12

I have an enum with descriptions as String. This is the enum.

public enum tabs
{
    A("Actual data"),
    B("Bad data"),
    C("Can data"),
    D("Direct data");

    private String description;
    tabs(String desc)
    {
        this.description = desc;
    }


    public String getDescription()
    {
        return this.description;
    }
}

Now, if I need the data for A, I'd just do

tabs.A.description

I am in the process of creating a generic method to return the values.

I have managed to utilize the below generic method to accept an enum type as the argument. It returns an array of the enum constants. But I actually want it to return an array of the values.. ie {"Actual data", "Bad data", "Can data", "Direct data"}.

public static String[] getActualTabs(Class<? extends Enum<?>> e) 
{
    return Arrays.stream(e.getEnumConstants()).map(Enum::name).toArray(String[]::new);
}

What options do I have to achieve this?

  • 1
    Suggestion to improvement: In Java, the classes are capitalized, e.g., String, Integer, and Class. Enum is just a constant class so tabs should be Tabs. – Little Helper Nov 21 '18 at 9:39
11

You can pass a mapper Function to map enum constants into Strings:

public static <T extends Enum<T>> String[] getActualTabs(Class<T> e, Function<? super T, String> mapper) 
{
    return Arrays.stream(e.getEnumConstants()).map(mapper).toArray(String[]::new);
}

Usage:

System.out.println(Arrays.toString(getActualTabs(tabs.class,tabs::getDescription)));

Output:

[Actual data, Bad data, Can data, Direct data]
  • This definitely works. Thanks. I do have a related question though. Let's say I have to pass in different enums. What becomes of the mapper argument then? tabs.class is one enum. Let's say I also have servers.class as another enum. And I have to pass in a generic for the mapper argument. How do I tackle such a situation? How can tabs:getDescription be also converted into generic? I mean I want to get rid of the hardcoded tabs::getDescription and make it so such that I can pass in any enum... sort of like: <enum.name>::getDescription – SteroidKing666 Nov 21 '18 at 7:05
  • 2
    @SteroidKing666 Using a mapper Function argument gives you more flexibility. For tabs you want to obtain the values of getDescription(). For some other enum, you might want to obtain the values of a different property (say getColor()). If your server enum also has getDescription(), you can pass server::getDescription. If you only want to support getDescription() method, you can use something like Mureinik's answer (i.e. require that the enum implement some interface). – Eran Nov 21 '18 at 7:11
  • 2
    @SteroidKing666 if you are concerned about having to specify the enum name in the method reference, you can use a lambda expression instead : replace tabs::getDescription with e -> e.getDescription(). This will work for any enum that has a getDescription method that returns a String. – Eran Nov 21 '18 at 7:23
  • Okay so getActualTabs(enumName,e->getDescription()) should work. What if enumName is of type Class<? extends Enum<?>> class1 ? That is, I am accepting class1 as a generic enum into a method. And then passing that generic enum class1 into getActualTabs. Because then getActualTabs(class1,e->getDescription()) wouldn't work. – SteroidKing666 Nov 21 '18 at 7:48
  • 1
    @Eran Just found out it on my own: .getEnumConstants() is a method for all Class<>es. If it is not an enum type, it just returns null, so your function throws a NPE. So while the <T extends Enum<T>> isn't absolutely necessary to make it compile, it is better to have it, because it prevents NPEs on misuse. – glglgl Nov 21 '18 at 8:43
4

I'd first pull getDescription out to an interface and make sure all your project's enums implement it:

public interface HasDescription {
    String getDescription();
}

And then, use it in your generic method:

public static String[] getActualTabs(Class<? extends Enum<?> & HasDescription> e) {
    return Arrays.stream(e.getEnumConstants())
                 .map(HasDescription::getDescription)
                 .toArray(String[]::new);
}
  • I get the idea. But somehow I am getting the following error: Incorrect number of arguments for type Class<T>; it cannot be parameterized with arguments <? extends Enum<?>, Script1.HasDescription>. My enums and the HasDescription interface are all within the same class. – SteroidKing666 Nov 21 '18 at 8:11
  • 1
    I think you'll have to re-write this with a generic type variable, since wildcards can only have a single type bound (i.e. Class<? extends Enum<?> & HasDescription> e doesn't pass compilation) – Eran Nov 21 '18 at 9:00
0

Both answers are quite beautiful.

But there is another variant which might be more superior because it is even more widely usable:

public static <T> String[] getActualTabs(T[] values, Function<? super T, String> mapper) {
    return Arrays.stream(values)
                 .map(mapper)
                 .toArray(String[]::new);
}

public static <T extends HasDescription> String[] getActualTabs(T[] values) {
    return Arrays.stream(values)
                 .map(HasDescription::getDescription)
                 .toArray(String[]::new);
    // or just: return getActualTabs(values, HasDescription::getDescription);
}

This implementation has the benefit that we don't have to mess around with reflection.

Instead, you would call them this way:

String[] tabs1 = getActualTabs(Tabs.values())
String[] tabs2 = getActualTabs(Tabs.values(), Tabs::getDescription)

Note that it might be useful to rename the functions, e. g. getStringifiedValues() or toDescriptions().

Disclaimer: untested, but should work, IMHO.

  • How would I implement this if I have another generic method called private <T> void verifyTabData(Class<? extends Enum<?>> class1) which holds the getActualTabs method? I am passing in different sets of enums into this root method. – SteroidKing666 Nov 21 '18 at 9:26
  • @SteroidKing666 If all what makes the difference is the list of values, you can work with {EnumType}.values() everywhere. If you are restricted to this signature, you can call .values() resp. .getEnumConstants() in this function. Or you would resort to the original alternative in order not to disturb the original concept completely. – glglgl Nov 21 '18 at 10:46

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