37

After C++11, I thought of c_str() and data() equivalently.

C++17 introduces an overload for the latter, that returns a non-constant pointer (reference, which I am not sure if it's updated completely w.r.t. C++17):

const CharT* data() const;    (1)   
CharT* data();                (2)   (since C++17)

c_str() does only return a constant pointer:

const CharT* c_str() const;

Why the differentiation of these two methods in C++17, especially when C++11 was the one that made them homogeneous? In other words, why only the one method got an overload, while the other didn't?

  • 4
    my bet is that is has to do with c_str being null terminated, while a std::string may contain a null in the middle and I'd expect also data() to return just the raw buffer (whether it contains null in the middle or not) – formerlyknownas_463035818 Nov 27 '18 at 13:11
  • @user463035818 they both return the same in this bad example I made... – gsamaras Nov 27 '18 at 13:20
  • Possible duplicate of Why Doesn't string::data() Provide a Mutable char*? – Jonathan Mee Nov 27 '18 at 15:34
  • @JonathanMee thanks for sharing, but where does this answer my question? From what I can understand from the answers here, "we can only speculate". I don't see how this is a duplicate, but if I am wrong, please let me know. :) – gsamaras Nov 27 '18 at 15:37
  • My understanding was you were asking for the context of the decision why a non-constant data was added. I believe that is covered in detail in the other question? – Jonathan Mee Nov 27 '18 at 15:41
22

The new overload was added by P0272R1 for C++17. Neither the paper itself nor the links therein discuss why only data was given new overloads but c_str was not. We can only speculate at this point (unless people involved in the discussion chime in), but I'd like to offer the following points for consideration:

  • Even just adding the overload to data broke some code; keeping this change conservative was a way to minimize negative impact.

  • The c_str function had so far been entirely identical to data and is effectively a "legacy" facility for interfacing code that takes "C string", i.e. an immutable, null-terminated char array. Since you can always replace c_str by data, there's no particular reason to add to this legacy interface.

I realize that the very motivation for P0292R1 was that there do exist legacy APIs that erroneously or for C reasons take only mutable pointers even though they don't mutate. All the same, I suppose we don't want to add more to string's already massive API that absolutely necessary.

One more point: as of C++17 you are now allowed to write to the null terminator, as long as you write the value zero. (Previously, it used to be UB to write anything to the null terminator.) A mutable c_str would create yet another entry point into this particular subtlety, and the fewer subtleties we have, the better.

  • Yes I couldn't find any relevant information on that document on why c_str() didn't get an overload too... Thank you for the answer! – gsamaras Nov 27 '18 at 13:18
  • @gsamaras: No problem -- I added a note about writing to the null terminator. – Kerrek SB Nov 27 '18 at 13:20
  • Also, I can easily imagine a non-const c_str() overload breaking legacy code. Think about calling it on a non-const string, with an auto return type. – rustyx Nov 27 '18 at 13:21
  • @rustyx: The new data overload absolutely did break code. We coped, but it's not something you want to do gratuitously. – Kerrek SB Nov 27 '18 at 13:24
  • @KerrekSB yesterday in my sleep I was thinking about your first bullet. Why the non-const overload would break things? I mean wouldn't it be that where the const is needed, the relevant const overload of the method would be called? – gsamaras Nov 28 '18 at 8:07
21

The reason why the data() member got an overload is explained in this paper at open-std.org.

TL;DR of the paper: The non-const .data() member function for std::string was added to improve uniformity in the standard library and to help C++ developers write correct code. It is also convenient when calling a C-library function that doesn't have const qualification on its C-string parameters.

Some relevant passages from the paper:

Abstract
Is std::string's lack of a non-const .data() member function an oversight or an intentional design based on pre-C++11 std::string semantics? In either case, this lack of functionality tempts developers to use unsafe alternatives in several legitimate scenarios. This paper argues for the addition of a non-const .data() member function for std::string to improve uniformity in the standard library and to help C++ developers write correct code.

