273

I use this

@"^([\w\.\-]+)@([\w\-]+)((\.(\w){2,3})+)$"

regexp to validate the email

([\w\.\-]+) - this is for the first-level domain (many letters and numbers, also point and hyphen)

([\w\-]+) - this is for second-level domain

((\.(\w){2,3})+) - and this is for other level domains(from 3 to infinity) which includes a point and 2 or 3 literals

what's wrong with this regex?

EDIT:it doesn't match the "[email protected]" email

7
  • 1
    Other than you're not including valid characters, as specified by the RFCs 5321 & 5322--nothing. Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 16:53
  • 2
    possible duplicate of What is the best regular expression for validating email addresses?
    – RB.
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 16:53
  • I think you have to tell us what's wrong and then others here can help you fixing the wrong thing.
    – Uwe Keim
    Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 16:53
  • 14
    You have a problem -> you think 'regex' -> now you have 2 problems ;-) Commented Mar 17, 2011 at 19:03
  • 3
    Just a comment about your regex. With these new .amsterdam, .info and other domains the regex should be:@"^([\w\.\-]+)@([\w\-]+)((\.(\w){2,})+)$""
    – Ton Snoei
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 5:43

37 Answers 37

495

TLD's like .museum aren't matched this way, and there are a few other long TLD's. Also, you can validate email addresses using the MailAddress class as Microsoft explains here in a note:

Instead of using a regular expression to validate an email address, you can use the System.Net.Mail.MailAddress class. To determine whether an email address is valid, pass the email address to the MailAddress.MailAddress(String) class constructor.

public bool IsValid(string emailaddress)
{
    try
    {
        MailAddress m = new MailAddress(emailaddress);

        return true;
    }
    catch (FormatException)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

This saves you a lot af headaches because you don't have to write (or try to understand someone else's) regex.

EDIT: For those who are allergic to try/catch: In .NET 5 you can use MailAddress.TryCreate. See also https://stackoverflow.com/a/68198658, including an example how to fix .., spaces, missing .TLD, etc.

13
  • 88
    This didn't catch double dots ".." nor inline spaces ". ". I'll go with the regex instead Commented Feb 28, 2012 at 15:27
  • 46
    Despite this is a popular answer. It is not right, fail to catch at least two invalid formats: "[email protected]" , "[email protected]"
    – sean717
    Commented Aug 22, 2012 at 5:22
  • 13
    @sean717: See the RFC and/or link. I agree that your examples probably won't work in the real world, but that doesn't make them invalid. Commented Aug 27, 2012 at 18:53
  • 14
    Whether it is working or not using try catch to validate input is not recommended practice. Regex is definitely better way to go.
    – mrt
    Commented Oct 10, 2012 at 11:00
  • 182
    -1 Bad piece of code. Catching an exception is not the way to validate fields.
    – ken2k
    Commented Jan 11, 2013 at 10:24
120

I think @"^([\w\.\-]+)@([\w\-]+)((\.(\w){2,3})+)$" should work.
You need to write it like

string email = txtemail.Text;
Regex regex = new Regex(@"^([\w\.\-]+)@([\w\-]+)((\.(\w){2,3})+)$");
Match match = regex.Match(email);
if (match.Success)
    Response.Write(email + " is correct");
else
    Response.Write(email + " is incorrect");

Be warned that this will fail if:

  1. There is a subdomain after the @ symbol.

  2. You use a TLD with a length greater than 3, such as .info

12
  • 3
    Returns [email protected] as valid. Should be invalid.
    – Mathias F
    Commented Jun 4, 2013 at 14:48
  • 8
    I believe this will fail on the new TLD's that are being issued, as you can have TLD's with more than 3 characters now.
    – AaronLS
    Commented Jul 22, 2013 at 19:04
  • This regex allows "[email protected]" as valid.
    – prem30488
    Commented May 9, 2014 at 9:48
  • 16
    gmail.com.in.in.in.in is a perfectly valid domain name, so I can't see why it shouldn't be allowed?
    – larsw
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 10:14
  • 1
    To allow longer TLDs just remove the "3": new Regex(@"^([\w\.\-]+)@([\w\-]+)((\.(\w){2,})+)$");. I think this is a good solution if you only want a basic validation. If you want RFC validation then you shouldn't use it.
    – fsinisi90
    Commented Aug 12, 2020 at 4:15
92

I have an expression for checking email addresses that I use.

