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I am receiving this error from Quartus when trying to compile:

Error (10200): Verilog HDL Conditional Statement error at time_of_day_FSM.v(166): cannot match operand(s) in the condition to the corresponding edges in the enclosing event control of the always construct

Here is some background. I am making a clock, and for this always block, I want to increment and set certain values to resemble the behavior of a clock in the format of hh:mm:ss. I have a clock source that goes high every millisecond, and am using a counter to set the secondPassed reg.

I want the code in the block to update every time a second passes, like a clock, or KEY[2] is pressed on my board (down = 0), as this is what the user uses to increment the hours, minutes, or seconds when setting the clock time. Here is the always block in question (sorry for the nested if statements, I can't think of a better way to do it):

// every second. Used just to keep time going. Independent of states.
always @(posedge secondPassed, negedge KEY[2], negedge KEY[0]) begin
    if(KEY[0] == 0) begin
        hr1 <= 1;
        hr0 <= 2;
        min1 <= 0;
        min0 <= 0;
        sec1 <= 0;
        sec0 <= 0;
    end 
    else if(secondPassed == 1 || KEY[2] == 0) begin // I don't care about explicitly stating the conditions, as the sensitivity list covers that right?
        if(sec0 == 9) begin
            sec0 <= 0;
            if(sec1 == 5) begin
                sec1 <= 0;
                if(min0 == 9) begin
                    min0 <= 0;
                    if(min1 == 5) begin
                        min1 <= 0;

                        if(hr1 == 1) begin
                                if(hr0 == 2) begin 
                                    hr0 <= 1; // go to 1 o'clock
                                    hr1 <= 0;
                                end
                                else hr0 <= hr0 + 1;
                        end
                        else hr0 <= hr0 + 1;
                    end
                    else min1 <= min1 + 1;
                end
                else min0 <= min0 + 1;
            end
            else sec1 <= sec1 + 1;
        end
        else begin 
            sec0 <= sec0 + 1;
        end
        just_flashed <= ~just_flashed;
    end // end big else 
end // end always

My question is: Why does the Quartus compiler complain if I try to make the non-reset scenario JUST AND ELSE, like this:

 // every second. Used just to keep time going. Independent of states.
 always @(posedge secondPassed, negedge KEY[2], negedge KEY[0]) begin
if(KEY[0] == 0) begin
    hr1 <= 1;
    hr0 <= 2;
    min1 <= 0;
    min0 <= 0;
    sec1 <= 0;
    sec0 <= 0;
end 
else begin // this is causing the issue. compiler complains .
    // same logic to drive clock as above
    just_flashed <= ~just_flashed;
end // end big else 
end // end always

I feel I have seen many examples where people simply use and else begin end for their code. My code seems to want my to EXPLICITLY restate the conditions of the sensitivity list for the else if. Any explanation? I am new to large verilog projects.

  • 1
    I guess it tries to identify the clock, which is a non-used 'edge' element. You have 2 unused and it gets confused. Try to remove KEY[2] from the sensitivity list. – Serge Nov 22 '18 at 19:47
3

You are mixing combinational logic and synchronous logic in the always block and this is bad habit of coding. Generally, there are 2 main always blocks in most designs.

A combinational:

always@(*) // * adds anything under this always block to sensitivity list.
begin      // Which makes this always block combinational.
    count_reg_d <= somelogic;
end

Then these combinational logic is assigned to proper registers in the sequental always block:

always@(posedge clk, negedge rst)
begin
    if(~rst)
        count_reg_q <= 0;
    else
    begin
        count_reg_q <= count_reg_d;
    end
end

By coding this way you avoid mixed always blocks, and the code is much more readable and closer to hardware that is being synthesized. So if you update the always blocks' sensitivity list properly the problems has to be solved.

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