78

Is it possible to search every column of every table for a particular value in PostgreSQL?

A similar question is available here for Oracle.

  • Are you looking for a tool or for an implementation of the procedures shown in the linked question? – a_horse_with_no_name Mar 18 '11 at 9:49
  • No, just the simplest way to find a specific value in all fields/tables. – Sandro Munda Mar 18 '11 at 9:51
  • So you don't want to use an external tool? – a_horse_with_no_name Mar 18 '11 at 9:56
  • 1
    If it's the simplest way => ok for an external tool :-) – Sandro Munda Mar 18 '11 at 9:59
99

How about dumping the contents of the database, then using grep?

$ pg_dump --data-only --inserts -U postgres your-db-name > a.tmp
$ grep United a.tmp
INSERT INTO countries VALUES ('US', 'United States');
INSERT INTO countries VALUES ('GB', 'United Kingdom');

The same utility, pg_dump, can include column names in the output. Just change --inserts to --column-inserts. That way you can search for specific column names, too. But if I were looking for column names, I'd probably dump the schema instead of the data.

$ pg_dump --data-only --column-inserts -U postgres your-db-name > a.tmp
$ grep country_code a.tmp
INSERT INTO countries (iso_country_code, iso_country_name) VALUES ('US', 'United  States');
INSERT INTO countries (iso_country_code, iso_country_name) VALUES ('GB', 'United Kingdom');
  • 4
    +1 free and simple. And if you want structure pg_dump can do that too. Also if grep isn't your thing use what ever file content searching tool you want on the dumped out structures and/or data. – Kuberchaun Mar 18 '11 at 12:17
  • If you want to grep text data (which is typically encoded in more recent versions of postgres), you may need to ALTER DATABASE your_db_name SET bytea_output = 'escape'; on the database (or a copy thereof) before dumping it. (I'm not seeing a way to specify this just for a pg_dump command.) – phils Aug 10 '15 at 3:01
  • can you explain in detail .. ? How to search string 'ABC' into all tables ? – Mr. Bhosale Jan 28 '17 at 6:47
  • If you're using IntelliJ you can just right-click your db and select "Dump with 'pg_dump'" or "Dump data to file(s)" – Laurens Nov 29 '17 at 12:26
  • How is this a valid solution for any database that's sufficiently large that you can't dump it to your disk? – Govind Parmar Mar 6 at 17:21
50

Here's a pl/pgsql function that locates records where any column contains a specific value. It takes as arguments the value to search in text format, an array of table names to search into (defaults to all tables) and an array of schema names (defaults all schema names).

It returns a table structure with schema, name of table, name of column and pseudo-column ctid (non-durable physical location of the row in the table, see System Columns)

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION search_columns(
    needle text,
    haystack_tables name[] default '{}',
    haystack_schema name[] default '{}'
)
RETURNS table(schemaname text, tablename text, columnname text, rowctid text)
AS $$
begin
  FOR schemaname,tablename,columnname IN
      SELECT c.table_schema,c.table_name,c.column_name
      FROM information_schema.columns c
      JOIN information_schema.tables t ON
        (t.table_name=c.table_name AND t.table_schema=c.table_schema)
      WHERE (c.table_name=ANY(haystack_tables) OR haystack_tables='{}')
        AND (c.table_schema=ANY(haystack_schema) OR haystack_schema='{}')
        AND t.table_type='BASE TABLE'
  LOOP
    EXECUTE format('SELECT ctid FROM %I.%I WHERE cast(%I as text)=%L',
       schemaname,
       tablename,
       columnname,
       needle
    ) INTO rowctid;
    IF rowctid is not null THEN
      RETURN NEXT;
    END IF;
 END LOOP;
END;
$$ language plpgsql;

EDIT: this code is for PG 9.1 or newer. Also, you might want the version on github based on the same principle but adding some speed and reporting improvements.

