1

Prerequisite

This is a question is an extension of this post. So, some of the introduction of the problem will be similar to that post.

Problem

Let's say result is a 2D array and values is a 1D array. values holds some values associated with each element in result. The mapping of an element in values to result is stored in x_mapping and y_mapping. A position in result can be associated with different values. (x,y) pair from x_mapping and y_mapping is associated with results[-y,x]. I have to find the unique count of the values grouped by associations.

An example for better clarification.

result array:

[[ 0.,  0.],
[ 0.,  0.],
[ 0.,  0.],
[ 0.,  0.]]

values array:

[ 1.,  2.,  1.,  1.,  5.,  6.,  7.,  1.]

Note: Here result arrays and values have the same number of elements. But it might not be the case. There is no relation between the sizes at all.

x_mapping and y_mapping have mappings from 1D values to 2D result. The sizes of x_mapping, y_mapping and values will be the same.

x_mapping - [0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]

y_mapping - [0, 3, 2, 2, 0, 3, 2, 0]

Here, 1st value(values[0]), 5th value(values[4]) and 8th value(values[7]) have x as 0 and y as 0 (x_mapping[0] and y_mappping[0]) and hence associated with result[0, 0]. If we compute the count of distinct values from this group- (1,5,1), we will have 2 as result. @WarrenWeckesser Let's see how [1, 3] (x,y) pair from x_mapping and y_mapping contribute to results. Since there is only one value, ie 2, associated with this particular group, the results[-3,1] will have one as the number of distinct values associated with that cell is one.

Another example. Let's compute the value of results[-1,1]. From mappings, since there is no value associated with the cell, the value of results[-1,1] will be zero.

Similarly, the position [-2, 0] in results will have value 2.

Note that if there is no association at all then the default value for result will be zero.

The result after computation,

[[ 2.,  0.],
[ 1.,  1.],
[ 2.,  0.],
[ 0.,  0.]]

Current working solution

Using the answer from @Divakar, I was able to find a working solution.

x_mapping = np.array([0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])
y_mapping = np.array([0, 3, 2, 2, 0, 3, 2, 0])
values = np.array([ 1.,  2.,  1.,  1.,  5.,  6.,  7.,  1.], dtype=np.float32)
result = np.zeros([4, 2], dtype=np.float32) 

m,n = result.shape
out_dtype = result.dtype
lidx = ((-y_mapping)%m)*n + x_mapping

sidx = lidx.argsort()
idx = lidx[sidx]
val = values[sidx]

m_idx = np.flatnonzero(np.r_[True,idx[:-1] != idx[1:]])
unq_ids = idx[m_idx]

r_res = np.zeros(m_idx.size, dtype=np.float32)
for i in range(0, m_idx.shape[0]):
    _next = None
    arr = None
    if i == m_idx.shape[0]-1:
        _next = val.shape[0]
    else:
        _next = m_idx[i+1]
    _start = m_idx[i]

    if _start >= _next:
        arr = val[_start]
    else:
        arr = val[_start:_next]
    r_res[i] = np.unique(arr).size
result.flat[unq_ids] = r_res

Question

Now, the above solution takes 15ms for operating on 19943 values. I'm looking for a way to compute the result faster. Is there any more performant way to do this?

Side note

I'm using Numpy version 1.14.3 with Python 3.5.2

Edits

Thanks to @WarrenWeckesser, pointing out that I haven't explained how an element in results is associated with (x,y) from mappings. I have updated the post and added examples for clarity.

  • I'm having trouble reconciling your description of how you computed result[0,0] with the rest of the values in result (which are generated by the code that you say is working). For example, in the x_mapping and y_mapping arrays, the (x, y) pair [1, 3] occurs once. My understanding is that these are the column and row indices into result. So why isn't result[3, 1] equal to 1? And in the computed result, you have result[1, 0] = 1 and result[1, 1] = 1, but neither of the (x, y) pairs [0, 1] and [1, 1] occurs in the mapping arrays. – Warren Weckesser Nov 28 '18 at 8:24
  • @WarrenWeckesser, Thanks for pointing it out. I apologize for not adding details on how (x,y) pair is associated with elements in results. Each pair of (x,y) is associated with results[-y,x]. I have updated the post and added examples for clarity. Thanks. – tpk Nov 28 '18 at 10:10
1

