15

I have been trying to use the savetxt function in numpy. The problem I am running into is that even thought I define my variables accordingly, i.e. int() or double(), the text file i am getting out has floats in them. How can I change that?

Input is as follows: pNoise=[int(i), around(pNoise[0], decimals=3), around(pNoise[1], decimals=3), around(pNoise[2], decimals=3)]

savetxt line is as follows: savetxt(noutF, pNoisetot)

What I expect is: 0 1.567 8.865 instead I get 0.000000000000000000e+00 1.015909999999999940e+02 2.600000000000000089e-01

3
  • 1
    What's the difference between float64 and double? – Gabe Mar 17 '11 at 23:16
  • 1
    It sounds like maybe you have the wrong format string. Show us your complete savetxt call with a sample of its output and a sample of what you expect. – Gabe Mar 17 '11 at 23:19
  • Input is as follows: pNoise=[int(i), around(pNoise[0], decimals=3), around(pNoise[1], decimals=3), around(pNoise[2], decimals=3)] savetxt line is as follows: savetxt( noutF ,pNoisetot) @Gabe – madtowneast Mar 18 '11 at 15:01
27

You can define how the output has to be formatted with the fmt parameter of np.savetxt, eg:

np.savetxt("file.txt", output, fmt='%10.5f', delimiter='\t')

for floats rounded to five decimals, or fmt='%i' to have the output as integers.

Here you can find more information about the possibilities of fmt:

http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.savetxt.html

2
  • Thanks I read the documentation beforehand, but my problem is that I actually am trying to ahve something like int(i) double() double() @joris – madtowneast Mar 18 '11 at 15:12
  • 4
    If you want different columns have a different format, you also can specify this. In your case this would be: fmt='%i %10.3f %10.3f' – joris Mar 18 '11 at 17:47
5

In case you want to specify the number of decimals in the float the

np.savetxt("file.txt", output, fmt='%10.5f', delimiter='\t')

7 decimals in this case

np.savetxt("file.txt", output, fmt='%10.7f', delimiter='\t')

Basically, fmt = %10.Yf' where Y specifies the number of decs.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.