Since none of the above were as short or as accurate as mine, I thought I would post it here.

@"^[\w!#$%&'*+\-/=?\^_`{|}~]+(\.[\w!#$%&'*+\-/=?\^_`{|}~]+)*"
+ "@"
+ @"((([\-\w]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,4})|(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}))$";

For more info go read about it here: C# – Email Regular Expression

Also, this checks for RFC validity based on email syntax, not for whether the email really exists. The only way to test that an email really exists is to send an email and have the user verify they received the email by clicking a link or entering a token.

Then there are throw-away domains, such as Mailinator.com, and such. This doesn't do anything to verify whether an email is from a throwaway domain or not.

14
  • Thats the one I was looking for - thanx! Takes both double dots ".." and white spaces ". ". Commented Feb 28, 2012 at 17:43
  • 7
    I updated my regular expression project to have unit tests and I even fixed a couple of bugs: C# – Email Regular Expression rhyous.com/2010/06/15/csharp-email-regular-expression
    – Rhyous
    Commented Oct 16, 2012 at 21:00
  • 12
    Parth. Can you tell me what RFC rule is broken by your email? Because guess what. According to RFC, it is valid!!!! If you purchasesd the URL in.in, you could create this email address. Understand?
    – Rhyous
    Commented May 9, 2014 at 15:23
  • 2
    Actually, it looks like I already updated that on my github here: github.com/rhyous/EmailRegEx. However, \w may include underscores, so I may have to edit it for accuracy.
    – Rhyous
    Commented Oct 26, 2018 at 20:37
  • 1
    First, checking to see if an email is RFC valid is different from checking if it is a real email address. - If the email in the JSON doesn't pass the RFC, don't try to send email to it, it is for sure not real. And can you reject the JSON with an invalid email response? - If it passes the RFC, it's possibly a real emal. You are forced to accept the JSON, then try to send mail to it. Be careful, though. Sending bad emails in mass can affect your mailer daemon. It can get your IP blacklisted, or if using a mail tool like MailChimp, get your account limited.
    – Rhyous
    Commented May 1, 2019 at 19:58
49

I found nice document on MSDN for it.

How to: Verify that Strings Are in Valid Email Format http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/01escwtf.aspx (check out that this code also supports the use of non-ASCII characters for Internet domain names.)

There are 2 implementation, for .Net 2.0/3.0 and for .Net 3.5 and higher.
the 2.0/3.0 version is:

bool IsValidEmail(string strIn)
{
    // Return true if strIn is in valid e-mail format.
    return Regex.IsMatch(strIn, @"^([\w-\.]+)@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.)|(([\w-]+\.)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})(\]?)$"); 
}

My tests over this method give:

Invalid: @majjf.com
Invalid: A@b@[email protected]
Invalid: Abc.example.com
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Invalid: js*@proseware.com
Invalid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Invalid: ma@@jjf.com
Invalid: ma@jjf.
Invalid: [email protected]
Invalid: [email protected]
Invalid: ma_@jjf
Invalid: ma_@jjf.
Valid: [email protected]
Invalid: -------
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Invalid: [email protected]
Valid: j_9@[129.126.118.1]
Valid: [email protected]
Invalid: js#[email protected]
Invalid: [email protected]
Invalid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Invalid: [email protected]
Invalid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
Valid: [email protected]
6
  • 1
    Doesn't match [me]@whatever.museum
    – Toto
    Commented Dec 4, 2012 at 14:11
  • Invalid: Abc.example.com YES, that works correctly, however, this "[email protected]"; does not work Commented Jul 18, 2013 at 8:06
  • 2
    Had to add a plus sign: ` @"^([\w-\.+]+)@(([[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.)|(([\w-]+\.)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})(]?)$" ` 11 the char left on ] Google and hotmail aliassing allow for plus sign in first section before @ sign. Commented Aug 19, 2013 at 7:52
  • This is the same as above. allowing "[email protected]" as valid email address...!!
    – prem30488
    Commented May 9, 2014 at 9:51
  • 13
    @ParthTrivedi Why do you insist that [email protected] is not a valid email address?
    – stackh34p
    Commented Jul 17, 2015 at 9:45
22

