34

I'm going through the Khan Academy course on Statistics as a bit of a refresher from my college days, and as a way to get me up to speed on pandas & other scientific Python.

I've got a table that looks like this from Khan Academy:

             | Undergraduate | Graduate | Total
-------------+---------------+----------+------
Straight A's |           240 |       60 |   300
-------------+---------------+----------+------
Not          |         3,760 |      440 | 4,200
-------------+---------------+----------+------
Total        |         4,000 |      500 | 4,500

I would like to recreate this table using pandas. Of course I could create a DataFrame using something like

"Graduate": {...},
"Undergraduate": {...},
"Total": {...},

But that seems like a naive approach that would both fall over quickly and just not really be extensible.

I've got the non-totals part of the table like this:

df = pd.DataFrame(
    {
        "Undergraduate": {"Straight A's": 240, "Not": 3_760},
        "Graduate": {"Straight A's": 60, "Not": 440},
    }
)
df

I've been looking and found a couple of promising things, like:

df['Total'] = df.sum(axis=1)

But I didn't find anything terribly elegant.

I did find the crosstab function that looks like it should do what I want, but it seems like in order to do that I'd have to create a dataframe consisting of 1/0 for all of these values, which seems silly because I've already got an aggregate.

I have found some approaches that seem to manually build a new totals row, but it seems like there should be a better way, something like:

totals(df, rows=True, columns=True)

or something.

Does this exist in pandas, or do I have to just cobble together my own approach?

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48

Or in two steps, using the .sum() function as you suggested (which might be a bit more readable as well):

import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame( {"Undergraduate": {"Straight A's": 240, "Not": 3_760},"Graduate": {"Straight A's": 60, "Not": 440},})

#Total sum per column: 
df.loc['Total',:]= df.sum(axis=0)

#Total sum per row: 
df.loc[:,'Total'] = df.sum(axis=1)

Output:

              Graduate  Undergraduate  Total
Not                440           3760   4200
Straight A's        60            240    300
Total              500           4000   4500
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  • Huh... this is giving me some weird output though - 3760+440 isn't 8400, but that's what it's showing?? – Wayne Werner Nov 21 '18 at 15:20
  • That's weird, I get 4200 as it is supposed to? Maybe a typo? – Archie Nov 21 '18 at 15:22
  • 8
    @WayneWerner that is because this is an in place operation. It seems you've run it twice – piRSquared Nov 21 '18 at 15:23
  • Ah, I must have accidentally hit ctrl+enter in my notebook. This time I made a copy to operate on :) – Wayne Werner Nov 21 '18 at 15:27
13

append and assign

The point of this answer is to provide an in line and not an in place solution.

append

I use append to stack a Series or DataFrame vertically. It also creates a copy so that I can continue to chain.

assign

I use assign to add a column. However, the DataFrame I'm working on is in the in between nether space. So I use a lambda in the assign argument which tells Pandas to apply it to the calling DataFrame.


df.append(df.sum().rename('Total')).assign(Total=lambda d: d.sum(1))

              Graduate  Undergraduate  Total
Not                440           3760   4200
Straight A's        60            240    300
Total              500           4000   4500

Fun alternative

Uses drop with errors='ignore' to get rid of potentially pre-existing Total rows and columns.

Also, still in line.

def tc(d):
  return d.assign(Total=d.drop('Total', errors='ignore', axis=1).sum(1))

df.pipe(tc).T.pipe(tc).T

              Graduate  Undergraduate  Total
Not                440           3760   4200
Straight A's        60            240    300
Total              500           4000   4500
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4

From the original data using crosstab, if just base on your input, you just need melt before crosstab

s=df.reset_index().melt('index')
pd.crosstab(index=s['index'],columns=s.variable,values=s.value,aggfunc='sum',margins=True)
Out[33]: 
variable      Graduate  Undergraduate   All
index                                      
Not                440           3760  4200
Straight A's        60            240   300
All                500           4000  4500

Toy data

df=pd.DataFrame({'c1':[1,2,2,3,4],'c2':[2,2,3,3,3],'c3':[1,2,3,4,5]}) 
# before `agg`, I think your input is the result after `groupby` 
df
Out[37]: 
   c1  c2  c3
0   1   2   1
1   2   2   2
2   2   3   3
3   3   3   4
4   4   3   5


pd.crosstab(df.c1,df.c2,df.c3,aggfunc='sum',margins
=True)
Out[38]: 
c2     2     3  All
c1                 
1    1.0   NaN    1
2    2.0   3.0    5
3    NaN   4.0    4
4    NaN   5.0    5
All  3.0  12.0   15
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2

The original data is:

>>> df = pd.DataFrame(dict(Undergraduate=[240, 3760], Graduate=[60, 440]), index=["Straight A's", "Not"])
>>> df
Out: 
              Graduate  Undergraduate
Straight A's        60            240
Not                440           3760

You can only use df.T to achieve recreating this table:

>>> df_new = df.T
>>> df_new
Out: 
               Straight A's   Not
Graduate                 60   440
Undergraduate           240  3760

After computing the Total by row and columns:

>>> df_new.loc['Total',:]= df_new.sum(axis=0)
>>> df_new.loc[:,'Total'] = df_new.sum(axis=1)
>>> df_new
Out: 
               Straight A's     Not   Total
Graduate               60.0   440.0   500.0
Undergraduate         240.0  3760.0  4000.0
Total                 300.0  4200.0  4500.0
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