4

I'm trying to create WPF client with IdentityServer authentication. I'm using their OidcClient to get logged in. It's whole async while my app is sync and can't be refactored without huge effort. Calling

var result = await _oidcClient.LoginAsync();

doesn't wait for the result. Calling Wait() or .Result causes deadlock. Wrapping it to other Task.Run is complaining that the method is not running on UI thread (it opens browser with login dialog).

Do you have any idea, how to solve this? Do I need to write custom sync OidcClient?

  • 1
    If your design requires synchronously blocking the UI thread for extended periods of time then you need to fix your design. That's the only way you're going to get working code, and the longer you put it off, the harder it'll be to actually fix. – Servy Nov 27 '18 at 21:13
  • you need to marshal the UI call in Task.Run back to the UI thread using the Invoke method on the control. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… – pm100 Nov 27 '18 at 21:13
  • @pm100 There's no reason to ever explicitly use Invoke if you're going to use the TPL (and very few situations where you should be using it if you're on older versions of .NET), nor does it do anything to resolve this problem. They're already on the UI thread, and that method needs to be called on the UI thread, so they can neither run it on another thread, nor do they need to do anything to marshal it to the UI thread. – Servy Nov 27 '18 at 21:17
  • This may be an XY problem. Show exactly what you are trying to do. You should be able to use async event handlers but I am uncertain due to lack of details.. – Nkosi Nov 27 '18 at 21:22
  • 1
    @pm100 The method they're calling is an asyncrhonous method that interacts with the UI, and as such needs to be run on the UI thread. It's incorrect to run it in a non-UI thread. It will never work if you do that. It needs to be run in the UI thread. It won't block the UI thread for an extended period of time because its asynchronous (at least the name says as much, and nothing said about it thus far indicates it's not properly running asynchronously, to the contrary, that the method is returning before the operation is done, as is said in the question, is how we know it is asynchronous). – Servy Nov 27 '18 at 21:29
5

As with other similar cases where you need to introduce asynchrony to a legacy app without much refactoring, I'd recommend using a simple "Please wait..." modal dialog. The dialog initiates an async operation and closes itself when the operation has finished.

Window.ShowDialog is a synchronous API in the way it blocks the main UI and only returns to the caller when the modal dialog has been closed. However, it still runs a nested message loop and pumps messages. Thus, the asynchronous task continuation callbacks still get pumped and executed, as opposed to using a deadlock-prone Task.Wait().

Here is a basic but complete WPF example, mocking up _oidcClient.LoginAsync() with Task.Delay() and executing it on the UI thread, refer to WpfTaskExt.Execute for the details.

Cancellation support is optional; if the actual LoginAsync can't be cancelled, the dialog is prevented from being closed prematurely.

using System;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;

namespace WpfApp1
{
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            var button = new Button() { Content = "Login", Width = 100, Height = 20 };
            button.Click += HandleLogin;
            this.Content = button;
        }

        // simulate _oidcClient.LoginAsync
        static async Task<bool> LoginAsync(CancellationToken token)
        {
            await Task.Delay(5000, token);
            return true;
        }

        void HandleLogin(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            try
            {
                var result = WpfTaskExt.Execute(
                    taskFunc: token => LoginAsync(token),
                    createDialog: () =>
                        new Window
                        {
                            Owner = this,
                            Width = 320,
                            Height = 200,
                            WindowStartupLocation = WindowStartupLocation.CenterOwner,
                            Content = new TextBox
                            {
                                Text = "Loggin in, please wait... ",
                                HorizontalContentAlignment = HorizontalAlignment.Center,
                                VerticalContentAlignment = VerticalAlignment.Center
                            },
                            WindowStyle = WindowStyle.ToolWindow
                        },
                    token: CancellationToken.None);

                MessageBox.Show($"Success: {result}");
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
            }
        }
    }

    public static class WpfTaskExt
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Execute an async func synchronously on a UI thread,
        /// on a modal dialog's nested message loop
        /// </summary>
        public static TResult Execute<TResult>(
            Func<CancellationToken, Task<TResult>> taskFunc,
            Func<Window> createDialog,
            CancellationToken token = default(CancellationToken))
        {
            var cts = CancellationTokenSource.CreateLinkedTokenSource(token);

            var dialog = createDialog();
            var canClose = false;
            Task<TResult> task = null;

            async Task<TResult> taskRunner()
            {
                try
                {
                    return await taskFunc(cts.Token);
                }
                finally
                {
                    canClose = true;
                    if (dialog.IsLoaded)
                    {
                        dialog.Close();
                    }
                }
            }

            dialog.Closing += (_, args) =>
            {
                if (!canClose)
                {
                    args.Cancel = true; // must stay open for now
                    cts.Cancel();
                }
            };

            dialog.Loaded += (_, __) =>
            {
                task = taskRunner();
            };

            dialog.ShowDialog();

            return task.GetAwaiter().GetResult();
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    Thank you! This method allows me to make a local change, not a system wide! – Jan Zahradník Nov 28 '18 at 5:48

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