Here is one solution

import numpy as np

x_mapping = np.array([0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])
y_mapping = np.array([0, 3, 2, 2, 0, 3, 2, 0])
values = np.array([ 1.,  2.,  1.,  1.,  5.,  6.,  7.,  1.], dtype=np.float32)
result = np.zeros([4, 2], dtype=np.float32)

# Get flat indices
idx_mapping = np.ravel_multi_index((-y_mapping, x_mapping), result.shape, mode='wrap')
# Sort flat indices and reorders values accordingly
reorder = np.argsort(idx_mapping)
idx_mapping = idx_mapping[reorder]
values = values[reorder]
# Get unique values
val_uniq = np.unique(values)
# Find where each unique value appears
val_uniq_hit = values[:, np.newaxis] == val_uniq
# Find reduction indices (slices with the same flat index)
reduce_idx = np.concatenate([[0], np.nonzero(np.diff(idx_mapping))[0] + 1])
# Reduce slices
reduced = np.logical_or.reduceat(val_uniq_hit, reduce_idx)
# Count distinct values on each slice
counts = np.count_nonzero(reduced, axis=1)
# Put counts in result
result.flat[idx_mapping[reduce_idx]] = counts

print(result)
# [[2. 0.]
#  [1. 1.]
#  [2. 0.]
#  [0. 0.]]

This method takes more memory (O(len(values) * len(np.unique(values)))), but a small benchmark comparing with your original solution shows a significant speedup (although that depends on the actual size of the problem):

import numpy as np

np.random.seed(100)
result = np.zeros([400, 200], dtype=np.float32)
values = np.random.randint(100, size=(20000,)).astype(np.float32)
x_mapping = np.random.randint(result.shape[1], size=values.shape)
y_mapping = np.random.randint(result.shape[0], size=values.shape)

res1 = solution_orig(x_mapping, y_mapping, values, result)
res2 = solution(x_mapping, y_mapping, values, result)
print(np.allclose(res1, res2))
# True

# Original solution
%timeit solution_orig(x_mapping, y_mapping, values, result)
# 76.2 ms ± 623 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

# This solution
%timeit solution(x_mapping, y_mapping, values, result)
# 13.8 ms ± 51.3 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

Full code of benchmark functions:

import numpy as np

def solution(x_mapping, y_mapping, values, result):
    result = np.array(result)
    idx_mapping = np.ravel_multi_index((-y_mapping, x_mapping), result.shape, mode='wrap')
    reorder = np.argsort(idx_mapping)
    idx_mapping = idx_mapping[reorder]
    values = values[reorder]
    val_uniq = np.unique(values)
    val_uniq_hit = values[:, np.newaxis] == val_uniq
    reduce_idx = np.concatenate([[0], np.nonzero(np.diff(idx_mapping))[0] + 1])
    reduced = np.logical_or.reduceat(val_uniq_hit, reduce_idx)
    counts = np.count_nonzero(reduced, axis=1)
    result.flat[idx_mapping[reduce_idx]] = counts
    return result

def solution_orig(x_mapping, y_mapping, values, result):
    result = np.array(result)
    m,n = result.shape
    out_dtype = result.dtype
    lidx = ((-y_mapping)%m)*n + x_mapping

    sidx = lidx.argsort()
    idx = lidx[sidx]
    val = values[sidx]

    m_idx = np.flatnonzero(np.r_[True,idx[:-1] != idx[1:]])
    unq_ids = idx[m_idx]

    r_res = np.zeros(m_idx.size, dtype=np.float32)
    for i in range(0, m_idx.shape[0]):
        _next = None
        arr = None
        if i == m_idx.shape[0]-1:
            _next = val.shape[0]
        else:
            _next = m_idx[i+1]
        _start = m_idx[i]

        if _start >= _next:
            arr = val[_start]
        else:
            arr = val[_start:_next]
        r_res[i] = np.unique(arr).size
    result.flat[unq_ids] = r_res
    return result
  • Thanks for answering. I modified the existing solution with your logic of using np.logical_or.reduceat. It's way faster. Thanks. – tpk Nov 29 '18 at 14:43

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