1

I want to use automapper to flatten a list of entity heirarchies returned back from Entity Framework Core.

Here are my entities:

public class Employee {
    public int Id { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public double? PayRateRegular { get; set; }
    public double? PayRateLoadedRegular { get; set; }
    public double? GMOutput { get; set; }
    public string EmployeeType { get; set; }

    //List of CommissionDetails where this employee is the consultant
    public IEnumerable<CommissionDetail> CommissionDetailConsultants { get; set; } = new List<CommissionDetail>();
}

public class Project {

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public double? BillRateRegular { get; set; }
    public DateTime? StartDate { get; set; }
    public DateTime? EndDate { get; set; }

    public Customer Customer { get; set; }
    public int CustomerId { get; set; }

}

public class Customer {

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

}   

public class CommissionDetail {

    public string SaleType { get; set; }
    public double CommissionPercent { get; set; }
    public bool? IsReported { get; set; }
    public int? Level { get; set; }
    public string BasedOn { get; set; }

    public Project Project { get; set; }
    public int ProjectId { get; set; }

    public Employee SalesPerson { get; set; }
    public int SalesPersonEmployeeId { get; set; }

    public Employee Consultant { get; set; }
    public int ConsultantEmployeeId { get; set; }

}

Here is my DTO:

public class ConsultantGridViewModel
{
    public string ConsultantName { get; set; }
    public string CustomerName { get; set; }
    public string SalesPersonName { get; set; }
    public string ProjectDescription { get; set; }
    public double? PayRate { get; set; }
    public double? LoadedRated { get; set; }
    public double? BillRate { get; set; }
    public double? GM { get; set; }
    public DateTime? StartDate { get; set; }
    public DateTime? EndDate { get; set; }
    public double CommissionPercent { get; set; }
    public int? CommissionLevel { get; set; }

}

Here is my call to EF:

        return await _dbContext.Employee
            .AsNoTracking()
            .Include(e => e.CommissionDetailConsultants)
                .ThenInclude(cd => cd.SalesPerson)
            .Include(e => e.CommissionDetailConsultants)
                .ThenInclude(cd => cd.Project)
                    .ThenInclude(p => p.Customer)
            .Where(e => e.EmployeeType == "Contractor")
            .ToListAsync();

I'm currently flattening it with SelectMany as follows:

var consultants = employees.SelectMany(e =>
    e.CommissionDetailConsultants,
    (emp, com) => new ConsultantGridViewModel {
        ConsultantName = emp.Name,
        PayRate = emp.PayRateRegular,
        LoadedRated = emp.PayRateLoadedRegular,
        GM = emp.GMOutput,
        BillRate = com.Project.BillRateRegular,
        ProjectDescription = com.Project.Description,
        ProjectStartDate = com.Project.StartDate,
        ProjectEndDate = com.Project.EndDate,
        CustomerName = com.Project.Customer.Name,
        SalesPersonName = com.SalesPerson.Name,
        CommissionPercent = com.CommissionPercent,
        CommissionLevel = com.Level
    });    

I would like to use automapper instead. I've used automapper for all my other DTO mappings but I can't figure out how to use it to flatten a nested object like this.

4

Let rewrite what you have currently with SelectMany + Select utilizing the Consultant navigation property:

var consultants = employees
    .SelectMany(e => e.CommissionDetailConsultants)
    .Select(com => new ConsultantGridViewModel
    {
        ConsultantName = com.Consultant.Name,
        PayRate = com.Consultant.PayRateRegular,
        LoadedRated = com.Consultant.PayRateLoadedRegular,
        GM = com.Consultant.GMOutput,
        BillRate = com.Project.BillRateRegular,
        ProjectDescription = com.Project.Description,
        ProjectStartDate = com.Project.StartDate,
        ProjectEndDate = com.Project.EndDate,
        CustomerName = com.Project.Customer.Name,
        SalesPersonName = com.SalesPerson.Name,
        CommissionPercent = com.CommissionPercent,
        CommissionLevel = com.Level
    });

