    results = temp

  return results

some_lists = [[1, 2, 3], ['a', 'b'], [4, 5]]  
itr_res = itr_cart(some_lists)
print(itr_res)
0

Stonehenge approach:

def giveAllLists(a, t):
    if (t + 1 == len(a)):
        x = []
        for i in a[t]:
            p = [i]
            x.append(p)
        return x
    x = []

    out = giveAllLists(a, t + 1)
    for i in a[t]:

        for j in range(len(out)):
            p = [i]
            for oz in out[j]:
                p.append(oz)
            x.append(p)
    return x

xx= [[1,2,3],[22,34,'se'],['k']]
print(giveAllLists(xx, 0))


output:

[[1, 22, 'k'], [1, 34, 'k'], [1, 'se', 'k'], [2, 22, 'k'], [2, 34, 'k'], [2, 'se', 'k'], [3, 22, 'k'], [3, 34, 'k'], [3, 'se', 'k']]

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