I have many strings. Each string is prepended with at least 1 $. What is the best way to loop through the chars of each string to count how many $'s there are per string.

eg:

"$hello" - 1
"$$hello" - 2
"$$h$ello" - 2

12 Answers 12

You could use the Count method

var count = mystring.Count(x => x == '$')
  • Is this not better (simpler and/or faster) than using TakeWhile()? – Jimmy Jun 4 '13 at 19:14
  • 1
    No because, as Jon points out in his comment thread, this counts all $ and not just the leading ones. – DocMax Jul 8 '13 at 17:15
  • 5
    In case it's not obvious, you will need to add a "using System.Linq;" to your class file, or you'll get the 'string has no definition for Count' error. – Mason G. Zhwiti Sep 19 '13 at 18:49
int count = myString.TakeWhile(c => c == '$').Count();

And without LINQ

int count = 0;
while(count < myString.Length && myString[count] == '$') count++;
  • you're missing the declaration for i and also incrementing it in your while loop. A for loop might make things tidier. – Ahmad Mageed Mar 17 '11 at 14:59
  • @Ahmad my fault, had an i counter at first, didn't change everything. Still like the while though. – Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 17 '11 at 15:05
  • 1
    Excellent. Thanks Yuriy. I just wanted to point out the importance of using '$' and not "$"... ;) – reido113 Mar 11 '13 at 18:34
  • 1
    @Shaggy The question is confusing. If you look at the example or the title, I've answered it, if you read the description I'm wrong. – Yuriy Faktorovich May 20 '13 at 20:49
  • 1
    @Jimmy those are two different answers. TakeWhile gets how many $ it start with while Count will take the total. – Yuriy Faktorovich Jun 6 '13 at 13:59

The simplest approach would be to use LINQ:

var count = text.TakeWhile(c => c == '$').Count();

There are certainly more efficient approaches, but that's probably the simplest.

  • 1
    Hey jon, this is sort of a offtopic question but you seem to know a lot: In what situation would one not use linq? I'm a noobie programmer and I was wondering because (as in this context) I think it would be the best way.? – Theun Arbeider Mar 17 '11 at 15:08
  • 2
    @Levisaxos: If you really needed the fastest possible performance, there are better alternatives. Or if you're working on .NET 2 and don't need LINQ elsewhere. That's just talking about this case though - there are plenty of places where you can use LINQ, but it actually makes the code more complicated instead of simpler. – Jon Skeet Mar 17 '11 at 15:10
  • Thank you for explaining :) – Theun Arbeider Mar 17 '11 at 15:22
  • 2
    How about var count = text.Count(t => t == '$'); – Steve Chadbourne Mar 11 '13 at 22:45
  • 2
    @SteveChadbourne: No, that would just count the number of dollars in total. – Jon Skeet Mar 11 '13 at 22:48
int count = yourText.Length - yourText.TrimStart('$').Length;
  • Though the OP is somewhat ambiguous in regard to stating "to count how many $'s there are per string." Does he mean how many in the string, or how many at the beginning of the string? (Though he does show a count of 2 in the third example.) – Steve Greene Dec 9 '15 at 7:35
int count = Regex.Matches(myString,"$").Count;
  • 2
    This will count all occurrences of '$', not just the ones at the beginning. From the OP's example, this would fail the third test case. – Darthfett Mar 9 '12 at 14:39
  • @Darthfett, I don't see how? He said each string is prepended with one $ and he wants to know how many after that, so this is the correct answer. – KyloRen Oct 4 '17 at 1:48
  • @KyloRen When I wrote the comment, it seemed clear to me that the question was asking how many $ appear at the beginning of the string. Now it is not as clear. – Darthfett Oct 4 '17 at 14:30
  • @Darthfett, looking at the edits, I see what you mean now. – KyloRen Oct 4 '17 at 22:24

You could do this, it doesn't require LINQ, but it's not the best way to do it(since you make split the whole string and put it in an array and just pick the length of it, you could better just do a while loop and check every character), but it works.

int count = test.Split('$').Length - 1;
  • For me the best solution in terms of computation time – Dallas Feb 16 '17 at 10:32
var str ="hello";
str.Where(c => c == 'l').Count()  // 2
  • 5
    This enumerates the string twice, whereas str.Count(c => c == 'l'); will only enumerate the string once. And that is basically the same answer as the accepted one. – oopbase Mar 3 '17 at 15:48
        public static int GetHowManyTimeOccurenceCharInString(string text, char c)
        {
            int count = 0;
            foreach(char ch in text)
            {
                if(ch.Equals(c))
                {
                    count++;
                }

            }
            return count;
        }
  • I'm guessing here, but I suspect this is actually significantly more efficient than using LINQ (or Regex). I'd also be curious if you replaced the foreach loop with an iterator (for (int i=0; i<text.Length; ++i)), replacing ch with text[i], if that would even crank up the efficiency just a little bit. – Steve Greene Dec 9 '15 at 7:39

This is a similar Solution to find how many email addresses included in a string. This way is more efficient`

        int count = 0;
        foreach (char c in email.Trim())
            if (c == '@') count++;

//This code worked for me

class CountOfLettersOfString
{
    static void Main()
    {

        Console.WriteLine("Enter string to check count of letters");
        string name = Console.ReadLine();

        //Method1
        char[] testedalphabets = new char[26];
        int[] letterCount = new int[26];
        int countTestesd = 0;
        Console.WriteLine($"Given String is:{name}");

        for (int i = 0; i < name.Length - 1; i++)
        {
            int countChar = 1;

            bool isCharTested = false;

            for (int j = 0; j < testedalphabets.Length - 1; j++)
            {
                if (name[i] == testedalphabets[j])
                {
                    isCharTested = true;
                    break;
                }
            }

            if (!isCharTested)
            {
                testedalphabets[countTestesd] = name[i];

                for (int k = i + 1; k < name.Length - 1; k++)
                {
                    if (name[i] == name[k])
                    {
                        countChar++;
                    }
                }
                letterCount[countTestesd] = countChar;
                countTestesd++;

            }
            else
            {
                continue;
            }
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < testedalphabets.Length - 1; i++)
        {
            if (!char.IsLetter(testedalphabets[i]))
            {
                continue;
            }
            Console.WriteLine($"{testedalphabets[i]}-{letterCount[i]}");
        }


        //Method2
        var g = from c in name.ToLower().ToCharArray() // make sure that L and l are the same eg
                group c by c into m
                select new { Key = m.Key, Count = m.Count() };

        foreach (var item in g)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Character:{0} Appears {1} times", item.Key.ToString(), item.Count));
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

just a simple answer:

    public static int CountChars(string myString, char myChar)
    {
        int count = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < myString.Length; i++)
        {
            if (myString[i] == myChar) ++count;
        }
        return count;
    }

Cheers! - Rick

One approach you could take is the following method:

// Counts how many of a certain character occurs in the given string
public static int CharCountInString(char chr, string str)
{
    return str.Split(chr).Length-1;
}

As per the parameters this method returns the count of a specific character within a specific string.

This method works by splitting the string into an array by the specified character and then returning the length of that array -1.

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