The following code is based on Microsoft's Data annotations implementation on github and I think it's the most complete validation for emails:

public static Regex EmailValidation()
{
    const string pattern = @"^((([a-z]|\d|[!#\$%&'\*\+\-\/=\?\^_`{\|}~]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])+(\.([a-z]|\d|[!#\$%&'\*\+\-\/=\?\^_`{\|}~]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])+)*)|((\x22)((((\x20|\x09)*(\x0d\x0a))?(\x20|\x09)+)?(([\x01-\x08\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x1f\x7f]|\x21|[\x23-\x5b]|[\x5d-\x7e]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(\\([\x01-\x09\x0b\x0c\x0d-\x7f]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF]))))*(((\x20|\x09)*(\x0d\x0a))?(\x20|\x09)+)?(\x22)))@((([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])([a-z]|\d|-|\.|_|~|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])*([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])))\.)+(([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])([a-z]|\d|-|\.|_|~|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])*([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])))\.?$";
    const RegexOptions options = RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.ExplicitCapture;

    // Set explicit regex match timeout, sufficient enough for email parsing
    // Unless the global REGEX_DEFAULT_MATCH_TIMEOUT is already set
    TimeSpan matchTimeout = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2);

    try
    {
        if (AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetData("REGEX_DEFAULT_MATCH_TIMEOUT") == null)
        {
            return new Regex(pattern, options, matchTimeout);
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        // Fallback on error
    }

    // Legacy fallback (without explicit match timeout)
    return new Regex(pattern, options);
}
4
  • 1
    This should be the best regex because it seems to validate RFCs 5321 and 5322. It miss some unit testing.
    – ToXinE
    Commented Jul 20, 2018 at 16:17
  • 1
    Does not capture dot at the end of the email address.
    – Sellorio
    Commented Jan 20, 2019 at 0:13
  • Solution is elegant to adapt and the Regex covers wide range of valid / invalid evaluations, but it doesn't cover all the Email Address validation unit tests available here: codefool.tumblr.com/post/15288874550/…
    – cusman
    Commented Aug 31, 2020 at 14:38
  • Be warned that naively using this answer as-is will create a new Regex every time - you must store it in another static variable (like the referenced MS data annotations code does) or suffer a massive performance hit. eg private static Regex _emailRegex = EmailValidation();
    – notracs
    Commented Aug 23, 2023 at 5:12
17

As an update to the popular answer of Alex: In .NET 5 MailAddress now has a TryCreate. So you can do something like:

public static bool IsValidEmail(string email)
{
    if (!MailAddress.TryCreate(email, out var mailAddress))
        return false;

    // And if you want to be more strict:
    var hostParts = mailAddress.Host.Split('.');
    if (hostParts.Length == 1)
        return false; // No dot.
    if (hostParts.Any(p => p == string.Empty))
        return false; // Double dot.
    if (hostParts[^1].Length < 2)
        return false; // TLD only one letter.

    if (mailAddress.User.Contains(' '))
        return false;
    if (mailAddress.User.Split('.').Any(p => p == string.Empty))
        return false; // Double dot or dot at end of user part.

    return true;
}
16

This does not meet all of the requirements of RFCs 5321 and 5322, but it works with the following definitions.

