1

I have a template method taking non type template arguments. It has the following form:

template <long long connectionTimeout, long long sendTimeout, bool autoAck>
void create() { ... }

It is a utility function in another header, and what annoys me in the caller's code is that the constants are not typed.

Meaning, instead of this way of calling:

create<1, 2, true>();

I prefer to have the following:

create<
    connection_timeout {1},
    send_timeout {2},
    auto_ack {true}
>();

With the create function guaranteeing that a send_timeout cannot be passed instead of a connection_timeout.

I started writing a proof of concept, however, with some gaps. I'd like to make it work with C++11/14. However, I had to use C++17 constructs (cf code) to make things work until now. That being said, I don't mind C++17 solutions to get an idea if this can be done.

What is lacking in the following is the compile time check that the types match. However, the syntax in the main is what I desire to have.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

template <typename T, T userSpecifiedValue>
struct compile_time_constant_wrapper
{
   using type = T;
   static const T defaultValue = userSpecifiedValue;

   constexpr operator T() const
   {
       return value;
   }

   T value = defaultValue;
};

using connection_timeout = compile_time_constant_wrapper<long long, 5000>;
using send_timeout = compile_time_constant_wrapper<long long, 10>;
using auto_ack = compile_time_constant_wrapper<bool, false>;

struct ComplicatedToBuild
{
    long long connectionTimeout;
    long long sendTimeout;
    bool autoAck;
};

template <typename T, 
          long long connectionTimeout = connection_timeout {} /*-std=c++17*/,
          long long sendTimeout = send_timeout {} /*-std=c++17*/,
          bool autoAck = auto_ack {} /*-std=c++17*/>
struct create
{
    operator T() const
    {
        return T{connectionTimeout, sendTimeout, autoAck};
    }
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const ComplicatedToBuild& complicated)
{
    out << "connection timeout = " << complicated.connectionTimeout << ", "
        << "send timeout = " << complicated.sendTimeout << ", "
        << "auto ack = " << complicated.autoAck;
    return out;
}

int main()
{
    ComplicatedToBuild defaultValuesCase = create<ComplicatedToBuild>();
    std::cout << "defaultValuesCase: " << defaultValuesCase << std::endl;

    ComplicatedToBuild customizedCase = create<
           ComplicatedToBuild,
           connection_timeout {2500},
           send_timeout {5},
           auto_ack {true}
    >();
    std::cout << "customizedCase: " << customizedCase << std::endl;

    ComplicatedToBuild compilationErrorCase = create<
           ComplicatedToBuild,
           send_timeout {5},
           connection_timeout {2500},
           auto_ack {true}
    >();
}

In my case, the class ComplicatedToBuild is not a plain struct. And the values required to build it are known at compile time. This is why I thought of using non type templates.

  • There are questions on SO on "strongly typed integers". stackoverflow.com/search?q=strongly+typed+integer. Hopefully you are not reinventing the wheel. – R Sahu Nov 27 '18 at 18:13
  • Or use enums as your strong type for wrapping integers? I certainly recommend using valued enums to wrap booleans. There is almost nothing worse to see in the source code than Setup(true, false, 1, false, 55000) Much better as Setup(Screen::ON, Mike::OFF, Brightness {1}, Camera::OFF, Distance{ 55000}) – Gem Taylor Nov 27 '18 at 19:51
4
#include <type_traits>    

enum class connection_timeout : long long {};
enum class send_timeout : long long {};
enum class auto_ack : bool {};

struct ComplicatedToBuild
{
    long long connectionTimeout;
    long long sendTimeout;
    bool autoAck;
};

template <typename T
        , connection_timeout connectionTimeout = connection_timeout{5000}
        , send_timeout sendTimeout = send_timeout{10}
        , auto_ack autoAck = auto_ack{false}>
T create()
{
    return {std::underlying_type_t<connection_timeout>(connectionTimeout)
          , std::underlying_type_t<send_timeout>(sendTimeout)
          , std::underlying_type_t<auto_ack>(autoAck)};
}

create<ComplicatedToBuild,
         connection_timeout{2500},
         send_timeout{5}, 
         auto_ack{true}>();

DEMO


Alternatively, instead of raising an error on argument/parameter type mismatch, you can allow arguments to be specified in an arbitrary order:

#include <tuple>

template <typename T, auto Arg, auto... Args>
T create()
{
    auto t = std::make_tuple(Arg, Args...);
    return {
         std::underlying_type_t<connection_timeout>(std::get<connection_timeout>(t))
       , std::underlying_type_t<send_timeout>(std::get<send_timeout>(t))
       , std::underlying_type_t<auto_ack>(std::get<auto_ack>(t))
    };
}

template <typename T>
T create()
{
    return create<T, connection_timeout{5000}, send_timeout{10}, auto_ack{false}>();
}

create<ComplicatedToBuild,
         connection_timeout{2500},
         send_timeout{5},
         auto_ack{true}>();    

create<ComplicatedToBuild,
         auto_ack{true},
         send_timeout{5},
         connection_timeout{2500}>();

DEMO 2

3

Here's a solution that achieves a slightly different syntax:

create<
    connection_timeout<1>,
    send_timeout<2>,
    auto_ack<true>
>();

Firstly, we need a is_instantiation_of helper:

template <typename T, template <auto...> class C>
struct is_instantiation_of_impl : std::false_type { };

template <auto... Ts, template <auto...> class C>
struct is_instantiation_of_impl<C<Ts...>, C>  : std::true_type { };

template <typename T, template <auto...> class C>
constexpr bool is_instantiation_of = is_instantiation_of_impl<T, C>::value;

Then, we can define our "strong typedefs" as classes that inherit from std::integral_constant:

template <long long X>
struct connection_timeout : std::integral_constant<long long, X> { };

template <long long X>
struct send_timeout : std::integral_constant<long long, X> { };

template <bool X>
struct auto_ack : std::integral_constant<bool, X> { };

Finally, our interface will look like this:

template <typename ConnectionTimeout,
          typename SendTimeout,
          typename AutoAck>
auto create()
    -> std::enable_if_t<
        is_instantiation_of<ConnectionTimeout, connection_timeout> 
     && is_instantiation_of<SendTimeout, send_timeout>
     && is_instantiation_of<AutoAck, auto_ack>
    >
{
}

live example on godbolt.org


With a more dramatic interface change, the code can be much simpler:

template <long long A, long long B, bool C>
auto create(connection_timeout<A>, send_timeout<B>, auto_ack<C>)
{
}

int main()
{
    create(
        connection_timeout<1>{},
        send_timeout<2>{},
        auto_ack<true>{}
    );
}

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