8

We're developing a fairly complex scene with a lot of moving parts, which up until now didn't involve any SVG animation.

Everything has been smooth and performing well, until we introduced an SVG with a few dashed lines that we animated using the stroke-dashoffset property.

It makes absolutely no difference in Edge or Firefox, but in Chrome the animation of the entire scene becomes choppy and sluggish.

We've even tried both means to the same end - CSS keyframes and SMIL inside the SVG element - but both perform equally poorly.

Is there a performance trick for Chrome that we're missing?

Edit: Example

Markup:

.stream {
  animation: stream 10s infinite;
}

@keyframes stream {
  100% {
    stroke-dashoffset: 100;
  }
}
<svg version="1.0" id="streams" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" x="0px" y="0px" viewBox="0 0 225.32 66.19" enable-background="new 0 0 225.32 66.19" xml:space="preserve">
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M107.38,50.54c0,0-6.78-84.52-106.51-22.2" />
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M110.49,45.31c-0.63-13.01-4.56-44.87-27.83-43.8c-27.6,1.27-37.33,39.66-38.49,60.34"/>
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M180.63,59.88c-0.69-9.65-3.6-30.18-15.76-45.51C148.44-6.34,131.85,2.22,128.87,5c-2.89,2.7-12.81,7.14-14.28,42"/>
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M118.59,45.41c2.4-10.18,9.9-31.97,30.87-37.59c26.03-6.98,55.13,9.32,72.02,19.37"/>
</svg>

7
  • are you using requestAnimationFrame?
    – Joe Warner
    Nov 20, 2018 at 18:39
  • Got an example to reproduce?
    – Chris W.
    Nov 20, 2018 at 19:03
  • We're using requestAnimationFrame for any JS animations, yeah. The SVG animations use SMIL or CSS (both of which were sluggish) so it doesn't apply there.
    – Geat
    Nov 20, 2018 at 19:13
  • anyway you can refactor your css to js animations so you can make benefits of performance optimizations, not alot you can do with css, and especially when you're not showing examples.
    – Joe Warner
    Nov 20, 2018 at 19:17
  • are you using transition or transform mostly?
    – Joe Warner
    Nov 20, 2018 at 19:20

3 Answers 3

3

duplicate of How can I animate infinite marker movement down an SVG path without very high CPU usage?

the real problem here are poor svg-implementations, see chrome bug

one workaround does reduce the frame-rate with a javascript animation, see the code sample

this particular case can be done with a dashed circle and css transform: rotate3d(). but also the "GPU transforms" translate/rotate have poor performance in today's svg implementations. workaround: wrap svg code inside a <div> and animate the div, and voila! cpu goes down to zero. related: crmarsh.com/svg-performance

const svg_elem = document.getElementById('streams')

const animateDashTime = 200 // milliseconds
let anim_dash_offset = 0
let animateDashTimer = null

function animateDashStep(){

  anim_dash_offset += 1

  svg_elem.setAttribute('style',
    '--stroke-dashoffset: '+anim_dash_offset);

  // repeat
  animateDashTimer = setTimeout(
    animateDashStep,
    animateDashTime
  )
}

// start
animateDashStep()

// stop
//clearTimeout(animateDashTimer)
<svg version="1.0" id="streams" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" x="0px" y="0px" viewBox="0 0 225.32 66.19" enable-background="new 0 0 225.32 66.19" xml:space="preserve" 

  style="--stroke-dashoffset: 0"
>
  <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" 
  
    stroke-dasharray="3,4" 
    stroke-dashoffset="var(--stroke-dashoffset)" 

    d="M107.38,50.54c0,0-6.78-84.52-106.51-22.2"
  />
  <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" stroke-dashoffset="var(--stroke-dashoffset)" d="M110.49,45.31c-0.63-13.01-4.56-44.87-27.83-43.8c-27.6,1.27-37.33,39.66-38.49,60.34"
  />
  <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" stroke-dashoffset="var(--stroke-dashoffset)" d="M180.63,59.88c-0.69-9.65-3.6-30.18-15.76-45.51C148.44-6.34,131.85,2.22,128.87,5c-2.89,2.7-12.81,7.14-14.28,42"/>
  <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" stroke-dashoffset="var(--stroke-dashoffset)" d="M118.59,45.41c2.4-10.18,9.9-31.97,30.87-37.59c26.03-6.98,55.13,9.32,72.02,19.37"/>
</svg>

1

You need to set the ease on your animation to linear. Run the snippet below to see it run without that chunky slow-down.

.stream {
  animation: stream 10s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes stream {
  100% {
    stroke-dashoffset: 100;
  }
}
<svg version="1.0" id="streams" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" x="0px" y="0px" viewBox="0 0 225.32 66.19" enable-background="new 0 0 225.32 66.19" xml:space="preserve">
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M107.38,50.54c0,0-6.78-84.52-106.51-22.2" />
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M110.49,45.31c-0.63-13.01-4.56-44.87-27.83-43.8c-27.6,1.27-37.33,39.66-38.49,60.34"/>
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M180.63,59.88c-0.69-9.65-3.6-30.18-15.76-45.51C148.44-6.34,131.85,2.22,128.87,5c-2.89,2.7-12.81,7.14-14.28,42"/>
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M118.59,45.41c2.4-10.18,9.9-31.97,30.87-37.59c26.03-6.98,55.13,9.32,72.02,19.37"/>
</svg>

2
  • That didn't solve the issue of the sluggishness (another change I made did, although I'm not sure what!) but it DID make the animation much better, so thanks for the tip!
    – Geat
    Nov 21, 2018 at 1:07
  • @Geat Did you ever figure out what change fixed the lag, and do you remember what it was? I'm having the same issue with animating stroke-dashoffset...
    – Souleste
    Jun 16, 2021 at 22:12
0

Instead of the JavaScript approach given by Mila Nautikus, you can simply use animation-timing-function: steps(n) to achieve to the same effect. Setting n to m * (how many stroke-dashoffset changed during an animation loop) for a smoother animation, for example:

.stream {
  animation: stream 0.5s steps(14) infinite;
}

@keyframes stream {
  100% {
    stroke-dashoffset: 7;
  }
}
<svg version="1.0" id="streams" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" x="0px" y="0px" viewBox="0 0 225.32 66.19" enable-background="new 0 0 225.32 66.19" xml:space="preserve">
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M107.38,50.54c0,0-6.78-84.52-106.51-22.2" />
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M110.49,45.31c-0.63-13.01-4.56-44.87-27.83-43.8c-27.6,1.27-37.33,39.66-38.49,60.34"/>
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M180.63,59.88c-0.69-9.65-3.6-30.18-15.76-45.51C148.44-6.34,131.85,2.22,128.87,5c-2.89,2.7-12.81,7.14-14.28,42"/>
      <path class="stream" fill="none" stroke="#000" stroke-width="1.75" stroke-linecap="round" stroke-miterlimit="10" stroke-dasharray="3,4" d="M118.59,45.41c2.4-10.18,9.9-31.97,30.87-37.59c26.03-6.98,55.13,9.32,72.02,19.37"/>
</svg>

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.