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This image is the task I should do:

i should calculate this serie

Whatever I enter between -1 and 1, the outputs are always 1.0000 or 2.0000. How can I do solve this problem? Below I attached my code.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>


int main() {

    int i;
    float x;
    float sum=0;


    printf ("enter an x\n");
    scanf ("%f",&x);

    if ((x>-1)&&(x<1))
    {
         for (i=0;i<101;i++)
         sum= sum + (pow(x,i));
    }    

    printf ("result=%f",sum);
    return 0;
}
  • 1
    "But my code is not working." That's not a good description of our problem. What is not working? Which output do you expect? Which output do you get? – M Oehm Nov 20 '18 at 21:20
  • you need a float for x but you scanf an int – deamentiaemundi Nov 20 '18 at 21:24
  • if you are not planning to use integer please change the format of X to float or double and change the" scanf " function like this scanf("%f", &x); or change your if ((x>-1) && (x<1)) statements. Only valid integer is 0 in this scenario – Cagri Candan Nov 20 '18 at 21:29
  • i changed x to float but it still doesn`t give the right answer @deamentiaemundi @Cagri Candan – noob Nov 20 '18 at 21:54
  • 1
    @noob that's just caused by loss of precision. With x = 0.5 and n=100that series gives you 1.9999999999999999999999999999992111390947789881945882714347172137703267935648909769952297210693359375 which is outside of the precision of the type float. Just try with a smaller n say n = 10 or with a much smaller x say x = 0.001 – deamentiaemundi Nov 21 '18 at 1:06
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if ((x>-1)&&(x<1))

With this case your code will work only if x is zero so try removing if statement and do mention what output you expect for given particular input, it will be bit more helpful to answer it.

Try this code:

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <math.h> 
int main() { 
    int i; float x; 
    float sum=0; 

    printf ("enter an x\n"); 
    scanf ("%f",&x); 
    for (i=0 ;i<101; i++) 
        sum+= (pow(x,i)); 

    printf ("result=%f",sum); 
    return 0;
}
  • x had to be a float! – Mike Nov 21 '18 at 6:55
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Even upon using a type like double you haven't got enough numerical precision to sum all the powers up to 100.

Executing the following snippet, you'll notice that, while the correct (numerically speaking) result is evaluated, the loop stops way before the 100th iteration, typically at 16:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <float.h>

// Analytically calculates the limit for n -> inf of the series of powers
double sum_of_powers_limit(double x)
{
    return 1.0 / (1.0 - x);
}

int main(void)
{
    double x = 0.1;
    const int N = 100;
    double sum = 1.0;

    for (int i = 1; i <= N; ++i)
    {
        double old_sum = sum;
        sum = sum + pow(x,i);

        if (old_sum == sum)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "Numerical precision limit reached at i = %d\n", i);
            break;
        }
    }

    printf("  result = %.*e\n", DBL_DECIMAL_DIG, sum);
    printf("expected = %.*e\n", DBL_DECIMAL_DIG, sum_of_powers_limit(x));

    return 0;
}

Also note that a more efficient way to evaluate this kind of polynomials is the Horner's method:

// Evaluates the sum s(x) = 1 + x + x^2 + ... + x^n using Horner's method
// It stops when it cannot update the value anymore
double sum_of_powers(double x, int n)
{
    double result = 1.0;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        double old_result = result;
        result = 1.0 + x * result;

        if (old_result == result)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "Numerical precision limit reached at i = %d\n", i);
            break;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

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