@"^([0-9a-zA-Z]([\+\-_\.][0-9a-zA-Z]+)*)+"@(([0-9a-zA-Z][-\w]*[0-9a-zA-Z]*\.)+[a-zA-Z0-9]{2,17})$";

Below is the code

const String pattern =
   @"^([0-9a-zA-Z]" + //Start with a digit or alphabetical
   @"([\+\-_\.][0-9a-zA-Z]+)*" + // No continuous or ending +-_. chars in email
   @")+" +
   @"@(([0-9a-zA-Z][-\w]*[0-9a-zA-Z]*\.)+[a-zA-Z0-9]{2,17})$";

var validEmails = new[] {
        "[email protected]",
        "[email protected]",
        "[email protected]",
        "[email protected]",
        "[email protected]",
        "[email protected]",
        "[email protected]",
        "[email protected]",
        "[email protected]",
        "[email protected]",
        "[email protected]",
};
var invalidEmails = new[] {
        "Abc.example.com",     // No `@`
        "A@b@[email protected]",   // multiple `@`
        "[email protected]",      // continuous multiple dots in name
        "[email protected]",            // only 1 char in extension
        "[email protected]",         // continuous multiple dots in domain
        "ma@@jjf.com",         // continuous multiple `@`
        "@majjf.com",          // nothing before `@`
        "[email protected]",         // nothing after `.`
        "[email protected]",         // nothing after `_`
        "ma_@jjf",             // no domain extension 
        "ma_@jjf.",            // nothing after `_` and .
        "ma@jjf.",             // nothing after `.`
    };

foreach (var str in validEmails)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1} ", str, Regex.IsMatch(str, pattern));
}
foreach (var str in invalidEmails)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1} ", str, Regex.IsMatch(str, pattern));
}
2
  • 1
    this expression doesn't match valid addresses !#$%&'*+-/=?^_.{|}[email protected]` or this one Dörte@Sörensen.example.com
    – T.S.
    Commented Apr 26, 2019 at 20:23
  • This works!! Remove the white spaces once you copy and paste the regex. @"^([0-9a-zA-Z]([\+\-_\.][0-9a-zA-Z]+)*)+@(([0-9a-zA-Z][-\w] *[0-9a-zA-Z]*\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,})$"
    – Pavitha
    Commented May 24, 2023 at 0:51
12

Best email validation regex

[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?

And it's usage :-

bool isEmail = Regex.IsMatch(emailString, @"\A(?:[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?)\Z", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
0
9

Why not use EF6 attribute based e-mail validation?

As you can see above, Regex validation for e-mail always has some hole in it. If you are using EF6 data annotations, you can easily achieve reliable and stronger e-mail validation with EmailAddress data annotation attribute available for that. I had to remove the regex validation I used before for e-mail when I got mobile device specific regex failure on e-mail input field. When the data annotation attribute used for e-mail validation, the issue on mobile was resolved.

public class LoginViewModel
{
    [EmailAddress(ErrorMessage = "The email format is not valid")]
    public string Email{ get; set; }
1
  • I've been getting complaints about this one since it doesn't require a tld. Commented Aug 30, 2021 at 19:30
8
new System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.EmailAddressAttribute().IsValid(input)
2
  • The issue I have with C# default EmailAddress validations is that they accept abc@de as a valid email even though there's no TLD provided. Do you have any solution for that?
    – Reza Taba
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 17:04
  • @Reza Taba - I believe the answer to your question is found here: stackoverflow.com/questions/20573488/… Commented Apr 30, 2023 at 4:44
7

Try this on for size:

public static bool IsValidEmailAddress(this string s)
{
    var regex = new Regex(@"[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?");
    return regex.IsMatch(s);
}
6

This regex works perfectly:

bool IsValidEmail(string email)
{
    return Regex.IsMatch(email, @"^[\w!#$%&'*+\-/=?\^_`{|}~]+(\.[\w!#$%&'*+\-/=?\^_`{|}~]+)*@((([\-\w]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,4})|(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}))\z");
}
2
  • [email protected] fails for instance. Commented Jul 29, 2020 at 9:37
  • Yes it fails, because this emal address can be valid also. Nowdays you can use many different domian types, like in your case ".istanbul". I use this solution. Commented Oct 19, 2020 at 7:51
5

This one prevents invalid emails mentioned by others in the comments:

[email protected]
[email protected]
name@hotmail
[email protected]
[email protected]

It also prevents emails with double dots:

[email protected]

Try testing it with as many invalid email addresses as you can find.

using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

public static bool IsValidEmail(string email)
{
    return Regex.IsMatch(email, @"\A[a-z0-9]+([-._][a-z0-9]+)*@([a-z0-9]+(-[a-z0-9]+)*\.)+[a-z]{2,4}\z")
        && Regex.IsMatch(email, @"^(?=.{1,64}@.{4,64}$)(?=.{6,100}$).*");
}

See validate email address using regular expression in C#.