Examples of use in a test database:

Search in all tables within public schema:

select * from search_columns('foobar');
 schemaname | tablename | columnname | rowctid 
------------+-----------+------------+---------
 public     | s3        | usename    | (0,11)
 public     | s2        | relname    | (7,29)
 public     | w         | body       | (0,2)
(3 rows)

Search in a specific table:

 select * from search_columns('foobar','{w}');
 schemaname | tablename | columnname | rowctid 
------------+-----------+------------+---------
 public     | w         | body       | (0,2)
(1 row)

Search in a subset of tables obtained from a select:

select * from search_columns('foobar', array(select table_name::name from information_schema.tables where table_name like 's%'), array['public']);
 schemaname | tablename | columnname | rowctid 
------------+-----------+------------+---------
 public     | s2        | relname    | (7,29)
 public     | s3        | usename    | (0,11)
(2 rows)

Get a result row with the corresponding base table and and ctid:

select * from public.w where ctid='(0,2)';
 title |  body  |         tsv         
-------+--------+---------------------
 toto  | foobar | 'foobar':2 'toto':1

To test again a regular expression instead of strict equality, like grep, this:

SELECT ctid FROM %I.%I WHERE cast(%I as text)=%L

may be changed to:

SELECT ctid FROM %I.%I WHERE cast(%I as text) ~ %L
  • ERROR: syntax error at or near "default" LINE 3: haystack_tables name[] default '{}' (Using PostgreSQL 8.2.17 and cannot upgrade) – Henno May 11 '14 at 8:54
  • @Henno: yes it requires PG-9.1. Edited now to make that explicit. To use it with older versions, you'll have to adapt it. – Daniel Vérité May 11 '14 at 12:27
  • Unfortunately I don't feel my skills + time is sufficient for that... I tried googling for postgresql function default argument but I'm not even sure if the problem is name[] or the default keyword. – Henno May 11 '14 at 17:32
  • @Henno: I'm sure it's default and the 2nd problem will be format() which appeared in 9.1. What you may do is post a question linking to this one and asking how to convert that to 8.2. Also maybe you don't need these haystack* parameters if you need to search in every schema/every table. – Daniel Vérité May 11 '14 at 18:16
  • 2
    Very nice solution, thanks ! – Laurent Jégou Aug 25 '16 at 8:43
10

The only tool I know which can do that is: SQL Workbench/J: http://www.sql-workbench.net/

A Java/JDBC based tool which offers a special (proprietary) SQL "command" to search through all (or just selected) tables in a database:

http://www.sql-workbench.eu/manual/wb-commands.html#command-search-data
http://www.sql-workbench.eu/wbgrepdata_png.html

  • Do you know if is it possible to search the name of a specific column instead of a specific data ? Thanks. – Sandro Munda Mar 18 '11 at 10:18
4

And if someone think it could help. Here is @Daniel Vérité's function, with another param that accept names of columns that can be used in search. This way it decrease the time of processing. At least in my test it reduced a lot.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION search_columns(
    needle text,
    haystack_columns name[] default '{}',
    haystack_tables name[] default '{}',
    haystack_schema name[] default '{public}'
)
RETURNS table(schemaname text, tablename text, columnname text, rowctid text)
AS $$
begin
  FOR schemaname,tablename,columnname IN
      SELECT c.table_schema,c.table_name,c.column_name
      FROM information_schema.columns c
      JOIN information_schema.tables t ON
        (t.table_name=c.table_name AND t.table_schema=c.table_schema)
      WHERE (c.table_name=ANY(haystack_tables) OR haystack_tables='{}')
        AND c.table_schema=ANY(haystack_schema)
        AND (c.column_name=ANY(haystack_columns) OR haystack_columns='{}')
        AND t.table_type='BASE TABLE'
  LOOP
    EXECUTE format('SELECT ctid FROM %I.%I WHERE cast(%I as text)=%L',
       schemaname,
       tablename,
       columnname,
       needle
    ) INTO rowctid;
    IF rowctid is not null THEN
      RETURN NEXT;
    END IF;
 END LOOP;
END;
$$ language plpgsql;

Bellow is an example of usage of the search_function created above.

SELECT * FROM search_columns('86192700'
    , array(SELECT DISTINCT a.column_name::name FROM information_schema.columns AS a
            INNER JOIN information_schema.tables as b ON (b.table_catalog = a.table_catalog AND b.table_schema = a.table_schema AND b.table_name = a.table_name)
        WHERE 
            a.column_name iLIKE '%cep%' 
            AND b.table_type = 'BASE TABLE'
            AND b.table_schema = 'public'
    )

    , array(SELECT b.table_name::name FROM information_schema.columns AS a
            INNER JOIN information_schema.tables as b ON (b.table_catalog = a.table_catalog AND b.table_schema = a.table_schema AND b.table_name = a.table_name)
        WHERE 
            a.column_name iLIKE '%cep%' 
            AND b.table_type = 'BASE TABLE'
            AND b.table_schema = 'public')
);
4

Without storing a new procedure you can use a code block and execute to obtain a table of occurences. You can filter results by schema, table or column name.

