4

I have multiple arrays in a main/parent array like this:

var array = [[1, 17], [1, 17], [1, 17], [2, 12], [5, 9], [2, 12], [6, 2], [2, 12]];

here are the array's for simpler reading:

[1, 17]
[1, 17]
[1, 17]
[2, 12]
[5, 9]
[2, 12]
[6, 2]
[2, 12]
[2, 12]

I want to select the arrays that are repeated 3 or more times (> 3) and assign it to a variable. So in this example, var repeatedArrays would be [1, 17] and [2, 12].

So this should be the final result:

console.log(repeatedArrays);
>>> [[1, 17], [2, 12]]

I found something similar here but it uses underscore.js and lodash.

How could I it with javascript or even jquery (if need be)?

  • You could compare them against their JSON values, however, [1, 17] wouldn't match [17, 1] – Get Off My Lawn Nov 23 '18 at 21:03
  • you can accept one answer (if it helps you) by click on big gray check button on its left side. If you wish you can add +10 points to any author of any good answer by click upper gray triangle – Kamil Kiełczewski May 14 at 16:21
9

You could take a Map with stringified arrays and count, then filter by count and restore the arrays.

var array = [[1, 17], [1, 17], [1, 17], [2, 12], [5, 9], [2, 12], [6, 2], [2, 12]],
    result = Array
        .from(array.reduce(
            (map, array) =>
                (json => map.set(json, (map.get(json) || 0) + 1))
                (JSON.stringify(array)),
            new Map
         ))
        .filter(([, count]) => count > 2)
        .map(([json]) => JSON.parse(json));
        
console.log(result);
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

Filter with a map at wanted count.

var array = [[1, 17], [1, 17], [1, 17], [2, 12], [5, 9], [2, 12], [6, 2], [2, 12]],
    result = array.filter(
        (map => a => 
            (json =>
                (count => map.set(json, count) && !(2 - count))
                (1 + map.get(json) || 1)
            )
            (JSON.stringify(a))
        )
        (new Map)
    );
        
console.log(result);
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

Unique!

var array = [[1, 17], [1, 17], [1, 17], [2, 12], [5, 9], [2, 12], [6, 2], [2, 12]],
    result = array.filter(
        (s => a => (j => !s.has(j) && s.add(j))(JSON.stringify(a)))
        (new Set)
    );
        
console.log(result);
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

  • Awesome! This works! Is there any way to remove the duplicated arrays from the original array? So the final output of var array would be [[1, 17], [2, 12], [5, 9], [6, 2]]. I tried filter() and indexOf() but it did not work – Timmy Balk Nov 23 '18 at 21:46
  • for that task, you may use a Set instead of a Map. – Nina Scholz Nov 23 '18 at 21:55
  • Could you please edit your answer and show me? Do I use has()? – Timmy Balk Nov 23 '18 at 21:59
  • @TimmyBalk just remove .filter(([, count]) => count > 2) line - and don't change anything else – Kamil Kiełczewski Nov 23 '18 at 22:00
  • @KamilKiełczewski Excellent! Thank you so much. I'm going to research into the filter() function now, thanks again Nina and Kamil. But i'm assuming removing the .filter line is not the same as what Nina was saying? – Timmy Balk Nov 23 '18 at 22:02
7

Try this

array.filter(( r={}, a=>!(2-(r[a]=++r[a]|0)) ))

Time complexity O(n) (one array pass by filter function). Inspired by Nitish answer.

Explanation

The (r={}, a=>...) will return last expression after comma (which is a=>...) (e.g. (5,6)==6). In r={} we set once temporary object where we will store unique keys. In filter function a=>... in a we have current array element . In r[a] JS implicity cast a to string (e.g 1,17). Then in !(2-(r[a]=++r[a]|0)) we increase counter of occurrence element a and return true (as filter function value) if element a occurred 3 times. If r[a] is undefined the ++r[a] returns NaN, and further NaN|0=0 (also number|0=number). The r[a]= initialise first counter value, if we omit it the ++ will only set NaN to r[a] which is non-incrementable (so we need to put zero at init). If we remove 2- as result we get input array without duplicates - or alternatively we can also get this by a=>!(r[a]=a in r). If we change 2- to 1- we get array with duplicates only.

var array = [[1, 17], [1, 17], [1, 17], [2, 12], [5, 9], [2, 12], [6, 2], [2, 12]];

var r= array.filter(( r={}, a=>!(2-(r[a]=++r[a]|0)) ))

console.log(JSON.stringify(r));

5

You can use Object.reduce, Object.entries for this like below

var array = [[1, 17], [1, 17], [1, 17], [2, 12], [5, 9], [2, 12], [6, 2], [2, 12]];


let res = Object.entries(
            array.reduce((o, d) => {
              let key = d.join('-')
              o[key] = (o[key] || 0) + 1

              return o
          }, {}))
          .flatMap(([k, v]) => v > 2 ? [k.split('-').map(Number)] : [])
  
  
console.log(res)

OR may be just with Array.filters

var array = [[1, 17], [1, 17], [1, 17], [1, 17], [2, 12], [5, 9], [2, 12], [6, 2], [2, 12]];

let temp = {}
let res = array.filter(d => {
  let key = d.join('-')
  temp[key] = (temp[key] || 0) + 1
  
  return temp[key] == 3
})

console.log(res)

  • 1
    First snipped don't meet requirements (return elements are strings not nubmers) - but the second snipped is brilliant, +1 – Kamil Kiełczewski Nov 23 '18 at 21:58
  • Thank you @KamilKiełczewski. Updated first snippet to return Numbers. – Nitish Narang Nov 24 '18 at 4:19
4

For a different take, you can first sort your list, then loop through once and pull out the elements that meet your requirement. This will probably be faster than stringifying keys from the array even with the sort:

var arr = [[1, 17], [1, 17], [1, 17], [2, 12], [5, 9], [2, 12], [6, 2], [2, 12]]
arr.sort((a, b) => a[0] - b[0] || a[1] - b[1])

// define equal for array
const equal = (arr1, arr2) => arr1.every((n, j) => n === arr2[j])

let GROUP_SIZE = 3
first = 0, last = 1, res = []

while(last < arr.length){
    if (equal(arr[first], arr[last])) last++
    else {
        if (last - first >= GROUP_SIZE)  res.push(arr[first])
        first = last
    }
}
if (last - first >= GROUP_SIZE)  res.push(arr[first])
console.log(res)

  • Interesting approach, but is it really faster? – Timmy Balk Nov 23 '18 at 21:52
  • 1
    @TimmyBalk this isn't a criticism of the JSON approach -- I think it's good, but if my test is correct, it is slower (at least on my browser). Here's a jsperf test: jsperf.com/2json-v-sort-loop – Mark Meyer Nov 23 '18 at 21:55
1

ES6:

const repeatMap = {}

array.forEach(arr => {
  const key = JSON.stringify(arr)
  if (repeatMap[key]) {
    repeatMap[key]++
  } else {
    repeatMap[key] = 1
  }
})

const repeatedArrays = Object.keys(repeatMap)
  .filter(key => repeatMap[key] >= 3)
  .map(key => JSON.parse(key))
1

You could also do this with a single Array.reduce where you would only push to a result property if the length is equal to 3:

var array = [[1, 17], [1, 17], [1, 17], [1, 17], [2, 12], [5, 9], [2, 12], [6, 2], [2, 12]];

console.log(array.reduce((r,c) => {
  let key = c.join('-')
  r[key] = (r[key] || 0) + 1
  r[key] == 3 ? r.result.push(c) : 0  // if we have a hit push to result
  return r
}, { result: []}).result)             // print the result property

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