246

Let's say I have 3 inputs: rate, sendAmount, and receiveAmount. I put that 3 inputs on useEffect diffing params. The rules are:

  • If sendAmount changed, I calculate receiveAmount = sendAmount * rate
  • If receiveAmount changed, I calculate sendAmount = receiveAmount / rate
  • If rate changed, I calculate receiveAmount = sendAmount * rate when sendAmount > 0 or I calculate sendAmount = receiveAmount / rate when receiveAmount > 0

Here is the codesandbox https://codesandbox.io/s/pkl6vn7x6j to demonstrate the problem.

Is there a way to compare the oldValues and newValues like on componentDidUpdate instead of making 3 handlers for this case?

Thanks


Here is my final solution with usePrevious https://codesandbox.io/s/30n01w2r06

In this case, I cannot use multiple useEffect because each change is leading to the same network call. That's why I also use changeCount to track the change too. This changeCount also helpful to track changes from local only, so I can prevent unnecessary network call because of changes from the server.

2
  • How exactly is componentDidUpdate supposed to help? You will still need to write these 3 conditions. – Estus Flask Nov 23 '18 at 12:05
  • I added an answer with 2 optional solutions. Does one of them work for you? – Ben Carp Jun 29 '19 at 12:45

13 Answers 13

342

You can write a custom hook to provide you a previous props using useRef

function usePrevious(value) {
  const ref = useRef();
  useEffect(() => {
    ref.current = value;
  });
  return ref.current;
}

and then use it in useEffect

const Component = (props) => {
    const {receiveAmount, sendAmount } = props
    const prevAmount = usePrevious({receiveAmount, sendAmount});
    useEffect(() => {
        if(prevAmount.receiveAmount !== receiveAmount) {

         // process here
        }
        if(prevAmount.sendAmount !== sendAmount) {

         // process here
        }
    }, [receiveAmount, sendAmount])
}

However its clearer and probably better and clearer to read and understand if you use two useEffect separately for each change id you want to process them separately

12
  • 10
    Thanks for the note on using two useEffect calls separately. Wasn't aware you could use it multiple times! – JasonH Jan 22 '19 at 15:24
  • 4
    I tried the code above, but eslint is warning me that useEffect missing dependencies prevAmount – Littlee May 20 '19 at 9:53
  • 3
    Since prevAmount holds value for the previous value of state/props, you don't need to pass it as a dependecy to useEffect and you can disable this warning for the particular case. You can read this post for more details ? – Shubham Khatri May 20 '19 at 10:10
  • 1
    Love this – useRef always comes to the rescue. – Fernando Rojo Jul 16 '19 at 16:29
  • 8
    In usePrevious, shouldn't the useEffect have a dependency on value? Otherwise if the component is re-rendered due to a different state change, in the next render, previousValue will equal value, right? Or am I missing something? – azizj Mar 19 '20 at 21:31
87

Incase anybody is looking for a TypeScript version of usePrevious:

In a .tsx module:

import { useEffect, useRef } from "react";

const usePrevious = <T extends unknown>(value: T): T | undefined => {
  const ref = useRef<T>();
  useEffect(() => {
    ref.current = value;
  });
  return ref.current;
};

Or in a .ts module:

import { useEffect, useRef } from "react";

const usePrevious = <T>(value: T): T | undefined => {
  const ref = useRef<T>();
  useEffect(() => {
    ref.current = value;
  });
  return ref.current;
};
11
  • 3
    Note that this will not work in a TSX file, to get this to work in a TSX file change to const usePrevious = <T extends any>(... to make the interpreter see think that <T> is not JSX and is a generic restriction – apokryfos Oct 23 '19 at 12:23
  • 2
    Can you explain why <T extends {}> will not work. It seems to be working for me but I am trying to understand the complexity of using it like that. – Karthikeyan_kk Dec 12 '19 at 9:58
  • 1
    It's better to extend unknown, or to simply put the hook in a .ts file. If you extend {} you will get errors if you skip specifying T in usePrevious<T>. – fgblomqvist Aug 19 '20 at 17:52
  • 1
    np, and yeah, always nice to keep it fresh/correct/up-to-date since many thousand people use these answers as references :) – fgblomqvist Aug 19 '20 at 18:26
  • 2
    @fgblomqvist Updated my answer. Thanks for the feedback again. – SeedyROM Aug 19 '20 at 22:50
52