1
  • This returns false for all of my invalid email addresses. Unfortunately, also returns false for many valid email addresses.
    – Mark
    Commented Jul 13, 2018 at 13:41
5

Try this, it's working for me:

public bool IsValidEmailAddress(string s)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
        return false;
    else
    {
        var regex = new Regex(@"\w+([-+.']\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*");
        return regex.IsMatch(s) && !s.EndsWith(".");
    }
}
5

Email validation using regex

    string pattern = @"\A(?:[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?)\Z";

    //check first string
   if (Regex.IsMatch(EmailId1 , pattern))
   {    
       //if email is valid
        Console.WriteLine(EmailId1+ " is a valid Email address ");
   }

Source: email validation c#

Validation Without Regex using MailAddress.MailAddress(String) class constructor

public bool IsEmailValid(string emailaddress)
{
 try
 {
    MailAddress m = new MailAddress(emailaddress);
    return true;
 }
 catch (FormatException)
 {
    return false;
 }
}
1
4

To validate your email ID, you can simply create such method and use it.

    public static bool IsValidEmail(string email)
    {
        var r = new Regex(@"^([0-9a-zA-Z]([-\.\w]*[0-9a-zA-Z])*@([0-9a-zA-Z][-\w]*[0-9a-zA-Z]\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,9})$");
        return !String.IsNullOrEmpty(email) && r.IsMatch(email);
    }

This will return True / False. (Valid / Invalid Email Id)

0
2

It has taken many attempts to create an email validator which catches nearly all worldwide requirements for email.

Extension method you can call with:

myEmailString.IsValidEmailAddress();

Regex pattern string you can get by calling:

var myPattern = Regex.EmailPattern;

The Code (mostly comments):

    /// <summary>
    /// Validates the string is an Email Address...
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="emailAddress"></param>
    /// <returns>bool</returns>
    public static bool IsValidEmailAddress(this string emailAddress)
    {
        var valid = true;
        var isnotblank = false;

        var email = emailAddress.Trim();
        if (email.Length > 0)
        {
            // Email Address Cannot start with period.
            // Name portion must be at least one character
            // In the Name, valid characters are:  a-z 0-9 ! # _ % & ' " = ` { } ~ - + * ? ^ | / $
            // Cannot have period immediately before @ sign.
            // Cannot have two @ symbols
            // In the domain, valid characters are: a-z 0-9 - .
            // Domain cannot start with a period or dash
            // Domain name must be 2 characters.. not more than 256 characters
            // Domain cannot end with a period or dash.
            // Domain must contain a period
            isnotblank = true;
            valid = Regex.IsMatch(email, Regex.EmailPattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase) &&
                !email.StartsWith("-") &&
                !email.StartsWith(".") &&
                !email.EndsWith(".") && 
                !email.Contains("..") &&
                !email.Contains(".@") &&
                !email.Contains("@.");
        }

        return (valid && isnotblank);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Validates the string is an Email Address or a delimited string of email addresses...
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="emailAddress"></param>
    /// <returns>bool</returns>
    public static bool IsValidEmailAddressDelimitedList(this string emailAddress, char delimiter = ';')
    {
        var valid = true;
        var isnotblank = false;

        string[] emails = emailAddress.Split(delimiter);

        foreach (string e in emails)
        {
            var email = e.Trim();
            if (email.Length > 0 && valid) // if valid == false, no reason to continue checking
            {
                isnotblank = true;
                if (!email.IsValidEmailAddress())
                {
                    valid = false;
                }
            }
        }
        return (valid && isnotblank);
    }

    public class Regex
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Set of Unicode Characters currently supported in the application for email, etc.
        /// </summary>
        public static readonly string UnicodeCharacters = "À-ÿ\p{L}\p{M}ÀàÂâÆæÇçÈèÉéÊêËëÎîÏïÔôŒœÙùÛûÜü«»€₣äÄöÖüÜß"; // German and French

