3

I'm trying to find a way to drag and drop polygon point or line with javascript in html5 canvas by selecting a path points with mouse click on it

Kind like image below enter image description here

the selected points are moved by clicking and dragging them into new position

var canvas=document.getElementById("canvas");
var context=canvas.getContext("2d");
var cw=canvas.width;
var ch=canvas.height;
function reOffset(){
  var BB=canvas.getBoundingClientRect();
  offsetX=BB.left;
  offsetY=BB.top;        
}
var offsetX,offsetY;
reOffset();
window.onscroll=function(e){ reOffset(); }

context.lineWidth=2;
context.strokeStyle='blue';

var coordinates = [];
var isDone=false;

$('#done').click(function(){
  isDone=true;
});

$("#canvas").mousedown(function(e){handleMouseDown(e);});

function handleMouseDown(e){
  if(isDone || coordinates.length>10){return;}

  // tell the browser we're handling this event
  e.preventDefault();
  e.stopPropagation();

  mouseX=parseInt(e.clientX-offsetX);
  mouseY=parseInt(e.clientY-offsetY);
  coordinates.push({x:mouseX,y:mouseY});
  drawPolygon();
}

function drawPolygon(){
  context.clearRect(0,0,cw,ch);
  context.beginPath();
  context.moveTo(coordinates[0].x, coordinates[0].y);
  for(index=1; index<coordinates.length;index++) {
    context.lineTo(coordinates[index].x, coordinates[index].y);
  }
  context.closePath();
  context.stroke();
}
body{ background-color: ivory; }
#canvas{border:1px solid red;}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<h4>Click to assign polygon vertices</h4>
<button id=done>Click when done assigning points</button>
<br><canvas id="canvas" width=300 height=300></canvas>

2
  • So, what is your question exactly? Are you asking us to write code that will allow for path editing drag and drop? Nov 22 '18 at 10:06
  • The question is in the first line : how to drag and drop polygon point. The problem of a drag and drop for polygon point is the position change of the two line that made that point. I'm asking for any help to figured out how to this : explanation, code, link anything Nov 22 '18 at 10:22
6

The answer given is an example of bad practice in regard to handling the mouse and rendering content.

Rendering from mouse events will chew power and force canvas renders when not needed. The mouse can fire at rates up to 1000 times a second while the max display rate is only 60 times a second.

Using mouse move events means that many of the rendered updates will not be seen by the user, and are just wasted CPU/GPU cycles at best, at worst a major battery drain.

Always use requestAnimationFrame to render any content that is frequently changing.

The example below decoples the rendering from input events using requestAnimationFrame to render content only when needed. It also adds some feedback for the user via the cursor and highlighting points.

var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
requestAnimationFrame(update)

mouse = {x : 0, y : 0, button : 0, lx : 0, ly : 0, update : true};
function mouseEvents(e){
	const bounds = canvas.getBoundingClientRect();
	mouse.x = e.pageX - bounds.left - scrollX;
	mouse.y = e.pageY - bounds.top - scrollY;
	mouse.button = e.type === "mousedown" ? true : e.type === "mouseup" ? false : mouse.button;
  mouse.update = true;
}
["mousedown","mouseup","mousemove"].forEach(name => document.addEventListener(name,mouseEvents));



ctx.lineWidth = 2;
ctx.strokeStyle = "blue";
const point = (x,y) => ({x,y});
const poly = () => ({
    points : [],
    addPoint(p){ this.points.push(point(p.x,p.y)) },
    draw() {
        ctx.lineWidth = 2;
        ctx.strokeStyle = "blue";
        ctx.beginPath();
        for (const p of this.points) { ctx.lineTo(p.x,p.y) }
        ctx.closePath();
        for (const p of this.points) {
            ctx.moveTo(p.x + 4,p.y);
            ctx.arc(p.x,p.y,4,0,Math.PI *2);
        }
        ctx.stroke();
    },
    closest(pos, dist = 8) {
        var i = 0, index = -1;
        dist *= dist;
        for (const p of this.points) {
            var x = pos.x - p.x;
            var y = pos.y - p.y;
            var d2 =  x * x + y * y;
            if (d2 < dist) {
                dist = d2;
                index = i;
            }
            i++;
        }
        if (index > -1) { return this.points[index] }
    }
});
function drawCircle(pos,color="red",size=8){
    ctx.strokeStyle = color;
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(pos.x,pos.y,size,0,Math.PI *2);
    ctx.stroke();
}
const polygon = poly();
var activePoint,cursor;
var dragging= false;
function update(){
    if (mouse.update) {
        cursor = "crosshair";
        ctx.clearRect(0,0,canvas.width,canvas.height);
        if (!dragging) {  activePoint = polygon.closest(mouse) }
        if (activePoint === undefined && mouse.button) {
            polygon.addPoint(mouse);
            mouse.button = false;
        } else if(activePoint) {
            if (mouse.button) {
                if(dragging) {
                    activePoint.x += mouse.x - mouse.lx;
                    activePoint.y += mouse.y - mouse.ly;
                } else {  dragging = true }
            } else { dragging = false }
        }
        polygon.draw();
        if (activePoint) { 
            drawCircle(activePoint);
            cursor = "move";
        }

