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Is it better in practice to make sure the algorithm only initiates the function if there is a need to do so or to just initiate the function in jquery? as an example lets use these pieces of code. imagine a web page has a considerable amount of divs like 1000 or something some of them are nested like a regular web page and how would the programme behave in a $(window).scroll(function(){}); as apposed to a $("element").click(function(){});. the function fires regardless of weather or not it needs to doesn't it? and might that have performance side effects?

$("div").css({"display":"none"});

or

    $("div").each(function(){ 

if ( $(this).css("display") !== "none" ) { 
$(this).css({"display":"none"}); 
} 

});

or even

 $("div").each(function(){ 

if ( $(this).is(":visible") ) { 
$(this).css({"display":"none"}); 
} 

});

Please give a detailed explanation on which is better in practice

marked as duplicate by Taplar, Quentin javascript Nov 27 '18 at 18:24

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  • Checking the current CSS status is expensive, so the simple approach is best. – Pointy Nov 27 '18 at 17:33
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    "Which is faster" is usually solvable with actual time tests against your actual page, because things can be different. However, my assumption would be the first one, as it is less operations. – Taplar Nov 27 '18 at 17:34
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    It depends entirely on the state of the DOM, how many elements you're affecting and what you're doing with them. The first is by far the most succinct, though. I'd argue that If you're that concerned about performance then you shouldn't be using jQuery at all. If you want to test performance yourself go to jsperf.com – Rory McCrossan Nov 27 '18 at 17:34
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    Also, as a side note, that I would assume that adding/removing a class is much faster than specifically setting display, but I've not tested it – Rory McCrossan Nov 27 '18 at 17:35
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    @VelimirTchatchevsky It would "solve the riddle" in the specific circumstances of the test, not generally, and likely not in the circumstances of the OP. – Heretic Monkey Nov 27 '18 at 18:25

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