        /// <summary>
        /// Set of Symbol Characters currently supported in the application for email, etc.
        /// Needed if a client side validator is being used.
        /// Not needed if validation is done server side.
        /// The difference is due to subtle differences in Regex engines.
        /// </summary>
        public static readonly string SymbolCharacters = @"!#%&'""=`{}~\.\-\+\*\?\^\|\/\$";

        /// <summary>
        /// Regular Expression string pattern used to match an email address.
        /// The following characters will be supported anywhere in the email address:
        /// ÀàÂâÆæÇçÈèÉéÊêËëÎîÏïÔôŒœÙùÛûÜü«»€₣äÄöÖüÜß[a - z][A - Z][0 - 9] _
        /// The following symbols will be supported in the first part of the email address(before the @ symbol):
        /// !#%&'"=`{}~.-+*?^|\/$
        /// Emails cannot start or end with periods,dashes or @.
        /// Emails cannot have two @ symbols.
        /// Emails must have an @ symbol followed later by a period.
        /// Emails cannot have a period before or after the @ symbol.
        /// </summary>
        public static readonly string EmailPattern = String.Format(
            @"^([\w{0}{2}])+@{1}[\w{0}]+([-.][\w{0}]+)*\.[\w{0}]+([-.][\w{0}]+)*$",                     //  @"^[{0}\w]+([-+.'][{0}\w]+)*@[{0}\w]+([-.][{0}\w]+)*\.[{0}\w]+([-.][{0}\w]+)*$",
            UnicodeCharacters,
            "{1}",
            SymbolCharacters
        );
    }
0
1
public static bool ValidateEmail(string str)
{                       
     return Regex.IsMatch(str, @"\w+([-+.']\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*");
}

I use the above code to validate the email address.

1
   public bool VailidateEntriesForAccount()
    {
       if (!(txtMailId.Text.Trim() == string.Empty))
        {
            if (!IsEmail(txtMailId.Text))
            {
                Logger.Debug("Entered invalid Email ID's");
                MessageBox.Show("Please enter valid Email Id's" );
                txtMailId.Focus();
                return false;
            }
        }
     }
   private bool IsEmail(string strEmail)
    {
        Regex validateEmail = new Regex("^[\\W]*([\\w+\\-.%]+@[\\w\\-.]+\\.[A-Za-z] {2,4}[\\W]*,{1}[\\W]*)*([\\w+\\-.%]+@[\\w\\-.]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,4})[\\W]*$");
        return validateEmail.IsMatch(strEmail);
    }
1
  • While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value
    – AStopher
    Commented Aug 2, 2018 at 10:49
1

This is my favorite approach to this so far:

public static class CommonExtensions
{
    public static bool IsValidEmail(this string thisEmail)
        => !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(thisEmail) &&
           new Regex(@"^([\w\.\-]+)@([\w\-]+)((\.(\w){2,3})+)$").IsMatch(thisEmail);
}

Then use the created string extension like:

if (!emailAsString.IsValidEmail()) throw new Exception("Invalid Email");
1

There's no perfect regular expression, but this one is pretty strong, I think, based on study of RFC5322. And with C# string interpolation, pretty easy to follow, I think, as well.

const string atext = @"a-zA-Z\d!#\$%&'\*\+-/=\?\^_`\{\|\}~";
var localPart = $"[{atext}]+(\\.[{atext}]+)*";
var domain = $"[{atext}]+(\\.[{atext}]+)*";
Assert.That(() => EmailRegex = new Regex($"^{localPart}@{domain}$", Compiled), 
Throws.Nothing);

Vetted with NUnit 2.x.