DO $$
DECLARE
  value int := 0;
  sql text := 'The constructed select statement';
  rec1 record;
  rec2 record;
BEGIN
  DROP TABLE IF EXISTS _x;
  CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE _x (
    schema_name text, 
    table_name text, 
    column_name text,
    found text
  );
  FOR rec1 IN 
        SELECT table_schema, table_name, column_name
        FROM information_schema.columns 
        WHERE table_name <> '_x'
                AND UPPER(column_name) LIKE UPPER('%%')                  
                AND table_schema <> 'pg_catalog'
                AND table_schema <> 'information_schema'
                AND data_type IN ('character varying', 'text', 'character', 'char', 'varchar')
        LOOP
    sql := concat('SELECT ', rec1."column_name", ' AS "found" FROM ',rec1."table_schema" , '.',rec1."table_name" , ' WHERE UPPER(',rec1."column_name" , ') LIKE UPPER(''','%my_substring_to_find_goes_here%' , ''')');
    RAISE NOTICE '%', sql;
    BEGIN
        FOR rec2 IN EXECUTE sql LOOP
            RAISE NOTICE '%', sql;
            INSERT INTO _x VALUES (rec1."table_schema", rec1."table_name", rec1."column_name", rec2."found");
        END LOOP;
    EXCEPTION WHEN OTHERS THEN
    END;
  END LOOP;
  END; $$;

SELECT * FROM _x;
  • Where do you specify the search string? Or is this just dumping the entire DB, table by table? – jimtut Aug 16 '17 at 17:24
  • 1
    I did not created a parameter for the string. You can either hardcode it and run it direcly as a block or create a stored procedure from it. In any case, your string to search goes here between the two percent signs: WHERE UPPER(',rec1."column_name" , ') LIKE UPPER(''','%%' , ''') – profimedica Aug 16 '17 at 22:13
3

to search every column of every table for a particular value

This does not define how to match exactly.
Nor does it define what to return exactly.

Assuming:

  • Find any row with any column containing the given value in its text representation - as opposed to equaling the given value.
  • Return the table name (regclass) and the item pointer (ctid), because that's simplest.

Here is a dead simple, fast and slightly dirty way:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION search_whole_db(_like_pattern text)
  RETURNS TABLE(_tbl regclass, _ctid tid) AS
$func$
BEGIN
   FOR _tbl IN
      SELECT c.oid::regclass
      FROM   pg_class c
      JOIN   pg_namespace n ON n.oid = relnamespace
      WHERE  c.relkind = 'r'                           -- only tables
      AND    n.nspname !~ '^(pg_|information_schema)'  -- exclude system schemas
      ORDER BY n.nspname, c.relname
   LOOP
      RETURN QUERY EXECUTE format(
         'SELECT $1, ctid FROM %s t WHERE t::text ~~ %L'
       , _tbl, '%' || _like_pattern || '%')
      USING _tbl;
   END LOOP;
END
$func$  LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Call:

SELECT * FROM search_whole_db('mypattern');

Provide the search pattern without enclosing %.

Why slightly dirty?

If separators and decorators for the row in text representation can be part of the search pattern, there can be false positives:

  • column separator: , by default
  • whole row is enclosed in parentheses:()
  • some values are enclosed in double quotes "
  • \ may be added as escape char

And the text representation of some columns may depend on local settings - but that ambiguity is inherent to the question, not to my solution.

Each qualifying row is returned once only, even when it matches multiple times (as opposed to other answers here).

This searches the whole DB except for system catalogs. Will typically take a long time to finish. You might want to restrict to certain schemas / tables (or even columns) like demonstrated in other answers. Or add notices and a progress indicator, also demonstrated in another answer.

The regclass object identifier type is represented as table name, schema-qualified where necessary to disambiguate according to the current search_path:

What is the ctid?

You might want to escape characters with special meaning in the search pattern. See:

2

Here's @Daniel Vérité's function with progress reporting functionality. It reports progress in three ways:

  1. by RAISE NOTICE;
  2. by decreasing value of supplied {progress_seq} sequence from {total number of colums to search in} down to 0;
  3. by writing the progress along with found tables into text file, located in c:\windows\temp\{progress_seq}.txt.

