5
print('a' in 'aa')
print('a' in 'aa' == True)
print(('a' in 'aa') == True)
print('a' in ('aa' == True))

The output is

True
False
True
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "main.py", line 6, in <module>
    print('a' in ('aa' == True))
TypeError: argument of type 'bool' is not iterable

If line 2 is neither line 3 nor line 4, then what is it? How does it get False?

8
  • @PatrickArtner I'm finding it unusually difficult to find the canonical I'm thinking of. It's due to chaining but I can't find the link :/ – roganjosh Nov 21 '18 at 18:23
  • That's the one you originally flagged with but I'm sure there is a canonical. Where is it?! :P – roganjosh Nov 21 '18 at 18:25
  • @roganjosh this here? stackoverflow.com/questions/6074018/… – Patrick Artner Nov 21 '18 at 18:27
  • 1
    @PatrickArtner it got hammered and they presumably decided to reverse that, but now it shows no close votes to me. – roganjosh Nov 21 '18 at 18:42
  • 1
    @PatrickArtner i saw timgeb as the second closer. It must be a hammer. I'm not sure how to view that history, though. – roganjosh Nov 21 '18 at 18:46
8

According to Expressions

print('a' in 'aa' == True)

is evaluated as

'a' in 'aa' and 'aa' == True

which is False.

See

print("a" in "aa" and "aa" == True)

==> False

The rest is trivial - it helps to keep operator precedence in mind to figure them out.


Similar ones:

with different statements. I flagged for dupe but the UI is wonky - I answered non the less to explain why yours exactly printed what it did.

1

Case 1 : it's simple the answers is True.

print('a' in 'aa')

Case 2 : This operation is evaluated as 'a' in 'aa' and 'aa' == True, so obviously it will return false.

print('a' in 'aa' == True)

Case 3: Now because we have () enclosing ('a' in 'aa') and the precedence of () is highest among all so first 'a' in 'aa' is evaluated as True and then True == True

print(('a' in 'aa') == True)

Case 4 : Same as above because of precedence of (), its evaluated as 'aa' == True, which will result in error as it tries to apply in on a non iterable that is bool value.

print('a' in ('aa' == True))
2
  • 1
    comparing a string with a bool is perfectly fine - the error is trying to use in on a non iterable bool type ... – Patrick Artner Nov 21 '18 at 18:32
  • Comparing a string to a Boolean does not throw an error. – roganjosh Nov 21 '18 at 18:32

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