        mouse.lx = mouse.x;
        mouse.ly = mouse.y;
        canvas.style.cursor = cursor;
        mouse.update = false;
    }
    requestAnimationFrame(update)
}
#canvas{
  border:1px 
  solid black;
}
<canvas id="canvas" width=300 height=300></canvas>

0
3

I've made a few changes to your code. Since I need to detect the position of the mouse I've added a function to do this.

The logic is as it follows:

  1. you draw the points.

  2. When you are done you can begin to drag the points

  3. If you click inside a point (a small circle around the point) you save the index of the point.

  4. on mouse move you move the point you clicked in.

  5. on mouse up no point is dragged anymore.

I hope this is what you need.

var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
var context = canvas.getContext("2d");
var cw = canvas.width;
var ch = canvas.height;
var mouse = {};
var draggable = false;

context.lineWidth = 2;
context.strokeStyle = "blue";

var coordinates = [];
var isDone = false;

done.addEventListener("click", function() {
  isDone = true;
});

canvas.addEventListener("mousedown", function(e) {
  handleMouseDown(e);
});

function handleMouseDown(e) {
  mouse = oMousePos(canvas, e);
  //if isDone you can drag
  if (isDone || coordinates.length > 10) {
    for (index = 0; index < coordinates.length; index++) {
    // you draw a small circle no stroke, no fill
      context.beginPath();
      context.arc(
        coordinates[index].x,
        coordinates[index].y,
        5,
        0,
        2 * Math.PI
      );
      // if the mouse is inside the circle
      if (context.isPointInPath(mouse.x, mouse.y)) {
      // you can drag this point
      // I'm using index + 1 because index == 0 is false
        draggable = index + 1; 
      // if I have a point a can break the loop 
        break;
      }
    }
  } else {
    coordinates.push({ x: mouse.x, y: mouse.y });
    drawPolygon();
  }
}

function drawPolygon() {
  context.clearRect(0, 0, cw, ch);
  context.beginPath();
  context.moveTo(coordinates[0].x, coordinates[0].y);
  for (index = 1; index < coordinates.length; index++) {
    context.lineTo(coordinates[index].x, coordinates[index].y);
  }
  context.closePath();
  context.stroke();
  // Additionaly I'm drawing a small circle around every point
  // you can delete this.
  for (index = 0; index < coordinates.length; index++) {
    context.beginPath();
    context.arc(coordinates[index].x, coordinates[index].y, 5, 0, 2 * Math.PI);
    context.stroke();
  }
}

canvas.addEventListener("mousemove", function(e) {
  if (isDone) {
    if (draggable) {
      mouse = oMousePos(canvas, e);
      // draggable - 1 is the index of the point in the coordinates array
      coordinates[draggable - 1].x = mouse.x;
      coordinates[draggable - 1].y = mouse.y;
      drawPolygon();
    }
  }
});

canvas.addEventListener("mouseup", function(e) {
  if (draggable) {
    draggable = false;
  }
});


// a function to detect the mouse position

function oMousePos(canvas, evt) {
  var ClientRect = canvas.getBoundingClientRect();
  return {
    //objeto
    x: Math.round(evt.clientX - ClientRect.left),
    y: Math.round(evt.clientY - ClientRect.top)
  };
}
body{ background-color: ivory; }
#canvas{border:1px solid red;}
<h4>Click to assign polygon vertices</h4>
<button id=done>Click when done assigning points</button>
<br><canvas id="canvas" width=300 height=300></canvas>

2
  • Thanks for your answer I just wonder why you do coordinates.length > 10 for handleMouseDown function ? Nov 22 '18 at 15:10
  • coordinates.length > 10 was in your code. I supposed you wanted to limit the number of your points.
    – enxaneta
    Nov 22 '18 at 18:18

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