Use Cases
C libraries occasionally include routines that have char * parameters. One example is the lpCommandLine parameter of the CreateProcess function in the Windows API. Because the data() member of std::string is const, it cannot be used to make std::string objects work with the lpCommandLine parameter. Developers are tempted to use .front() instead, as in the following example.

std::string programName;
// ...
if( CreateProcess( NULL, &programName.front(), /* etc. */ ) ) {
  // etc.
} else {
  // handle error
}

Note that when programName is empty, the programName.front() expression causes undefined behavior. A temporary empty C-string fixes the bug.

std::string programName;
// ...

if( !programName.empty() ) { 
  char emptyString[] = {'\0'};    
  if( CreateProcess( NULL, programName.empty() ? emptyString : &programName.front(), /* etc. */ ) ) {
    // etc.
  } else {
    // handle error
  }
}

If there were a non-const .data() member, as there is with std::vector, the correct code would be straightforward.

std::string programName;
// ...
if( !programName.empty() ) {
  char emptyString[] = {'\0'};
  if( CreateProcess( NULL, programName.data(), /* etc. */ ) ) {
    // etc.
  } else {
    // handle error
  }
}

A non-const .data() std::string member function is also convenient when calling a C-library function that doesn't have const qualification on its C-string parameters. This is common in older codes and those that need to be portable with older C compilers.

5

It just depends on the semantics of "what you want to do with it". Generally speaking, std::string is sometimes used as a buffer vector, i.e., as a replacement to std::vector<char>. This can be seen in boost::asio often. In other words, it's an array of characters.

c_str(): strictly means that you're looking for a null-terminated string. In that sense, you should never modify the data and you should never need the string as a non-const.

data(): you may need the information inside the string as buffer data, and even as non-const. You may or may not need to modify the data, which you can do, as long as it doesn't involve changing the length of the string.

  • 3
    I think the null-termination is a red herring here. Both c_str and data are absolutely equivalent regarding null termination. – Kerrek SB Nov 27 '18 at 13:15
  • 1
    @KerrekSB is right, after C++11 both methods return a null terminated string. – gsamaras Nov 27 '18 at 13:16
  • 2
    @KerrekSB It's not about the null-termination in the sense of whether it exists or not. It's in the sense whether you want "null-terminated string" or "buffer vector", where you don't care about null termination. – The Quantum Physicist Nov 27 '18 at 13:16
  • @TheQuantumPhysicist: Yes, I see your point, but I would somewhat like to dispel the idea that you shouldn't use data to request null-termination (which you may or may not want to imply). It's perfectly fine to use data for the express purpose of getting a null-terminated string; I would not ask anyone to use c_str instead. – Kerrek SB Nov 27 '18 at 13:18
  • 2
    @KerrekSB You're right, but keep in mind that C++ is an expressive language, and the text of the code you write should ideally have meaning. Personally I'd consider it bad practice to use data() if all you want is a null-terminated string. You wouldn't be helping the guy who reads your code next. It's my opinion, anyway :-) – The Quantum Physicist Nov 27 '18 at 13:21
3

The two member functions c_str and data of std::string exist due to the history of the std::string class.

Until C++11, a std::string could have been implemented as copy-on-write. The internal representation did not need any null termination of the stored string. The member function c_str made sure the returned string was null terminated. The member function data simlpy returned a pointer to the stored string, that was not necessarily null terminated. - To be sure that changes to the string were noticed to enable copy-on-write, both functions needed to return a pointer to const data.

This all changed with C++11 when copy-on-write was no longer allowed for std::string. Since c_str was still required to deliver a null terminated string, the null is always appended to the actual stored string. Otherwise a call to c_str may need to change the stored data to make the string null terminated which would make c_str a non-const function. Since data delivers a pointer to the stored string, it usually has the same implementation as c_str. Both functions still exists due to backward compatibility.

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