Now it can be seen that the CommissionDetail contains all the necessary data, so while you can't avoid SelectMany, you can replace the Select by creating a mapping from CommissionDetail to ConsultantGridViewModel and use something like this:

var consultants = Mapper.Map<List<ConsultantGridViewModel>>(
    employees.SelectMany(e => e.CommissionDetailConsultants));

or even better, project directly to the DTO:

var consultants = await _dbContext.Employee
    .Where(e => e.EmployeeType == "Contractor")
    .SelectMany(e => e.CommissionDetailConsultants)
    .ProjectTo<ConsultantGridViewModel>()
    .ToListAsync();

Now the mapping.

AutoMapper will map automatically members like CommisionPercent. Also the Flattening feature will handle automatically mappings like Project.EndDate -> ProjectEndDate, Consultant.Name -> ConsultantName etc.

So as usual with AutoMapper you should specify manually the mapping of properties which don't fall into previous categories. The minimal configuration in this case would be something like this:

Mapper.Initialize(cfg =>
{
    cfg.CreateMap<CommissionDetail, ConsultantGridViewModel>()
        .ForMember(dst => dst.PayRate, opt => opt.MapFrom(src => src.Consultant.PayRateRegular))
        .ForMember(dst => dst.LoadedRated, opt => opt.MapFrom(src => src.Consultant.PayRateLoadedRegular))
        .ForMember(dst => dst.GM, opt => opt.MapFrom(src => src.Consultant.GMOutput))
        .ForMember(dst => dst.BillRate, opt => opt.MapFrom(src => src.Project.BillRateRegular))
        .ForMember(dst => dst.CustomerName, opt => opt.MapFrom(src => src.Project.Customer.Name))
        .ForMember(dst => dst.CommissionLevel, opt => opt.MapFrom(src => src.Level));
});

P.S. You can even avoid SelectMany by basing your queries directly on CommissionDetail entity, for instance

var consultants = await _dbContext.Set<CommissionDetail>()
    .Where(c => c.Consultant.EmployeeType == "Contractor")
    .ProjectTo<ConsultantGridViewModel>()
    .ToListAsync();

Note that when you do direct projection, there is no need of AsNoTracking or Include / ThenInclude.

| improve this answer | |
  • Excellent. I managed to get it to work using the mapping you provided and the SelectMany on employees. I've just recently learned about ProjectTo but haven't used it yet. My project is still small enough that I can refactor to use it I think. I tried the .ProjectTo<ConsultantGridViewModel>() against the Employee entity as you showed but I'm getting an error that it can't find the definition. I'm using DI for automapper 8.0. How do I add the IQueryable Automapper extension so it is available in my class? – Alex Nov 28 '18 at 18:22
  • Oh, never mind. I just needed using Automapper.QueryableExtensions – Alex Nov 28 '18 at 18:25
  • Arg. Spoke too soon. I'm getting the following error: "Mapper not initialized. Call Initialize with appropriate configuration. If you are trying to use mapper instances through a container or otherwise, make sure you do not have any calls to the static Mapper.Map methods, and if you're using ProjectTo or UseAsDataSource extension methods, make sure you pass in the appropriate IConfigurationProvider instance". I'm using DI for Automapper 8.0 and based on the doc's I shouldn't have to pass the config. But I'm not sure how to make the ProjectTo available in repository class. – Alex Nov 28 '18 at 18:42
  • I'm afraid I'm not quite familiar with DI, my experience is with static AM usage. – Ivan Stoev Nov 28 '18 at 18:50
  • 1
    Yep, saw that in the docs also. Trying to figure that out now. I managed to get it to work passing the config provider like so: .ProjectTo<ConsultantGridViewModel>(_mapper.ConfigurationProvider) but I think that's a static method call instead of DI. I'll see if I can figure it out and if not, I'll post is as another question. Thanks for the help – Alex Nov 28 '18 at 19:12

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