Option 1 - run useEffect when value changes

const Component = (props) => {

  useEffect(() => {
    console.log("val1 has changed");
  }, [val1]);

  return <div>...</div>;
};

Demo

Option 2 - useHasChanged hook

Comparing a current value to a previous value is a common pattern, and justifies a custom hook of it's own that hides implementation details.

const Component = (props) => {
  const hasVal1Changed = useHasChanged(val1)

  useEffect(() => {
    if (hasVal1Changed ) {
      console.log("val1 has changed");
    }
  });

  return <div>...</div>;
};

const useHasChanged= (val: any) => {
    const prevVal = usePrevious(val)
    return prevVal !== val
}

const usePrevious = (value) => {
    const ref = useRef();
    useEffect(() => {
      ref.current = value;
    });
    return ref.current;
}


Demo

4
  • Second option worked for me. Can you please guide me why I have to write useEffect Twice? – Tarun Nagpal Mar 27 '20 at 16:51
  • @TarunNagpal, you don't necessarily need to use useEffect twice. It depends on your use case. Imagine that we just want to log which val has changed. If we have both val1 and val2 in our array of dependencies, it will run each time any of the values has changed. Then inside the function we pass we'll have to figure out which val has changed to log the correct message. – Ben Carp Mar 28 '20 at 16:39
  • Thanks for the reply. When you say "inside the function we pass we'll have to figure out which val has change". How we can achieve it. Please guide – Tarun Nagpal Mar 29 '20 at 17:54
  • Thanks, Option 2 - is exactly what I need – bFunc Feb 7 at 20:13
18

Going off the accepted answer, an alternative solution that doesn't require a custom hook:

const Component = ({ receiveAmount, sendAmount }) => {
  const prevAmount = useRef({ receiveAmount, sendAmount }).current;
  useEffect(() => {
    if (prevAmount.receiveAmount !== receiveAmount) {
     // process here
    }
    if (prevAmount.sendAmount !== sendAmount) {
     // process here
    }
    return () => { 
      prevAmount.receiveAmount = receiveAmount;
      prevAmount.sendAmount = sendAmount;
    };
  }, [receiveAmount, sendAmount]);
};

This assumes you actually need reference to the previous values for anything in the "process here" bits. Otherwise unless your conditionals are beyond a straight !== comparison, the simplest solution here would just be:

const Component = ({ receiveAmount, sendAmount }) => {
  useEffect(() => {
     // process here
  }, [receiveAmount]);

  useEffect(() => {
     // process here
  }, [sendAmount]);
};
5
  • 1
    Good solution, but contains syntax errors. useRef not userRef. Forgot to use current prevAmount.current – Blake Plumb Apr 28 '20 at 14:07
  • 2
    This is super cool, if I could upvote more I would! Makes total sense as well, my original answer came from a place of ignorance. I think this is probably the simplest and most elegant pattern I've seen so far. – SeedyROM Oct 13 '20 at 8:04
  • 1
    You could probably abstract this even further to make a super simple utility. – SeedyROM Oct 13 '20 at 8:05
  • This will give you the initial values rather than the previous values. The reason the usePrevious() hook works is because it's wrapped in useEffect() – Justin Jun 23 at 20:20
  • @Justin The return function should update the previous values ref every render. Have you tested it? – Drazen Bjelovuk Jun 24 at 3:19
7

I just published react-delta which solves this exact sort of scenario. In my opinion, useEffect has too many responsibilities.

Responsibilities

  1. It compares all values in its dependency array using Object.is
  2. It runs effect/cleanup callbacks based on the result of #1

Breaking Up Responsibilities

react-delta breaks useEffect's responsibilities into several smaller hooks.

Responsibility #1

Responsibility #2

In my experience, this approach is more flexible, clean, and concise than useEffect/useRef solutions.

