9

In the following Keras and Tensorflow implementations of the training of a neural network, how model.train_on_batch([x], [y]) in the keras implementation is different than sess.run([train_optimizer, cross_entropy, accuracy_op], feed_dict=feed_dict) in the Tensorflow implementation? In particular: how those two lines can lead to different computation in training?:

keras_version.py

input_x = Input(shape=input_shape, name="x")
c = Dense(num_classes, activation="softmax")(input_x)

model = Model([input_x], [c])
opt = Adam(lr)
model.compile(loss=['categorical_crossentropy'], optimizer=opt)

nb_batchs = int(len(x_train)/batch_size)

for epoch in range(epochs):
    loss = 0.0
    for batch in range(nb_batchs):
        x = x_train[batch*batch_size:(batch+1)*batch_size]
        y = y_train[batch*batch_size:(batch+1)*batch_size]

        loss_batch, acc_batch = model.train_on_batch([x], [y])

        loss += loss_batch
    print(epoch, loss / nb_batchs)

tensorflow_version.py

input_x = Input(shape=input_shape, name="x")
c = Dense(num_classes)(input_x)

input_y = tf.placeholder(tf.float32, shape=[None, num_classes], name="label")
cross_entropy = tf.reduce_mean(
    tf.nn.softmax_cross_entropy_with_logits_v2(labels=input_y, logits=c, name="xentropy"),
    name="xentropy_mean"
)
train_optimizer = tf.train.AdamOptimizer(learning_rate=lr).minimize(cross_entropy)

nb_batchs = int(len(x_train)/batch_size)

init = tf.global_variables_initializer()
with tf.Session() as sess:
    sess.run(init)
    for epoch in range(epochs):
        loss = 0.0
        acc = 0.0

        for batch in range(nb_batchs):
            x = x_train[batch*batch_size:(batch+1)*batch_size]
            y = y_train[batch*batch_size:(batch+1)*batch_size]

            feed_dict = {input_x: x,
                         input_y: y}
            _, loss_batch = sess.run([train_optimizer, cross_entropy], feed_dict=feed_dict)

            loss += loss_batch
        print(epoch, loss / nb_batchs)

Note: This question follows Same (?) model converges in Keras but not in Tensorflow , which have been considered too broad but in which I show exactly why I think those two statements are somehow different and lead to different computation.

1 Answer 1

6
+25

Yes, the results can be different. The results shouldn't be surprising if you know the following things in advance:

  1. Implementation of corss-entropy in Tensorflow and Keras is different. Tensorflow assumes the input to tf.nn.softmax_cross_entropy_with_logits_v2 as the raw unnormalized logits while Keras accepts inputs as probabilities
  2. Implementation of optimizers in Keras and Tensorflow are different.
  3. It might be the case that you are shuffling the data and the batches passed aren't in the same order. Although it doesn't matter if you run the model for long but initial few epochs can be entirely different. Make sure same batch is passed to both and then compare the results.
3
  • Can you elaborate on how the implementation of the optimizers are different? I have tried to compute and apply the gradient my self in the tensorflow version, which has not brought better results, I was still using the optimizer class though. Items 1 and 3 are not satisfying answers in that case because 1 I feed the tf optimizer with the output of a softmax operation, which I don't with the keras one and 3 the tf model never converges whern the keras one always does.
    – LucG
    Nov 24, 2018 at 14:03
  • Compare the source code for it. Plus 1) and 3) are totally relevant. Idk what made you them irrelevenat
    – mlRocks
    Nov 24, 2018 at 14:36
  • Yes, they are relevant. I meant they are not in my specific case because 1 I feed the logits in the tf loss computation while I feed probabilities in the keras loss and 3 this stand for one run but In my case, keras code always gives convergence while the tf one never does. Yes, thank you for the "compare the source code" advice. The whole question is about comparing source code, that's the point: I am not capable enough to understand the differences yet.
    – LucG
    Nov 25, 2018 at 6:21

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