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If i have 0x00000065 stored in a register, is that the same as having 0X65 in my register?

Thank you so much.

  • 4
    yes. The leading zeros contribute nothing to the real value – phuclv Nov 22 '18 at 0:11
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    It's the same with the denary numbers you're used to, if you have $2 or $0000002 you have the same amount of money. – Colin Nov 22 '18 at 7:55
  • what does this have to do with assembly, and if it is an assembly question show the assembly and indicate which assembler you are using as the assembler determines how numbers are interpreted/used not the target instruction set. – old_timer Nov 22 '18 at 14:55
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Yes, it's the same two hexadecimal values:

0x00000065 = 5*(16^0) + 6*(16^1) + 0*(16^2) + ... + 0*(16^7) = 5*(16^0) + 6*(16^1) = 0x65

(Note: the symbol '^' denotes the power operator)

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Registers are 32 bits long so you can't have 0x65 in one, only 0x00000065.

But of course, these are equal numbers.

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