73

While writing this method for a custom NUnit Constraint.

    private void AddMatchFailure<TExpected, TActual>(string failureName, TExpected expected, TActual actual)
    {
        _matchFailures.Add(
            String.Format(MatchFailureFormat, failureName,
            (expected == null) ? "null" : expected.ToString(),
            (actual == null) ? "null" : actual.ToString()));
    }

Resharper warns that expected and actual might be ValueType objects.

e.g. TExpected is DateTime
   expected == null;//  but DateTime is a struct.

What are the rules when comparing a ValueType to null and how should I write the method to account for that without limiting the generic parameters by adding a class constraint?

4 Answers 4

82

Don't change the code - just ignore the warning. If the type parameter is a non-nullable value type, the comparison will always fail and it'll always call ToString() instead. I don't know whether it's actually JITted away, but I wouldn't be surprised... and this doesn't sound like it's performance-critical code anyway :)

I'd personally leave the warning "on", but ignore it in this particular case - possibly with a comment.

I think I came across the same warning a few times when reimplementing LINQ to Objects.

13
  • 65
    I've added "// I have Mr. Skeets express permission to ignore this warning." seems to do the trick :)
    – Grokodile
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:07
  • 19
    @panamack: Could I request an apostrophe in "Skeet's"? Ta.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:09
  • 66
    certainly, "// I have Mr. Skeet(TODO add apostrophe here)s express permission to ignore this warning."
    – Grokodile
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:29
  • 15
    It's worth noting that if someone is truly bothered by the error message, they could always do Object.ReferenceEquals(objA, null) which is really just calling objA == objB in the .NET source code. And, I'm pretty sure that this will be JITted or inlined somehow. The nice thing is that the error message disappears though, and the call is still valid :)
    – myermian
    Commented Jul 31, 2013 at 21:10
  • 5
    For completeness, Eric Lippert said that the JIT does in fact replace a "val == null" check with "false" when compiling the method for a type parameter that's a non-nullable value type.
    – Joe Amenta
    Commented Jan 18, 2015 at 14:36
6

What are the rules when comparing a ValueType to null and how should I write the method to account for that without limiting the generic parameters by adding a class constraint?

If you do not know that they will be reference types, then you can say

private void AddMatchFailure<TExpected, TActual>(
    string failureName,
    TExpected expected,
    TActual actual
) {
    _matchFailures.Add(
        String.Format(MatchFailureFormat, failureName,
        IsDefault<TExpected>(expected) ? DefaultStringForType<TExpected>() : expected.ToString(),
        IsDefault<TActual>(actual) ? DefaultStringForType<TActual>() : actual.ToString()
    );
}

private bool IsDefault<T>(T value) {
    if(typeof(T).IsValueType) {
        return default(T).Equals(value);
    }
    else {
        return Object.Equals(null, value);
    }
}

private string DefaultStringForType<T>() {
    if(typeof(T).IsValueType) {
        return default(T).ToString();
    }
    else {
        return "null";
    }
}
7
  • But I think he wants to compare to null. Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:11
  • @CodeInChaos: default of a reference type is null.
    – jason
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:14
  • 1
    @Jason but it isn't null for a non nullable value type. It makes sense for the comparison to simply become a constant false for types without null. And that's probably the desired behavior for the OPs code. Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:17
  • @CodeInChaos: default(Nullable<T>) where T is a non-nullable value type is the instance of Nullable<T> where Nullable<T>.HasValue is false (i.e., it is null).
    – jason
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:22
  • 1
    @Jason I know that, and that's unrelated to my objection to your code. Your DefaultStringForType doesn't handle a Nullable<T> that's null correctly. And even apart from that the OP's code is much cleaner than yours. Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 18:20
2

I'm using something like this to check for null on generic types:

if (Equals(result, Default(T)))
3
  • 9
    Be careful! default(int) is 0, which can be a valid and explicitly set value. Checking for default(T) is quite different from checking for null.
    – ANeves
    Commented Dec 10, 2013 at 21:26
  • 1
    +1 to @ANeves, resharper suggest this in there help page and to me it code smells confluence.jetbrains.com/display/ReSharper/… Commented Sep 17, 2014 at 12:29
  • I also hate that example because it is clearly a case where most people would want 0.ToString() to be called... Commented Sep 25, 2014 at 7:15
-3
private void AddMatchFailure<TExpected, TActual>(string failureName, TExpected expected, TActual actual)
{
    _matchFailures.Add(
        String.Format(MatchFailureFormat, failureName,
        (expected == default(TExpected)) ? "null" : expected.ToString(),
        (actual == default(TActual)) ? "null" : actual.ToString()));
}

Should do it.

default(T) gives the default value for that type, for reference types that's null - for others it depends. (Enums it's the equivalent of (enumType)0 for example).

5
  • 2
    Then it will print "null" instead of 0 if you're comparing integers. Way to make a test failure hard to understand ;)
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:01
  • That gives me a compiler warning "Cannot apply operator == to operands of type 'TExpected' and 'TExpected'"
    – Grokodile
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:03
  • @Jon this is true, but it's the only way to get rid of the warning that fits the parameters. :p
    – Massif
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:03
  • 2
    The question doesn't ask how to get rid of the warning. It asks what to do about it :)
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:07
  • @Jon - fair enough... (now, where's the emoticon for "graciously concede")
    – Massif
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 15:19

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