3

considering the code below, can we consider it parallel even if there are no loops?

#include <omp.h>

int main(void) {
  #pragma omp parallel
  {
    int a = 1;
    a = 0;
  }
  return 0;
}
5
  • 1
    Why not? There will be a number of threads which all initialize a variable and then end. See here: "When a parallel region is encountered, a logical team of threads is formed. Each thread in the team executes all statements within a parallel region"
    – Yastanub
    Nov 27, 2018 at 18:00
  • @Yastanub Yes but all threads do the same thing so it's not really any sort of parallelism, is it? There are no benefits from parallelizing this I think.
    – user7475082
    Nov 27, 2018 at 18:05
  • They do the same thing parallely(odd word does it exist?). It might not make sense in this case or be useful but it is indeed several threads doing the same task alongside.
    – Yastanub
    Nov 27, 2018 at 18:08
  • @Yastanub, there is a word "parallelly" (note spelling), but it is far more common to say "in parallel", instead. Example: they do the same thing in parallel. Nov 27, 2018 at 19:13
  • I'm afraid this question is unclear and/or trivial. The presented code consists of parallel and serial parts and does in fact not do any work that won't be optimized out by a compiler. By definition everything in the parallel section is parallel so ... everything in the parallel section is parallel ... even though there may not be anything in the parallel section.
    – Zulan
    Nov 27, 2018 at 22:52

1 Answer 1

6

Direct Answer:

Yes, here, the section of your code,

int a = 1;
a = 0;

Runs in parallel, P times, where P is the number of cores on your machine.

For example on a four core machine, the following code (with the relevant imports),

int main(void) {
    #pragma omp parallel
    {
        printf("Thread number %d", omp_get_thread_num());
    }
    return 0;
}

would output:

Thread number 0
Thread number 1
Thread number 2
Thread number 3

Note that when running in parallel, there is no guarantee on the order of the output, so the output could just as likely be something like:

Thread number 1
Thread number 2
Thread number 0
Thread number 3

Additionally, if you wanted to specify the number of threads used in the parallel region, instead of #pragma omp parallel you could write, #pragma omp parallel num_threads(4).


Further Explanation:

If you are still confused, it may be helpful to better understand the difference between parallel for loops and parallel code regions.

#pragma omp parallel tells the compiler that the following code block may be executed in parallel. It guarantees that all code within the parallel region will have finished execution before continuing to subsequent code.

In the following (toy) example, the programmer is guaranteed that after the parallel region, the array will have all entries set to zero.

int *arr = malloc(sizeof(int) * 128); 
const int P = omp_get_max_threads();

#pragma omp parallel num_threads(P)
{
    int local_start = omp_get_thread_num();
    int local_end = local_start + (100 / P);
    for (int i = local_start; i < local_end; ++i) {
        arr[i] = 0;
    }

}
// any code from here onward is guaranteed that arr contains all zeros!

Ignoring differences in scheduling, this task could equivalently be accomplished using a parallel for loop as follows:

int *arr = malloc(sizeof(int) * 128); 
const int P = omp_get_max_threads();

#pragma omp parallel num_threads(P) for
for (int i = 0; i < 128; ++i) {
    arr[i] = 0;
}
// any code from here onward is guaranteed that arr contains all zeros!

Essentially, #pragma omp parallel enables you to describe regions of code that can execute in parallel - this can be much more flexible than a parallel for loop. In contrast, #pragma omp parallel for should generally be used to parallelize loops with independent iterations.

I can further elaborate on the differences in performance, if you would like.

3
  • There is a circular declaration in : const int P = omp_get_num_threads(); and #pragma omp parallel num_threads(P) which would basically mean: set the number of threads to whatever is the number of threads. The caveat is, calling omp_get_num_threads() outside of a parallel region will always return 1; so essentially this code will not do anything in parallel. The proper way to do would be to remove num_thread(P)from the parrallel clause (let there be any number of threads) and move the declaration const int P = omp_get_num_threads(); at the start of the parallel block
    – Brice
    Nov 29, 2018 at 10:55
  • Good point, i'll fix that. However, you've over-complicated the fix; I accidentally used omp_get_num_threads() instead of omp_get_max_threads(). Changing num to max is sufficient to get the intended parallelism.
    – Arthur-1
    Nov 29, 2018 at 14:03
  • And yes removing the explicit declaration would use the same number of threads (as I already mentioned at the start of my post), but I was being explicit for the sake of clarity.
    – Arthur-1
    Nov 29, 2018 at 14:08

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