5

I'd like to count the rows in the column input if the values are smaller than the current row (Please see the results wanted below). The issue to me is that the condition is based on current row value, so it is very different from general case where the condition is a fixed number.

data <- data.frame(input = c(1,1,1,1,2,2,3,5,5,5,5,6))

    input
1      1
2      1
3      1
4      1
5      2
6      2
7      3
8      5
9      5
10     5
11     5
12     6

The results I expect to get are like this. For example, for observations 5 and 6 (with value 2), there are 4 observations with value 1 less than their value 2. Hence count is given value 4.

    input count
1      1     0
2      1     0
3      1     0
4      1     0
5      2     4
6      2     4
7      3     6
8      5     7
9      5     7
10     5     7
11     5     7
12     6    11

Edit: as I am dealing with grouped data with dplyr, the ultimate results I wish to get is like below, that is, I am wishing the conditions could be dynamic within each group.

data <- data.frame(id = c(1,1,2,2,2,3,3,4,4,4,4,4), 
input = c(1,1,1,1,2,2,3,5,5,5,5,6), 
count=c(0,0,0,0,2,0,1,0,0,0,0,4))

   id input count
1   1     1     0
2   1     1     0
3   2     1     0
4   2     1     0
5   2     2     2
6   3     2     0
7   3     3     1
8   4     5     0
9   4     5     0
10  4     5     0
11  4     5     0
12  4     6     4

3 Answers 3

5

Here is an option with tidyverse

library(tidyverse)
data %>%
   mutate(count = map_int(input, ~ sum(.x > input))) 
#    input count
#1      1     0
#2      1     0
#3      1     0
#4      1     0
#5      2     4
#6      2     4
#7      3     6
#8      5     7
#9      5     7
#10     5     7
#11     5     7
#12     6    11

Update

With the updated data, add the group by 'id' in the above code

data %>% 
  group_by(id) %>% 
  mutate(count1 = map_int(input, ~ sum(.x > input)))
# A tibble: 12 x 4
# Groups:   id [4]
#      id input count count1
#   <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>  <int>
# 1     1     1     0      0
# 2     1     1     0      0
# 3     2     1     0      0
# 4     2     1     0      0
# 5     2     2     2      2
# 6     3     2     0      0
# 7     3     3     1      1
# 8     4     5     0      0
# 9     4     5     0      0
#10     4     5     0      0
#11     4     5     0      0
#12     4     6     4      4
4

In base R, we can use sapply and for each input count how many values are greater than itself.

data$count <- sapply(data$input, function(x) sum(x > data$input))

data

#   input count
#1      1     0
#2      1     0
#3      1     0
#4      1     0
#5      2     4
#6      2     4
#7      3     6
#8      5     7
#9      5     7
#10     5     7
#11     5     7
#12     6    11

With dplyr one way would be using rowwise function and following the same logic.

library(dplyr)

data %>%
  rowwise() %>%
  mutate(count = sum(input > data$input))
3
  • Thank you very much for your answer! Since I am dealing with group data using dplyr, and the example dataset I presented as is one of the group in my actual dataset, I am just wondering if there is way using dplyr (e.g. using mutate). Thanks! Nov 23, 2018 at 16:30
  • @RickXMan I have shown a way using mutate in the answer for your example.
    – Ronak Shah
    Nov 23, 2018 at 16:33
  • 2
    Thanks @Ronak Shah . I tried to add group_by before it, but it seems rowwise is not compatible with group_by? Nov 23, 2018 at 17:05
4

1. outer and rowSums

data$count <- with(data, rowSums(outer(input, input, `>`)))

2. table and cumsum

tt <- cumsum(table(data$input))
v <- setNames(c(0, head(tt, -1)), c(head(names(tt), -1), tail(names(tt), 1)))
data$count <- v[match(data$input, names(v))]

3. data.table non-equi join

Perhaps more efficient with a non-equi join in data.table. Count number of rows (.N) for each match (by = .EACHI).

library(data.table)
setDT(data)
data[data, on = .(input < input), .N, by = .EACHI]

If your data is grouped by 'id', as in your update, join on that variable as well:

data[data, on = .(id, input < input), .N, by = .EACHI]

#     id input N
#  1:  1     1 0
#  2:  1     1 0
#  3:  2     1 0
#  4:  2     1 0
#  5:  2     2 2
#  6:  3     2 0
#  7:  3     3 1
#  8:  4     5 0
#  9:  4     5 0
# 10:  4     5 0
# 11:  4     5 0
# 12:  4     6 4

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.