2
  • Just what I'm looking for. Gonna try it out! – hackerl33t Apr 24 '20 at 10:34
  • @Hisato it very well might be overkill. It's something of an experimental API. And frankly I haven't used it much within my teams because it's not widely known or adopted. In theory it sounds kind of nice, but in practice it might not be worth it. – Austin Malerba Jul 10 '20 at 15:41
5

If you prefer a useEffect replacement approach:

const usePreviousEffect = (fn, inputs = []) => {
  const previousInputsRef = useRef([...inputs])

  useEffect(() => {
    fn(previousInputsRef.current)
    previousInputsRef.current = [...inputs]
  }, inputs)
}

And use it like this:

usePreviousEffect(
  ([prevReceiveAmount, prevSendAmount]) => {
    if (prevReceiveAmount !== receiveAmount) // side effect here
    if (prevSendAmount !== sendAmount) // side effect here
  },
  [receiveAmount, sendAmount]
)

Note that the first time the effect executes, the previous values passed to your fn will be the same as your initial input values. This would only matter to you if you wanted to do something when a value did not change.

4

For really simple prop comparison you can use useEffect to easily check to see if a prop has updated.

const myComponent = ({ prop }) => {
  useEffect(() => {
    ---Do stuffhere----
  }, [prop])
}

useEffect will then only run your code if the prop changes.

6
  • 1
    This only works once, after consecutive prop changes you will not be able to ~ do stuff here ~ – Karolis Šarapnickis Oct 10 '19 at 7:34
  • 2
    Seems like you should call setHasPropChanged(false) at the end of ~ do stuff here ~ to "reset" your state. (But this would reset in an extra rerender) – Kevin Wang Oct 16 '19 at 18:21
  • Thanks for the feedback, you are both right, updated solution – Charlie Tupman Jun 2 '20 at 14:44
  • @AntonioPavicevac-Ortiz I've updated the answer to now render the propHasChanged as true which would then call it once on render, might be a better solution just to rip out the useEffect and just check the prop – Charlie Tupman Jun 11 '20 at 16:17
  • I think my original use of this has been lost. Looking back at the code you can just use useEffect – Charlie Tupman Jun 11 '20 at 16:20
3

Since state isn't tightly coupled with component instance in functional components, previous state cannot be reached in useEffect without saving it first, for instance, with useRef. This also means that state update was possibly incorrectly implemented in wrong place because previous state is available inside setState updater function.

This is a good use case for useReducer which provides Redux-like store and allows to implement respective pattern. State updates are performed explicitly, so there's no need to figure out which state property is updated; this is already clear from dispatched action.

Here's an example what it may look like:

function reducer({ sendAmount, receiveAmount, rate }, action) {
  switch (action.type) {
    case "sendAmount":
      sendAmount = action.payload;
      return {
        sendAmount,
        receiveAmount: sendAmount * rate,
        rate
      };
    case "receiveAmount":
      receiveAmount = action.payload;
      return {
        sendAmount: receiveAmount / rate,
        receiveAmount,
        rate
      };
    case "rate":
      rate = action.payload;
      return {
        sendAmount: receiveAmount ? receiveAmount / rate : sendAmount,
        receiveAmount: sendAmount ? sendAmount * rate : receiveAmount,
        rate
      };
    default:
      throw new Error();
  }
}

function handleChange(e) {
  const { name, value } = e.target;
  dispatch({
    type: name,
    payload: value
  });
}

