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Could you tell me why this did not work? I have to show Pi number from Basel problem, but I don't know why the program shows the same number all the time, despite the fact I choose different 'numbers'. Thanks a lot!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#define Pi 3.14159
int main()
{
    int number;
    printf("max number: ");
    scanf("%d",&number);
    float euler;
    float sum=0;
    for(int i=1; i<number;i++)
    {
        sum=sum + (1/(i*i));
    }
    euler=sqrt(6*sum);
    printf("Euler: %lf \n",euler);
    printf("Pi from math library = %f",Pi);
    return 0;
}
  • [I] choose different 'numbers' give us an idea about the range - what results do you get for 1, 2, 7, 42? – greybeard Nov 27 '18 at 21:30
3

The problem is that the expression (1/(i*i)) is calculated using integer mathematics. In other words, the result is always an integer, and for any value of i greater than 1, the result will always be 0.

The simplest fix is to rewrite that expression as (1.0f/(i*i)). This will square i, convert the result to a float, and then do the division.

  • Thanks a lot! <3 – Kamila Nowak Nov 27 '18 at 18:29
  • 1
    @KamilaNowak you should accept Tim's answer, since it solved your problem! – gsamaras Dec 17 '18 at 13:16
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the posted code is mixing integer division with double literal and is expecting the result to be a float

The following proposed code :

  1. cleanly compiles
  2. performs the implemented functionality

and now, the proposed code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
// define a float value rather than a double value
#define Pi 3.14159f

int main( void )
{
    int number;
    printf("max number: ");
    scanf("%d",&number);

    float euler;
    float sum=0;

    for(int i=1; i<number;i++)
    {
        // perform float math rather than integer math
        sum=sum + (1.0f/(float)(i*i));
    }

    euler=sqrtf(6*sum);  // < note float version rather than double version
    printf("Euler: %lf \n",euler);
    printf("Pi from math library = %f",Pi);
    return 0;
}
  • double literal? – Tim Randall Nov 27 '18 at 19:49
  • @TimRandall, remember that invoking a macro results in a text replacement operation, so invoking Pi results in the text 3.14159f and if the f were not there, it would be a double literal – user3629249 Nov 28 '18 at 5:39

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