1

Just let me know IF it doesn't work :)

public static bool isValidEmail(this string email)
{

    string[] mail = email.Split(new string[] { "@" }, StringSplitOptions.None);

    if (mail.Length != 2)
        return false;

    //check part before ...@

    if (mail[0].Length < 1)
        return false;

    System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex regex = new System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(@"^[a-zA-Z0-9_\-\.]+$");
    if (!regex.IsMatch(mail[0]))
        return false;

    //check part after @...

    string[] domain = mail[1].Split(new string[] { "." }, StringSplitOptions.None);

    if (domain.Length < 2)
        return false;

    regex = new System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(@"^[a-zA-Z0-9_\-]+$");

    foreach (string d in domain)
    {
        if (!regex.IsMatch(d))
            return false;
    }

    //get TLD
    if (domain[domain.Length - 1].Length < 2)
        return false;

    return true;

}
1

I've created a FormValidationUtils class to validate email:

public static class FormValidationUtils
{
    const string ValidEmailAddressPattern = "^[A-Z0-9._%+-]+@[A-Z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Z]{2,6}$";

    public static bool IsEmailValid(string email)
    {
        var regex = new Regex(ValidEmailAddressPattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
        return regex.IsMatch(email);
    }
}
0

Try the Following Code:

using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
if  (!Regex.IsMatch(txtEmail.Text, @"^[a-z,A-Z]{1,10}((-|.)\w+)*@\w+.\w{3}$"))
        MessageBox.Show("Not valid email.");
0

STRING SEARCH USING REGEX METHOD IN C#

How to validate an Email by Regular Expression?

string EmailPattern = @"\w+([-+.']\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*";
if (Regex.IsMatch(Email, EmailPattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase))
{
    Console.WriteLine("Email: {0} is valid.", Email);
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("Email: {0} is not valid.", Email);
}

Use Reference String.Regex() Method

1
  • This works the best for me, allowing '+' and unicode characters Commented Aug 26, 2021 at 13:59
0
string patternEmail = @"(?<email>\w+@\w+\.[a-z]{0,3})";
Regex regexEmail = new Regex(patternEmail);
0
0

1

^[\w!#$%&'*+\-/=?\^_`{|}~]+(\.[\w!#$%&'*+\-/=?\^_`{|}~]+)*@((([\-\w]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,4})|(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}))$

2

^(([^<>()[\]\\.,;:\s@\""]+(\.[^<>()[\]\\.,;:\s@\""]+)*)|(\"".+\""))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$
0

I think your caret and dollar sign are part of the problem You should also modify the regex a little, I use the next @"[ :]+([\w.-]+)@([\w-.])+((.(\w){2,3})+)"

1
  • When you use the result Trim(':')
    – ABMoharram
    Commented Jun 14, 2017 at 1:11
0

Regex Email Pattern:

^(?:[\\w\\!\\#\\$\\%\\&\\'\\*\\+\\-\\/\\=\\?\\^\\`\\{\\|\\}\\~]+\\.)*[\\w\\!\\#\\$\\%\\&\\'\\*\\+\\-\\/\\=\\?\\^\\`\\{\\|\\}\\~]+@(?:(?:(?:[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9\\-](?!\\.)){0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9]?\\.)+[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9\\-](?!$)){0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9]?)|(?:\\[(?:(?:[01]?\\d{1,2}|2[0-4]\\d|25[0-5])\\.){3}(?:[01]?\\d{1,2}|2[0-4]\\d|25[0-5])\\]))$
0
0

I've been using the Regex.IsMatch().

First of all you need to add the next statement:

using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

Then the method looks like:

private bool EmailValidation(string pEmail)
{
                 return Regex.IsMatch(pEmail,
                 @"^(?("")("".+?(?<!\\)""@)|(([0-9a-z]((\.(?!\.))|[-!#\$%&'\*\+/=\?\^`\{\}\|~\w])*)(?<=[0-9a-z])@))" +
                 @"(?(\[)(\[(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}\])|(([0-9a-z][-\w]*[0-9a-z]*\.)+[a-z0-9][\-a-z0-9]{0,22}[a-z0-9]))$",
                 RegexOptions.IgnoreCase, TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(250));
}

It's a private method because of my logic but you can put the method as static in another Layer such as "Utilities" and call it from where you need.

1
  • You need to catch the timeout error as well.
    – Reza Taba
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 17:18

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