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Let's say I need to call a function twice. The usual way to do it would be:

func main() {
    var wg sync.WaitGroup
    wg.Add(2)

    go func() {
        doSomething(A)          
        wg.Done()
    }()

    go func() {
        doSomething(B)
        wg.Done()
    }()
    wg.Wait()
}

But what about writing it like this ?

func main() {
    var wg sync.WaitGroup
    wg.Add(2)

    go func() {
        doSomething(A)          
        wg.Done()
    }()

    doSomething(B)
    wg.Done()
    wg.Wait()
}

We spare ourselves the creation of one goroutines, while making use of the main goroutine. But I've never seen it written like that in any tutorial. Is it wrong to do this? I've done tests and the output are just as I though the same.

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  • 3
    Your second version will work, but there's no reason to use wg.Add(2) instead of just wg.Add(1), then eliminate the wg.Done() in main(). The main reason for the first version, IMO, would be readability. It's more clear what you're doing in the first version. Nov 26, 2018 at 13:49
  • @Flimzy Oh thank you ! I didn't thought of that. But theoretically the second option would be faster right ? if let's say, the code is called thousands of times
    – Dylan
    Nov 26, 2018 at 13:52
  • 1
    Both will work, but I will prefer whatever is more readable and that is really dependent on what doSomething() is. At first glance, the first option is easier to grasp since the nesting levels are the same. Moreover, unless proven by your tests that one more goroutine is causing you slow runtimes, then prefer simplicity. Note that goroutines should be cheap. Goroutines are far cheaper than OS threads.
    – ssemilla
    Nov 26, 2018 at 13:53
  • 2
    @Dylan: The best way to know which is faster is to benchmark both versions. In theory, the second might be imperceivably faster. But premature optimization is the root of all evil. Please, please, please, optimize for your developer's time, not for your CPU's time, until you have a reason to do otherwise. Nov 26, 2018 at 13:57

1 Answer 1

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Both are correct. The first form is cleaner and scales well if you intend to extend your code later, e.g. if you later decide you want to launch not 2 but 3 or 4 or N goroutines, the code will not change in structure, you just add the additional goroutines.

Another reason why the first form is "popular" is because often after launching the "worker" goroutines there are more things to do which may be executed on this goroutine (before wg.Done() is called).

The 2nd form on the other hand is more efficient, as it only launches one additional goroutine. Goroutines are lightweight, cheap, but they are not "free". This may be improved further by using the WaitGroup to only "track" the launched goroutine, obviously the "main" that calls wg.Wait() does not need to wait for itself explicitly. And if only 1 goroutine remains, you may use other synchronization means instead of WaitGroup (e.g. a channel).

So basically if performance is critial, use the 2nd approach.

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