_

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION search_columns(
    needle text,
    haystack_tables name[] default '{}',
    haystack_schema name[] default '{public}',
    progress_seq text default NULL
)
RETURNS table(schemaname text, tablename text, columnname text, rowctid text)
AS $$
DECLARE
currenttable text;
columnscount integer;
foundintables text[];
foundincolumns text[];
begin
currenttable='';
columnscount = (SELECT count(1)
      FROM information_schema.columns c
      JOIN information_schema.tables t ON
        (t.table_name=c.table_name AND t.table_schema=c.table_schema)
      WHERE (c.table_name=ANY(haystack_tables) OR haystack_tables='{}')
        AND c.table_schema=ANY(haystack_schema)
        AND t.table_type='BASE TABLE')::integer;
PERFORM setval(progress_seq::regclass, columnscount);

  FOR schemaname,tablename,columnname IN
      SELECT c.table_schema,c.table_name,c.column_name
      FROM information_schema.columns c
      JOIN information_schema.tables t ON
        (t.table_name=c.table_name AND t.table_schema=c.table_schema)
      WHERE (c.table_name=ANY(haystack_tables) OR haystack_tables='{}')
        AND c.table_schema=ANY(haystack_schema)
        AND t.table_type='BASE TABLE'
  LOOP
    EXECUTE format('SELECT ctid FROM %I.%I WHERE cast(%I as text)=%L',
       schemaname,
       tablename,
       columnname,
       needle
    ) INTO rowctid;
    IF rowctid is not null THEN
      RETURN NEXT;
      foundintables = foundintables || tablename;
      foundincolumns = foundincolumns || columnname;
      RAISE NOTICE 'FOUND! %, %, %, %', schemaname,tablename,columnname, rowctid;
    END IF;
         IF (progress_seq IS NOT NULL) THEN 
        PERFORM nextval(progress_seq::regclass);
    END IF;
    IF(currenttable<>tablename) THEN  
    currenttable=tablename;
     IF (progress_seq IS NOT NULL) THEN 
        RAISE NOTICE 'Columns left to look in: %; looking in table: %', currval(progress_seq::regclass), tablename;
        EXECUTE 'COPY (SELECT unnest(string_to_array(''Current table (column ' || columnscount-currval(progress_seq::regclass) || ' of ' || columnscount || '): ' || tablename || '\n\nFound in tables/columns:\n' || COALESCE(
        (SELECT string_agg(c1 || '/' || c2, '\n') FROM (SELECT unnest(foundintables) AS c1,unnest(foundincolumns) AS c2) AS t1)
        , '') || ''',''\n''))) TO ''c:\WINDOWS\temp\' || progress_seq || '.txt''';
    END IF;
    END IF;
 END LOOP;
END;
$$ language plpgsql;
1

-- Below function will list all the tables which contain a specific string in the database

 select TablesCount(‘StringToSearch’);

--Iterates through all the tables in the database

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION **TablesCount**(_searchText TEXT)
RETURNS text AS 
$$ -- here start procedural part
   DECLARE _tname text;
   DECLARE cnt int;
   BEGIN
    FOR _tname IN SELECT table_name FROM information_schema.tables where table_schema='public' and table_type='BASE TABLE'  LOOP
         cnt= getMatchingCount(_tname,Columnames(_tname,_searchText));
                                RAISE NOTICE 'Count% ', CONCAT('  ',cnt,' Table name: ', _tname);
                END LOOP;
    RETURN _tname;
   END;
$$ -- here finish procedural part
LANGUAGE plpgsql; -- language specification

-- Returns the count of tables for which the condition is met. -- For example, if the intended text exists in any of the fields of the table, -- then the count will be greater than 0. We can find the notifications -- in the Messages section of the result viewer in postgres database.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION **getMatchingCount**(_tname TEXT, _clause TEXT)
RETURNS int AS 
$$
Declare outpt text;
    BEGIN
    EXECUTE 'Select Count(*) from '||_tname||' where '|| _clause
       INTO outpt;
       RETURN outpt;
    END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

--Get the fields of each table. Builds the where clause with all columns of a table.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION **Columnames**(_tname text,st text)
RETURNS text AS 
$$ -- here start procedural part
DECLARE
                _name text;
                _helper text;
   BEGIN
                FOR _name IN SELECT column_name FROM information_schema.Columns WHERE table_name =_tname LOOP
                                _name=CONCAT('CAST(',_name,' as VarChar)',' like ','''%',st,'%''', ' OR ');
                                _helper= CONCAT(_helper,_name,' ');
                END LOOP;
                RETURN CONCAT(_helper, ' 1=2');

   END;
$$ -- here finish procedural part
LANGUAGE plpgsql; -- language specification

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