...
const [state, dispatch] = useReducer(reducer, {
  rate: 2,
  sendAmount: 0,
  receiveAmount: 0
});
...
6
  • Hi @estus, thanks for this idea. It gives me another way of thinking. But, I forgot to mention that I need to call API for each of the case. Do you have any solution for that? – rwinzhang Nov 23 '18 at 13:05
  • What do you mean? Inside handleChange? Does 'API' mean remote API endpoint? Can you update codesandbox from the answer with details? – Estus Flask Nov 23 '18 at 13:13
  • From the update I can assume that you want to fetch sendAmount, etc asynchronously instead of calculating them, right? This changes a lot. It's possible to do this with useReduce but may be tricky. If you dealt with Redux before you may know that async operations aren't straightforward there. github.com/reduxjs/redux-thunk is a popular extension for Redux that allows for async actions . Here's a demo that augments useReducer with same pattern (useThunkReducer), codesandbox.io/s/6z4r79ymwr . Notice that dispatched function is async, you can do requests there (commented). – Estus Flask Nov 23 '18 at 15:54
  • 1
    The problem with the question is that you asked about a different thing that wasn't your real case and then changed it, so now it's very different question while existing answers appear as if they just ignored the question. This isn't a recommended practice on SO because it doesn't help you to get an answer you want. Please, don't remove important parts from the question that answers already refer to (calculation formulas). If you still have problems (after my previous comment (you likely do), consider asking a new question that reflects your case and link to this one as your previous attempt. – Estus Flask Nov 23 '18 at 16:05
  • Hi estus, I think this codesandbox codesandbox.io/s/6z4r79ymwr is not updated yet. I will change back the question, sorry for that. – rwinzhang Nov 24 '18 at 4:17
3

Using Ref will introduce a new kind of bug into the app.

Let's see this case using usePrevious that someone commented before:

  1. prop.minTime: 5 ==> ref.current = 5 | set ref.current
  2. prop.minTime: 5 ==> ref.current = 5 | new value is equal to ref.current
  3. prop.minTime: 8 ==> ref.current = 5 | new value is NOT equal to ref.current
  4. prop.minTime: 5 ==> ref.current = 5 | new value is equal to ref.current

As we can see here, we are not updating the internal ref because we are using useEffect

1
  • 1
    React has this example but they are using the state... and not the props... when you care about the old props then error will happened. – santomegonzalo Nov 28 '19 at 16:27
1

Here's a custom hook that I use which I believe is more intuitive than using usePrevious.

import { useRef, useEffect } from 'react'

// useTransition :: Array a => (a -> Void, a) -> Void
//                              |_______|  |
//                                  |      |
//                              callback  deps
//
// The useTransition hook is similar to the useEffect hook. It requires
// a callback function and an array of dependencies. Unlike the useEffect
// hook, the callback function is only called when the dependencies change.
// Hence, it's not called when the component mounts because there is no change
// in the dependencies. The callback function is supplied the previous array of
// dependencies which it can use to perform transition-based effects.
const useTransition = (callback, deps) => {
  const func = useRef(null)

  useEffect(() => {
    func.current = callback
  }, [callback])

  const args = useRef(null)

  useEffect(() => {
    if (args.current !== null) func.current(...args.current)
    args.current = deps
  }, deps)
}

You'd use useTransition as follows.

useTransition((prevRate, prevSendAmount, prevReceiveAmount) => {
  if (sendAmount !== prevSendAmount || rate !== prevRate && sendAmount > 0) {
    const newReceiveAmount = sendAmount * rate
    // do something
  } else {
    const newSendAmount = receiveAmount / rate
    // do something
  }
}, [rate, sendAmount, receiveAmount])

Hope that helps.

0

You can use useImmer opposed to useState and access the state. Example: https://css-tricks.com/build-a-chat-app-using-react-hooks-in-100-lines-of-code/

0

I did not like any of the answers above, I wanted the ability to pass an array of booleans and if one of them is true so rerender

/**
 * effect fires if one of the conditions in the dependency array is true
 */
export const useEffectCompare = (callback: () => void, conditions: boolean[], effect = useEffect) => {
  const shouldUpdate = useRef(false);
  if (conditions.some((cond) => cond)) shouldUpdate.current = !shouldUpdate.current;
  effect(callback, [shouldUpdate.current]);
};

//usage - will fire because one of the dependencies is true.
useEffectCompare(() => {
  console.log('test!');
}, [false, true]);
-1

In your case(simple object):

useEffect(()=>{
  // your logic
}, [rate, sendAmount, receiveAmount])

In other case(complex object)

const {cityInfo} = props;
useEffect(()=>{
  // some logic
}, [cityInfo.cityId])

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